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Celiac, Candida And Nystatin

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Hi everyone,

I was diagnosed with Celiac through a blood test along with candida albicans; my level for candida was +3.3 about 3 months ago. My Dr. put me on liquid Nystatin 1,000,000 units (about a tablespoon) 4x a day. I have been following the yeast and gluten free diet devoutly.

I am wondering 2 things:

Has anyone on this forum has had success in treating celiac-related candida with nystatin? As restrictive as a gluten free diet is, gluten free is paradise compared to a candida diet!

When/did those who took nystatin stop the die off reaction? 3 months in and I am still feeling the die off with each dose I take. (The naturopath, who is angry I am taking a prescription, just said I was "weird" and she'd never known anyone to herx throughout the whole dose.)

This is such a positive place to get feedback. I really appreciate anyone's help with this.

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I have to wonder if you are reacting to the Nystatin rather than experiencing die-off, since it's going for this long and you feel it after every dose.

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I have to wonder if you are reacting to the Nystatin rather than experiencing die-off, since it's going for this long and you feel it after every dose.

I think you might be right. The pharmacist pointed out that the liquid Nystatin I was taking was 33% sucrose. The herxheimer reaction I got every time I took it could have been a reaction to liquid sugar.

I am going to have the format of the Nystatin changed to pill form and take the herba anti-fungals my naturopath recommends.

Does anyone else have celiac/candida success strategies they can share?

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I think you might be right. The pharmacist pointed out that the liquid Nystatin I was taking was 33% sucrose. The herxheimer reaction I got every time I took it could have been a reaction to liquid sugar.

I am going to have the format of the Nystatin changed to pill form and take the herba anti-fungals my naturopath recommends.

Does anyone else have celiac/candida success strategies they can share?

I know exactly what you are going thru as I did the Candida diet twice in my lifetime, when I thought my problem was all Candida and knew little to nothing about Celiac. Turns out I had both problems but following the Candida diet and taking Nystatin made me feel a whole lot better. You are also correct in that the Candida diet is much harder to deal with than going gluten free....the gluten-free diet is easy compared to that.

Here is what I learned in the 2 years I followed the diet....taking liquid Nystatin is a big no-no as it's mainly sugar and sugar feeds yeast. Yes, hard to believe that anyone would prescribe a sugar laden med to combat Candida but that's how deep the ignorance goes! :o You need to get the powdered form of Nystatin and either have it put into capsules OR mix it with water and drink it...which is what I did. The sugar laden Nystatin is mainly used to give to infants with thrush so they'll swallow it. Nystatin by itself is not the greatest thing taste-wise and infants would spit it out. It still feeds the yeast and that's why some babies have repeat occurrences of thrush but try telling the medical profession that! DUH! You are actually making the yeast growth worse by using this form and that's why you are having reactions. Been there, done that, no thank you.....

If you follow a strict Candida, absolutely no sugar diet :( , and take the Nystatin in it's natural form, it should clear up the problem well. I got sick from die off within a month of starting this regimen and got a Rx for Diflucan to take as an added boost and it worked well. After about 6 weeks on the diet when the die off subsided, I felt better than I have felt in years. Still had Celiac but I didn't know it at the time. The Candida diet will make a Celiac feel better because you cannot have any refined carbs at all. The only carb I ate was brown rice....nothing white at all.

I wish you luck with this because it is hard....mood swings from hell from the sugar withdrawal. Gluten was a piece of cake to give up compared to this! However, those level out after a few weeks and you get your sanity back.

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I know exactly what you are going thru as I did the Candida diet twice in my lifetime, when I thought my problem was all Candida and knew little to nothing about Celiac. Turns out I had both problems but following the Candida diet and taking Nystatin made me feel a whole lot better. You are also correct in that the Candida diet is much harder to deal with than going gluten free....the gluten-free diet is easy compared to that.

Here is what I learned in the 2 years I followed the diet....taking liquid Nystatin is a big no-no as it's mainly sugar and sugar feeds yeast. Yes, hard to believe that anyone would prescribe a sugar laden med to combat Candida but that's how deep the ignorance goes! :o You need to get the powdered form of Nystatin and either have it put into capsules OR mix it with water and drink it...which is what I did. The sugar laden Nystatin is mainly used to give to infants with thrush so they'll swallow it. Nystatin by itself is not the greatest thing taste-wise and infants would spit it out. It still feeds the yeast and that's why some babies have repeat occurrences of thrush but try telling the medical profession that! DUH! You are actually making the yeast growth worse by using this form and that's why you are having reactions. Been there, done that, no thank you.....

If you follow a strict Candida, absolutely no sugar diet :( , and take the Nystatin in it's natural form, it should clear up the problem well. I got sick from die off within a month of starting this regimen and got a Rx for Diflucan to take as an added boost and it worked well. After about 6 weeks on the diet when the die off subsided, I felt better than I have felt in years. Still had Celiac but I didn't know it at the time. The Candida diet will make a Celiac feel better because you cannot have any refined carbs at all. The only carb I ate was brown rice....nothing white at all.

I wish you luck with this because it is hard....mood swings from hell from the sugar withdrawal. Gluten was a piece of cake to give up compared to this! However, those level out after a few weeks and you get your sanity back.

Thank you so much for this information! I had no idea that the ignorance went as deep as you point out it has. I figured the manufacturer knew what they were doing. But your point about infants and thrush makes sense. They can't take pills and would spit out something bad tasting.

I have been good with the candida/no sugar or starch diet (not even diet coke and fake sugar!) and still felt badly. I was crying with frustration and fear that I would never get better. Driving my naturopath (who wanted me to only use garlic, caprylic acid etc and didn't know enough about Nystatin liquid b/c that's not her field) and my therapist insane.

I think I will stick to my naturopath's recommendations until I can get my GP to switch to the Nystatin pills.

It is wonderful to hear that you recovered and can live on the Celiac diet and feel well. I am aspiring to get there.

Thanks to you and to the other well-informed people on the forum. I don't know what I would do without all of you to help me problem solve.

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Thank you so much for this information! I had no idea that the ignorance went as deep as you point out it has. I figured the manufacturer knew what they were doing. But your point about infants and thrush makes sense. They can't take pills and would spit out something bad tasting.

I have been good with the candida/no sugar or starch diet (not even diet coke and fake sugar!) and still felt badly. I was crying with frustration and fear that I would never get better. Driving my naturopath (who wanted me to only use garlic, caprylic acid etc and didn't know enough about Nystatin liquid b/c that's not her field) and my therapist insane.

I think I will stick to my naturopath's recommendations until I can get my GP to switch to the Nystatin pills.

It is wonderful to hear that you recovered and can live on the Celiac diet and feel well. I am aspiring to get there.

Thanks to you and to the other well-informed people on the forum. I don't know what I would do without all of you to help me problem solve.

The most important thing to do is not eat any sugar or food that will break down into sugars...refined carbs.

They feed yeast. For an example, place some yeast in warm water and add some sugar...this is called "proofing" the yeast. It proves the yeast is still good or active. The yeast goes wild!

Nystatin is a Rx anti-fungal. It is the big guns as far as combating yeast systemically. Caprylic acid is supposed to be very good also but I think for a really bad yeast issue, a Rx anti-fungal works best. It does take time and you may have to follow the diet for awhile....like recovering from Celiac. Once the problem is gone, however, you don't have to be as strict with the sugar intake. You may feel crappy for a couple of months too as the yeast is purged from your system. It does work well though.

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Hi everyone,

I was diagnosed with Celiac through a blood test along with candida albicans; my level for candida was +3.3 about 3 months ago. My Dr. put me on liquid Nystatin 1,000,000 units (about a tablespoon) 4x a day. I have been following the yeast and gluten free diet devoutly.

I am wondering 2 things:

Has anyone on this forum has had success in treating celiac-related candida with nystatin? As restrictive as a gluten free diet is, gluten free is paradise compared to a candida diet!

When/did those who took nystatin stop the die off reaction? 3 months in and I am still feeling the die off with each dose I take. (The naturopath, who is angry I am taking a prescription, just said I was "weird" and she'd never known anyone to herx throughout the whole dose.)

I successfully treated my candida infection (diagnosed by stool test) with nystatin. I took that for 3 months. I had side effects from nystatin during most of that treatment period. I don't believe in 'die off', but I experienced the listed common side effects from nystatin.

I agree that the 'candida diet' is waaaay too restrictive. I also haven't read that anyone with candida (idagnosed by stool test) ever 'starved out' their candida with that diet. I often read about people, who suspect they have candida, using that diet and then thinking they recovered from candida. However, I never read that they were actually diagnosed with candida by stool test before using that diet.

I have 6 diagnosed food allergies in addition to celiac (gluten intolerance restriction). I have lots of safe foods even with my 7 food restrictions. I tried the anticandida diet for 3 weeks when my NP suspected candida. I lost 4 pounds in 3 weeks and didn't need to lose any weight. Fortunately I didn't have candida at that time. So when I had measureable candida on a later test, I opted to take Nystatin, rather than try that diet again.

This is such a positive place to get feedback. I really appreciate anyone's help with this.

I successfuly treated my candida infection (diagnosed by stool test) by taking Nystatin for 3 months. (The next 4 stool tests were free of candida.) I don't believe in 'die off', but I did experience the listed side effects of Nystatin for almost all 3 months of the treatment period. Eventually my body adjusted to that drug and I stopped experiencing the symptoms.

Before I evern was diagnosed with Candida, I tried the 'anti candida' diet for 3 weeks and lost 4 pounds when I didn't need to lose an ounce. So when I acutally had candida, I opted to use Nystatin. I have celiac disease and 6 additional diagnosed food allergies. I have lots of safe foods with those 7 allergy restrictions. By comparison I had difficulty finding anything to eat on that candida diet.

I've read about people using the anticandida diet to 'starve' their yeastie beasties to death. However, most people using that diet were not actually diagnosed by stool test with candida. They just tried the diet because they thought their symptoms meant they had candida. So when the symptoms went away, they thought the diet cured them. I haven't meat anyone who recoverd from diagnosed (by stool test) candida, by using the anticandida diet.

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I successfuly treated my candida infection (diagnosed by stool test) by taking Nystatin for 3 months. (The next 4 stool tests were free of candida.) I don't believe in 'die off', but I did experience the listed side effects of Nystatin for almost all 3 months of the treatment period. Eventually my body adjusted to that drug and I stopped experiencing the symptoms.

Before I evern was diagnosed with Candida, I tried the 'anti candida' diet for 3 weeks and lost 4 pounds when I didn't need to lose an ounce. So when I acutally had candida, I opted to use Nystatin. I have celiac disease and 6 additional diagnosed food allergies. I have lots of safe foods with those 7 allergy restrictions. By comparison I had difficulty finding anything to eat on that candida diet.

I've read about people using the anticandida diet to 'starve' their yeastie beasties to death. However, most people using that diet were not actually diagnosed by stool test with candida. They just tried the diet because they thought their symptoms meant they had candida. So when the symptoms went away, they thought the diet cured them. I haven't meat anyone who recoverd from diagnosed (by stool test) candida, by using the anticandida diet.

Well then, consider me your first person who achieved this! :D I tried taking the Nystatin alone and it did not work without following the diet. I did do both, though, as you cannot get rid of candida with just the diet alone. If you keep feeding the candida, then it's difficult to eradicate it from your body. However, there are varying levels of infection so maybe some have luck with just using Nystatin...who's to say?

I also did not find the candida diet difficult after about a month....it's like Celiac, the longer you do it and the more you learn about food choices, the easier it becomes. It all depends on how badly you want to get better.

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I think you might be right. The pharmacist pointed out that the liquid Nystatin I was taking was 33% sucrose. The herxheimer reaction I got every time I took it could have been a reaction to liquid sugar.

I am going to have the format of the Nystatin changed to pill form and take the herba anti-fungals my naturopath recommends.

I think you misunderstood me. Nystatin is a fairly toxic drug and while it's supposed to be poorly absorbed, allergies and side effects are still possible. Herxheimer symptoms are not very specific and many of the symptoms overlap Nystatin toxicity reactions. Nystatin can damage your liver if your intestines are damaged enough from celiac that you are absorbing some of it.

I don't understand why folks take Nystatin for mild candidiasis. Candida is pretty easy to kill with probiotics and safe, natural foods like coconut oil. I'm not sure people grasp how toxic antifungals are. As one of my biology teachers said, "fungi are eucaryotes and so are we". Nystatin is safe if and only if your gut is in good enough shape that none of it gets through to your bloodstream. That's too big an if for me.

Agreed that diet alone won't cut it for candida. Nature abhors a vacuum and as soon as you shift off the restrictive diet it will grow right back unless you manage to get a good population of bacteria going.

By the way, you don't need a stool test to diagnose candida if you're getting recurring thrush or vaginal yeast. If it's in one part of your body, it's everywhere.

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I think you misunderstood me. Nystatin is a fairly toxic drug and while it's supposed to be poorly absorbed, allergies and side effects are still possible. Herxheimer symptoms are not very specific and many of the symptoms overlap Nystatin toxicity reactions. Nystatin can damage your liver if your intestines are damaged enough from celiac that you are absorbing some of it.

I don't understand why folks take Nystatin for mild candidiasis. Candida is pretty easy to kill with probiotics and safe, natural foods like coconut oil. I'm not sure people grasp how toxic antifungals are. As one of my biology teachers said, "fungi are eucaryotes and so are we". Nystatin is safe if and only if your gut is in good enough shape that none of it gets through to your bloodstream. That's too big an if for me.

Agreed that diet alone won't cut it for candida. Nature abhors a vacuum and as soon as you shift off the restrictive diet it will grow right back unless you manage to get a good population of bacteria going.

By the way, you don't need a stool test to diagnose candida if you're getting recurring thrush or vaginal yeast. If it's in one part of your body, it's everywhere.

Skylark...you are being a scaremonger here. People who take Rx anti-fungals are taking it for systemic candida infections that may have plagued them for years and just taking probiotics will not get rid of the problem. It's part of the therapy but not the sole cure.

Systemic candida can kill you and that is not a scare tactic..it's true. I can assure you that when I was suffering from it, it was hardly a "mild" case. I never got rid of the thrush I had and had a sore throat for most of a one year period. I also lost my sense of taste and had a sore tongue, which made it difficult to eat. Try that and then tell me I shouldn't have taken Nystatin. Not only did it do the trick, it did not damage my liver or cause any other side effects while taking it. Combined with the diet, I got rid of the infection and never had a problem with it again.

I don't mind if people choose a more natural route for their treatment but when you have it bad, you sometimes have to nuke the problem hard. Candida as a systemic issue is far more toxic to your system than Nystatin is.

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I don't like your insulting tone, Gemini. Someone says "I have a reaction after every dose of a drug" and anyone with a shred of common sense would say "gee, maybe it's the drug."

I'm glad to hear Nystatin helped you, but it doesn't mean it's the right medicine for everyone. People die of bacterial infections, but they also die from penicillin allergy. Like antibiotics, Nystatin is somewhat overprescribed. I just think Albion needs to talk to her doctor to make sure the reactions are still Herxheimer and not a allergic sensitization or irritation/toxicity issue.

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I don't like your insulting tone, Gemini. Someone says "I have a reaction after every dose of a drug" and anyone with a shred of common sense would say "gee, maybe it's the drug."

I'm glad to hear Nystatin helped you, but it doesn't mean it's the right medicine for everyone. People die of bacterial infections, but they also die from penicillin allergy. Like antibiotics, Nystatin is somewhat overprescribed. I just think Albion needs to talk to her doctor to make sure the reactions are still Herxheimer and not a allergic sensitization or irritation/toxicity issue.

So sorry! I did not want to start an argument. I have just been very despairing about the treatment. I was taking a sugar-loaded version of Nystatin (used for infants with thrush, it turns out!) and I feel like I didn't make any progress for the 2 months I was taking it.

My die off has been worse over the last few days with Caprylic Acid, so I am thinking I am just very sensitive to the chemicals the yeast lets go of when it dies. I am going to have my doctor do a stool culture to see what we are actually dealing with now. Did I make it worse? Is it just the same? Maybe a little better?

That brings me to my next question....what type of stool test is best for detecting candida? My celiac panel was done by a blood test and that was conclusive. I am not sure the same is true for candida.

Thanks to all of you that have been helping. I live alone with this and the isolation is tremendous and painful.

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So sorry! I did not want to start an argument. I have just been very despairing about the treatment. I was taking a sugar-loaded version of Nystatin (used for infants with thrush, it turns out!) and I feel like I didn't make any progress for the 2 months I was taking it.

My die off has been worse over the last few days with Caprylic Acid, so I am thinking I am just very sensitive to the chemicals the yeast lets go of when it dies. I am going to have my doctor do a stool culture to see what we are actually dealing with now. Did I make it worse? Is it just the same? Maybe a little better?

That brings me to my next question....what type of stool test is best for detecting candida? My celiac panel was done by a blood test and that was conclusive. I am not sure the same is true for candida.

Thanks to all of you that have been helping. I live alone with this and the isolation is tremendous and painful.

You have no need to apologize for an argument that didn't happen. I was not offended by Skylark's remark...I just think it was overreaction to a statement I made that I stand by. You are correct....the Nystatin in oral suspension will help to keep you sick if it is a true candida because it's all sugar. You may have a tough time in the beginning because of die off...that's what happened to me. It wasn't the Nystatin that made me feel bad, it was the die off. After about 2 months, things got a lot better. With continued use, I felt great.

Just make sure you go to a reputable doctor to be diagnosed and treated for it. I am not sure of specific testing but most doctors who deal with this problem will know what tests to run. Mine were done almost 20 years ago so I can't remember specifics. It takes a long time to combat a systemic candida problem, much like Celiac. It can take almost a year to eradicate it from your system.

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I have had Candidiasis twice now. I was treated two years ago, followed the diet religiously, took Nystatin for three months. My doctor told me I could go back to eating normal foods. I got sick again. I have a new provider at the clinic, she is the founder of the clinic (my other provider left).  My new provider has diagnosed me as having the Candidiasis back again as well as discovering I have Celiac Disease. She has me on the diet for both Celiac Disease and for Candidiasis. Both doctors have/had the Nystatin compounded for me so that it would not have added sugar.  This time, I took Diflucan for one month and then had to wait for my gut to get healthy enough to take Nystatin. My doctor explained that the Celiac Disease and the Candidiasis are not strangers to each other.  She told me I never should have gone back to eating sugar. Is that true? Do people who have had Candidiasis and Celiac Disease have to restrict sugar forever.  Or, is she just a real perfectionist. I mean, no sugar at all. I am also not to eat any processed food or gluten. A ton of other restrictions too. No mold, fungi, cheese, vinegar, soy, and so forth and so on.
This is an old post, probably none of you will even see this reply. I just wondered if any of you had resumed eating sugar. If so, in what amounts. Does the Candidiasis keep coming back? Please let me know what your outcomes were. Thank you.

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15 hours ago, Lisa Purcell said:

I have had Candidiasis twice now. I was treated two years ago, followed the diet religiously, took Nystatin for three months. My doctor told me I could go back to eating normal foods. I got sick again. I have a new provider at the clinic, she is the founder of the clinic (my other provider left).  My new provider has diagnosed me as having the Candidiasis back again as well as discovering I have Celiac Disease. She has me on the diet for both Celiac Disease and for Candidiasis. Both doctors have/had the Nystatin compounded for me so that it would not have added sugar.  This time, I took Diflucan for one month and then had to wait for my gut to get healthy enough to take Nystatin. My doctor explained that the Celiac Disease and the Candidiasis are not strangers to each other.  She told me I never should have gone back to eating sugar. Is that true? Do people who have had Candidiasis and Celiac Disease have to restrict sugar forever.  Or, is she just a real perfectionist. I mean, no sugar at all. I am also not to eat any processed food or gluten. A ton of other restrictions too. No mold, fungi, cheese, vinegar, soy, and so forth and so on.
This is an old post, probably none of you will even see this reply. I just wondered if any of you had resumed eating sugar. If so, in what amounts. Does the Candidiasis keep coming back? Please let me know what your outcomes were. Thank you.

Hello Lisa......I am another Lisa.  I have met a lot of people with Celiac whose names are Lisa so it has been joked around here that having the name of Lisa is a symptom of Celiac Disease.  :P

On to your question.......I have had candida and was diagnosed with Celiac in 2005.  Your doctor is correct......the two problems are not strangers to each other.  I believe that systemic candida problems can result from years of undiagnosed Celiac and the resultant leaky gut and annihilation of good gut bacteria. It's the good bacteria that keep yeast in check so it's not a stretch to think that one can be the result of the other.  I would add that I saw a real MD about this issue and not a naturopath. I had chronic thrush which would not go away until I used an anti-fungal and followed the candida diet. I initially felt fantastic after following the diet for about 2 years but then the Celiac symptoms reared their ugly heads and I got sick all over again.  No return of thrush but all those other horrible gastric problems that go hand in hand with Celiac.

I did not take Nystatin for 2 years......just long enough for all my symptoms to go away and then the diet alone to bolster healing.  I also used DiFlucan for about 2 weeks when the worst of the die off was happening. Yes, these meds are not something to use without medical supervision but systemic candida can really do a number on you too.  I don't think many people understand how badly it can mess you up.

The end result has been, between the treatment I did for candida and the diagnosis of my Celiac and following a strict gluten-free diet, that I can consume sugar without any return of symptoms.  I will say that my consumption of sugar is low and I am not snacking on sugar all day, like many people do.  I tend to crave a cookie or two in the evening, with my tea. I have taken probiotics for about 30 years now so keep up with that. I will pig out on Thanksgiving, like everyone else, and not worry about it. That means pie.  ;)

The restrictions this doctor has you on is really meant for the treatment phase. I eat cheese, vinegar and soy with no problems. I do not go overboard with sugar but enjoy some every day. I could not stay on that diet forever because I struggle to keep weight on so was strict with it for treatment only. I eased back into those forbidden foods gradually with good results. I think as you have the Celiac diagnosis also, once you get your gut back into good working order, you could try and introduce those foods when you find your gut feeling a lot better with no symptoms. Good probiotics are essential to repopulate your gut. The root cause of this problem is the Celiac so once that is taken care of, everything should heal.  Just don't tell the doc, if you think it will create an argument. I was successful in adding sugar back into my diet, in reasonable amounts.....not the amounts that mainstream Americans are eating it.  You will also find you can be satisfied with smaller amounts because you are going to feel so good after doing this, you won't want to return to feeling like crap from eating too much sugar.  The first real dessert I ate in a restaurant after about 2 years of having little to no sugar (only the sugar that happens from breaking down complex carbs) I was so buzzed, I could not sleep all night. That is what too much sugar will do!  :o

One more thing.......do not think you have to give up sugar for 2 years. You might heal faster.  I healed well enough but wanted to ensure the thrush would not return so I ditched the sugar for longer than I probably had to. Give it at least 6 months and see how you do but I am guessing that the undiagnosed Celiac had a lot to do with you relapsing.

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Posted (edited)

I took Nystatin powder 1/2 tsp twice a day mixed with water. 5 days later I was nearly dead from dehydration, malabsorption from GI damage. It stripped 3 layers of my intestinal tract. Even the villai were damaged. That was in 1988. I was very fortunate that the villae grew back (5 years at 1mm per year).

I survived on Ensure Plus and Gatorade for two years. It was ten years before I could eat normally again and actually absorb food.

Do your homework. Be careful. I’ve suffered many years because of the malabsorption and malnutrition for ten years. Be smart; not extreme.

 

Edited by Coachamya
Misspelled word

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    Roxanne Bracknell
    Celiac.com 06/22/2018 - The rise of food allergies means that many people are avoiding gluten in recent times. In fact, the number of Americans who have stopped eating gluten has tripled in eight years between 2009 and 2017.
    Whatever your rationale for avoiding gluten, whether its celiac disease, a sensitivity to the protein, or any other reason, it can be really hard to find suitable places to eat out. When you’re on holiday in a new and unknown environment, this can be near impossible. As awareness of celiac disease grows around the world, however, more and more cities are opening their doors to gluten-free lifestyles, none more so than the 10 locations on the list below.
    Perhaps unsurprisingly, the U.S is a hotbed of gluten-free options, with four cities making the top 10, as well as the Hawaiian island of Maui. Chicago, in particular, is a real haven of gluten-free fare, with 240 coeliac-safe eateries throughout this huge city. The super hip city of Portland also ranks highly on this list, with the capital of counterculture rich in gluten-free cuisine, with San Francisco and Denver also included. Outside of the states, several prominent European capitals also rank very highly on the list, including Prague, the picturesque and historic capital of the Czech Republic, which boasts the best-reviewed restaurants on this list.
    The Irish capital of Dublin, meanwhile, has the most gluten-free establishments, with a huge 330 to choose from, while Amsterdam and Barcelona also feature prominently thanks to their variety of top-notch gluten-free fodder.
    Finally, a special mention must go to Auckland, the sole representative of Australasia in this list, with the largest city in New Zealand rounding out the top 10 thanks to its 180 coeliacsafe eateries.
    The full top ten gluten-free cities are shown in the graphic below:
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

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    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au