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Avalon451

First Day Gluten-Free

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...well, for my kids, anyway. I see the GI doc next Friday, and I'm hoping to talk him into an endoscopy, since my bloodwork was kind of inconclusive but my symptoms are fairly obvious. I'm staying glutened for now in hopes of a positive diagnosis.

Such mixed feelings. On the one hand I'm excited to see my girls and I start to feel better. On the other hand, I'm wondering how I'm going to deal with this farther down the line, after the euphoria of knowing what's wrong with us wears off, and the reality of "no more ______ (fill in the blank), EVER."

I filled a box with gluten-y products from our pantry to give away. I put the flour back in the bag from my pretty blue and white flour crock, and washed it carefully, and put it in the dishwasher. As I washed it out I could only think of how I've spent so many hours since I was a child, baking wonderful things for friends and family, becoming known for my pies and cookies. I know, I know, I can learn to do that with gluten-free alternatives. I'm not looking forward to having people say things like, "Not bad, for gluten-free," where they used to say, "This is fabulous, can I have the recipe?"

My kids happily tucked into beef stew and drop biscuits made from Pamela's pancake mix. "Not bad, for gluten-free." Their tummies are full of food that won't hurt them, there's plenty of delicious and healthy food around the house that is safe. That's a good feeling.

So I'm trying to have an upbeat attitude about this. I'm predicting that it's going to get harder before it gets easier, though.

Just venting. Thanks for listening.

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Such mixed feelings. On the one hand I'm excited to see my girls and I start to feel better. On the other hand, I'm wondering how I'm going to deal with this farther down the line, after the euphoria of knowing what's wrong with us wears off, and the reality of "no more ______ (fill in the blank), EVER."

I filled a box with gluten-y products from our pantry to give away. I put the flour back in the bag from my pretty blue and white flour crock, and washed it carefully, and put it in the dishwasher. As I washed it out I could only think of how I've spent so many hours since I was a child, baking wonderful things for friends and family, becoming known for my pies and cookies. I know, I know, I can learn to do that with gluten-free alternatives. I'm not looking forward to having people say things like, "Not bad, for gluten-free," where they used to say, "This is fabulous, can I have the recipe?"

I think it will get a lot easier for you as it's all pretty overwhelming right away. A lot of the meals I make now are things I've eaten all my life...sometimes as is, sometimes with minor adjustments.

Yes, baking is a whole new ballgame but that said, there's not a lot that can't be made gluten-free and be mighty tasty, too. So concentrate on those things you can have and don't go for a lot of prepared foods that are gluten-free substitutes for those things you previously bought. Most are terribly expensive and many are just not that good.

You can also search the recipe forum and you'll know in a heartbeat that we can eat very well and probably better than the majority of people by eliminating a lot of processed foods in the *sad* American diet.

I've had gluten-eating friends ask for recipes...so when you say, "no more ______ (fill in the blank), EVER", just ask and I'll bet you'll get a lot of responses to very tasty gluten-free food. Think pizza, flourless chocolate cake, peanut butter cookies, etc. so good that that even gluten-eaters will love them. Pamela's baking and pancake mix makes very good waffles and of course, pancakes, too.

Good luck on your testing...I hope you get the answers you're looking for.

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Something my husband said to me a few months after my diagnosis when I was trying to fool with a recipe to make it taste a certain way.

"Appreciate food for what it is, not for what it's trying to mimic."

You're going to have a lot of mixed feelings and there will be times when you're perfectly OK with everything and other moments of frustration. All completely normal.

Good luck. :)

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Avalon, I just noticed the ages of your daughters...I'd say, get them involved in cooking and/or baking as girls that ages enjoy doing that. My 13-year old gluten-eating granddaughter just loves to make gluten-free pizza. And she's good at it. When she spends the night, she knows that we'll eat very, very well...all gluten-free, of course.

Katrala, I'm still trying to *mimic* gluten-free bread. :lol: :lol: :lol:

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You will find lots of recipes that people will say, "That's fabulous, can I have the recipe?" It just takes time and experimenting. If you don't mention that something is gluten-free, people usually won't notice the difference, and you'll get as many compliments as ever, once you find the flours and recipes that work really well for you.

Just take it one day at a time, focus on all the great things you can have, and look on it as an adventure in cookery. I have actually become more creative with cooking and baking since starting the diet and enjoy it more than I used to. Although I admit, I created some pretty ghastly failures in the beginning!

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You are doing great. Stay focused on what you CAN eat, which is plenty of great food. I like to tell my friends that champagne, caviar, and truffles are gluten-free. ;)

Many of us do have a time when we realize the permanence and enormity of the diet. I'd encourage you to come vent here, and don't try to ignore those feelings. Allowing yourself to grieve if/when that time comes is the easiest way to move on and get back to making great beef stew. By the way, the gluten-free Bisquick is a little pricey but it makes fantastic drop biscuits.

By the way, I still get "This is fabulous, can I have the recipe?" Like Sylvia, I make an ultra-rich flourless chocolate cake everyone loves. I also make flourless peanut butter cookies that go over well at parties. Flan, creme brulee, chocolate mousse, and rice pudding are naturally gluten-free too. I also got requests for the recipe when I made a crustless spinach quiche for a brunch.

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I still smile when I remember "the renowned baker" in our neighbourhood saying, "OMG, who made this fabulous almond cake?" and the look on her face when she realized it was gluten free :D Those days will come.

I agree with Sylvia, get your girls involved in baking - especially since they are going to have to learn to cook, more so than most people.

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