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How To Make Non-Gluten-Free Recipe A Gluten-Free Recipe

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I have seen this recipe and want to make it a gluten-free recipe but I believe I have read where the non-gluten-free flour and gluten-free flour substitution is not identical. Anyone know how to convert this?

2 cups fig preserves

3/4 cup shortening

2 eggs

1 cup white sugar

2 cups all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

2 teaspoons baking powder

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It depends on what you're trying to make. What's the recipe supposed to be for?

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You can swap the flour out by:

Substituting an all-purpose gluten-free flour in place of all-purpose regular flour at a ratio of 1:1. Pamela's, Bob's Red Mill, Jules, King Arthur gluten-free, etc. --these are good all-purpose gluten-free flours.

OR

Create your own flour blend. This makes 6 cups of all-purpose flour. So reduce it in the proper ratios to fit your needs or keep it stored in a tight container in the fridge. This is Mary Capone's All Purpose Blend.

2 cups white rice flour

2 cups brown rice flour

1 1/3 cups potato starch (NOT potato flour)

2/3 cup tapioca flour/starch. (they are the same thing)

Mix together.

*** AND ***

Xanthan gum (or guar gum) is used in gluten-free baking because it is a binding agent that gives baked goods elasticity.

Living Without Magazine suggests:

Add 1/2 tsp. per cup of flour blend for cakes, cookies, bars, muffins.

Add 1 Tsp. per cup if you are making yeast bread, pizza dough, other baked goods that call for yeast.

If you use a commercial flour blend, read the ingredients because they may have already added xanthan or guar gum already.

Others may tell you you do not need a gum for cooking and they can suggest good alternatives.

Happy Cooking!

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It depends on what you're trying to make. What's the recipe supposed to be for?

It is for homemade fig newtons.

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You can swap the flour out by:

Substituting an all-purpose gluten-free flour in place of all-purpose regular flour at a ratio of 1:1. Pamela's, Bob's Red Mill, Jules, King Arthur gluten-free, etc. --these are good all-purpose gluten-free flours.

OR

Create your own flour blend. This makes 6 cups of all-purpose flour. So reduce it in the proper ratios to fit your needs or keep it stored in a tight container in the fridge. This is Mary Capone's All Purpose Blend.

2 cups white rice flour

2 cups brown rice flour

1 1/3 cups potato starch (NOT potato flour)

2/3 cup tapioca flour/starch. (they are the same thing)

Mix together.

*** AND ***

Xanthan gum (or guar gum) is used in gluten-free baking because it is a binding agent that gives baked goods elasticity.

Living Without Magazine suggests:

Add 1/2 tsp. per cup of flour blend for cakes, cookies, bars, muffins.

Add 1 Tsp. per cup if you are making yeast bread, pizza dough, other baked goods that call for yeast.

If you use a commercial flour blend, read the ingredients because they may have already added xanthan or guar gum already.

Others may tell you you do not need a gum for cooking and they can suggest good alternatives.

Happy Cooking!

Thank you, thank you, thank you! :)

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Thank you, thank you, thank you! :)

You're welcome! Let me know how they come out. My hubby loves those!

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It is for homemade fig newtons.

That's an important bit of information! Since the dough isn't really supposed to rise, and since it's supposed to remain sorta soft after baking, I would not use any gums. Also, since gluten-free flours already don't hold together very much on their own, the fat content should likely be reduced, to a relatively small amount I'd think.

This might be a good place to use coconut flour too. I'm just not sure what to expect from the high amount of sugar the recipe calls for, as I've been baking without sugar even before going gluten-free.

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It is for homemade fig newtons.

Jovial makes pretty good gluten-free fig newtons. I'm not trying to discourage you from baking, just letting you know there is something out there. I like them because they really do taste like "regular" food. I think it's because the fruit filling doesn't change and the dough doesn't have to puff. You may look up their ingredients and see what they use as flour.

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Jovial makes pretty good gluten-free fig newtons. I'm not trying to discourage you from baking, just letting you know there is something out there. I like them because they really do taste like "regular" food. I think it's because the fruit filling doesn't change and the dough doesn't have to puff. You may look up their ingredients and see what they use as flour.

I will remember that brand name. Problem is that I have a step-father that puts up fig preserves every year and I am overloaded with them. I have searched for a recipe to use all of the preserves that I have and this is the one I came up with. Just still struggling with trying to bake things I can eat and taste good too.

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I will remember that brand name. Problem is that I have a step-father that puts up fig preserves every year and I am overloaded with them. I have searched for a recipe to use all of the preserves that I have and this is the one I came up with. Just still struggling with trying to bake things I can eat and taste good too.

Your step-father isn't a problem :). My grandmother used to make fig preserves, now she has a hard time getting the figs or people to take the preserves. I made them one year. Love them!

Good luck!

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That's an important bit of information! Since the dough isn't really supposed to rise, and since it's supposed to remain sorta soft after baking, I would not use any gums. Also, since gluten-free flours already don't hold together very much on their own, the fat content should likely be reduced, to a relatively small amount I'd think.

This might be a good place to use coconut flour too. I'm just not sure what to expect from the high amount of sugar the recipe calls for, as I've been baking without sugar even before going gluten-free.

see, now, that's why I said "others may suggest you do not need gums" as I know that varies from recipe to recipe...Thanks, RiceGuy! :)

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Also, since gluten-free flours already don't hold together very much on their own, the fat content should likely be reduced, to a relatively small amount I'd think.

RiceGuy, this statement puzzles me. Do fats not hold things together?? Now I know butter makes shortbread crumbly - is the same principle at work here?

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RiceGuy, this statement puzzles me. Do fats not hold things together?? Now I know butter makes shortbread crumbly - is the same principle at work here?

Yes, the same principle. Another example would be pie crust. Having far more oil than water prevents the gluten from forming the long chains which give breads and pasta that characteristic elasticity. That's why pie crust is relatively crumbly and brittle. Therefore, since gluten-free flours are essentially on the opposite end of the scale - that is, they have very little stickiness on their own - it often isn't necessary or desirable to use the same ratio of fat in a gluten-free recipe as would traditionally be used in a wheat flour version.

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Yes, the same principle. Another example would be pie crust. Having far more oil than water prevents the gluten from forming the long chains which give breads and pasta that characteristic elasticity. That's why pie crust is relatively crumbly and brittle. Therefore, since gluten-free flours are essentially on the opposite end of the scale - that is, they have very little stickiness on their own - it often isn't necessary or desirable to use the same ratio of fat in a gluten-free recipe as would traditionally be used in a wheat flour version.

That's interesting because I used the same amount of lard to re-create my mother's to-die-for pie crust recipe. I almost gave up on pie dough made with alternative flours (blech) until I had the brilliant idea of using lard. The real test was when my MOM was here at Thanksgiving (she's gluten-free now, too :) ) and all of us thought the pie crust was flaky and delicious. I even took a picture of it. :lol: I almost cried at how good it was because that was the one thing I truly missed. It was exactly the same as Mom's recipe, same amount of flours and fat. I wonder why it worked so well for me?

Not that one should consume vast quantities of lard, of course, but for apple pie once a year? oh yeah, baby--it was AWESOME. :)

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That's interesting because I used the same amount of lard to re-create my mother's to-die-for pie crust recipe. I almost gave up on pie dough made with alternative flours (blech) until I had the brilliant idea of using lard. The real test was when my MOM was here at Thanksgiving (she's gluten-free now, too :) ) and all of us thought the pie crust was flaky and delicious. I even took a picture of it. :lol: I almost cried at how good it was because that was the one thing I truly missed. It was exactly the same as Mom's recipe, same amount of flours and fat. I wonder why it worked so well for me?

Not that one should consume vast quantities of lard, of course, but for apple pie once a year? oh yeah, baby--it was AWESOME. :)

I've had some translate 1:1, others need reducing. It's really an experiment. I think butter and liquid fats are less forgiving than shortening. Perhaps lard works like shortening since its solid.

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That's interesting because I used the same amount of lard to re-create my mother's to-die-for pie crust recipe. I almost gave up on pie dough made with alternative flours (blech) until I had the brilliant idea of using lard. The real test was when my MOM was here at Thanksgiving (she's gluten-free now, too :) ) and all of us thought the pie crust was flaky and delicious. I even took a picture of it. :lol: I almost cried at how good it was because that was the one thing I truly missed. It was exactly the same as Mom's recipe, same amount of flours and fat. I wonder why it worked so well for me?

Not that one should consume vast quantities of lard, of course, but for apple pie once a year? oh yeah, baby--it was AWESOME. :)

I think pricklypear1971 basically said it - lard is a particularly hard, solid type of fat. Although it's not just the nature of the fat, but the method of preparation. In that recipe you used, I suppose the ingredients were mixed to a large crumb stage, so that it was fairly loose, rather than being a completely uniform and smooth ball of dough. And therefor, likely pressed into the pan, rather than being rolled out. Is that correct?

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I think pricklypear1971 basically said it - lard is a particularly hard, solid type of fat. Although it's not just the nature of the fat, but the method of preparation. In that recipe you used, I suppose the ingredients were mixed to a large crumb stage, so that it was fairly loose, rather than being a completely uniform and smooth ball of dough. And therefor, likely pressed into the pan, rather than being rolled out. Is that correct?

No, actually, it made a beautiful, workable dough.

I know that lard works well in pie dough. I've used it for many years,so I thought, why wouldn't it work with a gluten-free flour mix?

I cut the lard into the flour mix (I used the basic flour mix from the Bronski's Recipe in Artisinal Gluten Free Cooking) and the wet ingredients and formed it into a pretty elastic dough.

I made a smooth ball, wrapped it in saran wrap and chilled it for half an hour and rolled it out with a chilled marble rolling pin on a marble slab.

I was pretty excited by it. :lol:

My friend who is a professional baker said after I told her how well it turned out, "Yup, it's the lard".

Some experiments pay off. :)

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No, actually, it made a beautiful, workable dough.

I know that lard works well in pie dough. I've used it for many years,so I thought, why wouldn't it work with a gluten-free flour mix?

I cut the lard into the flour mix (I used the basic flour mix from the Bronski's Recipe in Artisinal Gluten Free Cooking) and the wet ingredients and formed it into a pretty elastic dough.

I made a smooth ball, wrapped it in saran wrap and chilled it for half an hour and rolled it out with a chilled marble rolling pin on a marble slab.

I was pretty excited by it. :lol:

My friend who is a professional baker said after I told her how well it turned out, "Yup, it's the lard".

Some experiments pay off. :)

Pork fat rules!

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I will remember that brand name. Problem is that I have a step-father that puts up fig preserves every year and I am overloaded with them. I have searched for a recipe to use all of the preserves that I have and this is the one I came up with. Just still struggling with trying to bake things I can eat and taste good too.

I LOVE making fig preserves. We only get fresh figs in once a year as we live on the Canadian prairies. I use them in several ways:

- on a cheese board with great cheeses, mostarda, melons, nuts and prosciutto

- as a glaze on pork, duck, goose, lamb

- on gluten-free scones

- mix some in with a balsamic (or other) vinaigrette

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Pork fat rules!

:lol: well, it surely does in pie crusts!

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No, actually, it made a beautiful, workable dough.

I know that lard works well in pie dough. I've used it for many years,so I thought, why wouldn't it work with a gluten-free flour mix?

I cut the lard into the flour mix (I used the basic flour mix from the Bronski's Recipe in Artisinal Gluten Free Cooking) and the wet ingredients and formed it into a pretty elastic dough.

I made a smooth ball, wrapped it in saran wrap and chilled it for half an hour and rolled it out with a chilled marble rolling pin on a marble slab.

I was pretty excited by it. :lol:

My friend who is a professional baker said after I told her how well it turned out, "Yup, it's the lard".

Some experiments pay off. :)

Wow, that's very interesting! I've never worked with lard, or shortening either. Even before going gluten-free, I always used a pie crust recipe from an old cookbook which was first printed in the late 1800s. It called for cooking oil, required no refrigeration, and everyone said it was a great crust. I'll have to experiment with coconut oil just to see what happens. Coconut oil is solid below 76°, and a fair bit harder than butter when refrigerated. Do you have the flour mix recipe?

Anyway, to get back on topic, I seriously doubt the cake part of the fig newton recipe will work as well with the original fat ratio, as it could if reduced. Simply because there's no gluten to defeat. But again, the wild card to me is the sugar, which I haven't ever baked with gluten-free.

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Wow, that's very interesting! I've never worked with lard, or shortening either. Even before going gluten-free, I always used a pie crust recipe from an old cookbook which was first printed in the late 1800s. It called for cooking oil, required no refrigeration, and everyone said it was a great crust. I'll have to experiment with coconut oil just to see what happens. Coconut oil is solid below 76°, and a fair bit harder than butter when refrigerated. Do you have the flour mix recipe?

Sure! This is their basic flour mix for all the recipes in their book.

Here you go:

1 1/4 cups brown rice flour

3/4 cup sorghum flour

2/3 cup cornstarch

1/4 cup potato starch

1 tabiespoon + 1 teaspoon potato flour

1 teaspoon xanthan gum

MAKES ABOUT 3 CUPS

If you want the pie crust recipe too, I can provide it.

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Sure! This is their basic flour mix for all the recipes in their book.

Here you go:

1 1/4 cups brown rice flour

3/4 cup sorghum flour

2/3 cup cornstarch

1/4 cup potato starch

1 tabiespoon + 1 teaspoon potato flour

1 teaspoon xanthan gum

MAKES ABOUT 3 CUPS

Thanks!

If you want the pie crust recipe too, I can provide it.

Yes, please. Though I can't help but feel that this conversation is too far off-topic, so send it via PM, if you would.

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Thanks!

Yes, please. Though I can't help but feel that this conversation is too far off-topic, so send it via PM, if you would.

I was going to suggest that myself. Hate to be a "hijacker" :lol:

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I was going to suggest that myself. Hate to be a "hijacker" :lol:

Then send me a PM too, please :D

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