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kaygato

New To Celiac, Can I Have Oats?

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I most likely don't have celiac, but testing says I'm sensitive to it so I started an elimination diet 4 days ago. I also was sensitive to a lot of other foods, most notably yeast, dairy, soy, egg yolk, and a couple veggies, nuts, and most seafood.

Anyway, I've been lurking around the forums for the past couple months, and I've seen conflicting opinions on oats. A lot of people said there was high risk of cross contamination with wheat, but that certified gluten free oats should be ok. Since I'm just starting to go gluten free and really want to see if it makes me feel better, I'd like to avoid gluten as much as possible. I feel like it would be best to stop eating oats, because I'm scared of cross-contamination and the effect it could have on the results.

Anyway, most of you have more experience than me, so what do you think about oats? Also, what are the main causes of cross-contamination, and what products should make me suspicious?

And one last question, can cross contamination interfere with the results of an elimination diet and keep me from feeling improvement on the diet?

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I'd suggest eliminating oats for now. There is not only a CC issue, but some folks with celiac are sensitive to them because they're so closely related to wheat and barley. You can always try certified gluten-free oats like Bob's Red Mill after you're feeling better.

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I would only eat oats labled as gluten-free. Problem is not so much in the oat itself, we all have our sensativities, but unless labeled gluten-free you are at risk of oats being processed in the same machine as other foods containing gluten.

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Oats are only safe to eat if they were grown and processed in a wheat/rye/barley-free environment. Always look for a gluten-free logo on oats.

My personal experience with oats is very good: I eat oat-products on a daily basis. A Dutch company has a product line of oat bread (which is very soft and tasty) and I often have oat flakes for breakfast. To me it's a great source of fiber and low-GI carbs.

There are coeliacs who react to other grains as well, I know people on the Dutch coeliac forum who are sensitive to oats, teff or buckwheat as well. Eating these products causes no damage to them, but brings discomfort like indigestion.

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I agree with waiting on trying the oats for awhile. When you are ready to introduce them I would only get certified gluten free oats. I waited until i was 7 months gluten free to try them. OH BOY, I was not happy. I reacted horrible to them, just as bad as wheat, barley and rye. Unfortunately I was unaware of gluten free oat cross contamination(CC) so I continued to eat other products that were CC'd with them. I eventually became sick and had symptoms for 8 months straight. I did a further elimination and that's when I realized I was reacting to even the Oat cross contamination. So for me this eliminates a lot of gluten free products even.

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I agree with waiting on trying the oats for awhile. When you are ready to introduce them I would only get certified gluten free oats. I waited until i was 7 months gluten free to try them. OH BOY, I was not happy. I reacted horrible to them, just as bad as wheat, barley and rye. Unfortunately I was unaware of gluten free oat cross contamination(CC) so I continued to eat other products that were CC'd with them. I eventually became sick and had symptoms for 8 months straight. I did a further elimination and that's when I realized I was reacting to even the Oat cross contamination. So for me this eliminates a lot of gluten free products even.

As a general rule Celiacs are advised to avoid Gluten Free Oats until their Villi have healed, this can take anything up to 2 yrs to complete.

If the villi are healed (no longer flattened) then it's suggested to initially restrict yourself to 50g per week. (this includes oatmeal, cookies that may contain Gluten Free Oat Flour, or Oat Cakes).

3 heaped Tablespoons of Gluten Free oats = approx 25g.

50g of Gluten Free Oats would convert to 2 hearty bowls of Oatmeal per week.

You can then gradually increase the amount and see if you still tolerate larger amounts.

My Villi have benefited from a strict Gluten Free Diet over 7yrs and I can tolerate oatmeal 4-5 times a week + cookies and oatcakes.

I've had additional Colonoscopies and my Villi are normal, but this may not hold true for everyone.

That's a matter for you, your dietician and Celiac consultant.

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I would only eat oats labled as gluten-free. Problem is not so much in the oat itself, we all have our sensativities, but unless labeled gluten-free you are at risk of oats being processed in the same machine as other foods containing gluten.

No, for some celiacs like Roda the problem is the oat itself. There are studies where celiacs eating pure oats with no gluten CC had antibodies and villous atrophy.

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No, for some celiacs like Roda the problem is the oat itself. There are studies where celiacs eating pure oats with no gluten CC had antibodies and villous atrophy.

It will be interesting when I have my blood work redone in Feb. My tTG has been normal since 6 months gltuen free but I have had continued elevated IgG gliadin. They kept telling me gluten was getting into my diet. I'm hoping it will be normal now that I have eliminated all gluten free oat CC(It has been 1 year 4 months now since I eliminated it and had blood work) The unfortunate thing about not realizing the CC for so long is that I think I have some permanant deficiencies, mainly pancreatic enzymes.

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I get sick from oats if they aren't gluten-free Oats.

I really like the Glutenfreeda Instant Oatmeal that Whole Foods and some Safeway's carry. They say it is made in a gluten-free facility with certified gluten-free oats.

As to your question of whether oats are safe for you, it depends on what you are sensitive to. The following is my understanding although I am not an expert at this.

Prolamins:

gliadin - wheat

hordein - barley

secalin - rye

zein - corn

kafirin - sorghum

avenin - oats

Glutelins

glutenin - wheat

hordeum - barley

secale - rye

The combination of prolamin plus glutelin in wheat, barley, and rye is what is classically called gluten. However, sometimes prolamins are referred to as gluten like referring to corn zein as corn gluten.

Some people are only sensitive to glutelins or a combination of glutelin plus prolamin. Other people seem sensitive to all glutelins and prolamins. People with wheat allergies are sometimes also allergic to the albumin and globulin proteins in wheat and other triticeae grasses.

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