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Strawberry_Jam

Celiac Resources In Other Languages

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I don't expect anyone here to be able to help me, but I thought I would ask.

I'm dating an Ethiopian boy at the moment and he doesn't quite "get" ceoliac disease. He accepts that bread, beer, dairy, and soya makes me sick, and he knows I won't kiss him if he has beer or bread so he'll get something else.

However he seems to think that it's something that you can maybe cure through pure willpower.

I thought maybe if he could read a scientific explanation in his own language (Amharic) it will make more sense to him. In Ethiopia they don't really have celiac disease or even many allergies so that's why he's not getting it. certainly our terrible Western diets make us have more allergies and digestive ailments than other people.

Just thought I would ask. So far my amharic skills consist of, like, hello and thank you.

anyway. if you can't help that's fine.

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Have you seen if you could find an online translation site? Something you could put English into and it would translate into his language?

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My DH is not a native English speaker. There is a fair amount of info available in his native language but he is very busy at work with very little down time so it takes him a long time to catch up and educate himself, add in the usual factors/obstacles that even a native speaking partner goes thru...at some point he catches up a bit but there is always some lag time so I keep doing what I need to to be safe.

This site offers various languages http://www.selectwisely.com/selectwisely/products/cards/gluten_free/fc000007.htm

as does Triumph dining.

But, I live with one foot in each of two cultures so I "get it" that some just don't "get it" as a result of cultural differences and lack of info. Much the same could be said of our own culture and language ;) In the culture I am part of now, it is standard to not be the nail that sticks up, everyone tries to be the same, or tries to appear to be so.

Sometimes, more important than understanding is accepting. It needs to be communicated that even if you don't understand, these are the absolute ground rules that can't be broken. Accept it for my sake.

I have a severe allergy that not many understand, native speaker or not, but I have to just lay down the rule that we just don't do X, Y or z. Period. I had to ask my DH to go forward and ask a leader of the church(of the other culture/language) in the middle of the church service today to remove something from the room that his kid had because I have a severe allergy to it. You do what you need to do to be safe and try to be respectful, if possible.

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restaurant cards are no good because his English is pretty fluent, so he understands that amount of info already. I wanted something more scientific that explains the causes and effects of celiac in a way that shows how it is purely biological. idk.

translation sites on the internet are crap. as someone who studied japanese for 5 years, you can use it for a word or two but for any language that is not closely related to your own, you're gonna get gibberish.

I do admit that english > german, french, italian, even swedish is pretty decent on google translate. English > latin or Japanese (the two languages I've studied) comes out totally weird. English > Amharic would probably be much worse.

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I just thought I'd post the link anyway. Didn't think it would help you. Maybe it will help someone else who reads this post. Japanese is our other language/culture so I know exactly what you mean when you mention the translations-it's impossible to read, even when you know the person and how they talk and you try to use the online translation for things they post in their language on their blogs etc. Even the simplest sentence is garbly gook and impossible to figure out.

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haha when you were talking about not being the nail that sticks up I guessed maybe you were talking about Japanese culture. I lived in Japan for 6 years so I kinda know what you're on about. ^^

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