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Tamesis

What To Get Rid Of.....

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I'm finally accepting that I need to be hardcore with CC, as I've got a rash that is strangely DH like, and it must be due to CC. :( Anyways....So i've gutted the kitchen, and just have a few questions on how to make sure it's really de-glutened.

What cookware to I need to worry about? I have some bake ware that really looks brand new, doesn't seem obviously scratched? I have some Wilton bake ware products (I was hard-core into cake decorating) that don't have a Teflon type coating, it's very light silver?

My pots are all stainless steel....Should be ok? I'm going to run them all through a hard core dishwasher setting.

Plastic ware? Gladware and such? Plastic cutting boards? I know the wooden one for sure.... My daughters high chair tray is plastic and it's scratched? (She's eating gluten-free too), Silicone spatulas? What about the flipper type spatulas, the hard plastic type? Wisks? Pizza cutters? Pampered Chef stoneware? Baking-cooling racks?

Sorry for all the annoyances....I'm just feeling incredibly self-deprecating and overwhelmed. :(

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I remember cleaning out kitchen when we went gluten-free. There are many that will tell you to toss many of the items you mentioned. But I was on a very tight budget so I scrubbed all cooking utensils, bakeware (including silicone baking cups to metal and glass pans of all sizes). After I scrubbed the items I ran them thru the pots and pans cycle of the dishwasher -- oh I turned my water heater up to highest setting for the day so the dishwasher was running on extra hot water. I even put electric appliances in the dishwasher and then let them dry for several days before plugging them back in -- didn't lose as single one!

We did buy a new toaster...couldn't figure out how to clean that.

Oh and my cutting board was a hand made family heirloom so my husband sanded it down and then I washed it with VERY hot water.

It may have been easier to buy all new items, but it is possible to clean what you have -- just takes a lot of elbow grease and a FULL day.

Good Luck...it does get easier :)

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One additional quick suggestion - if you own an electric can opener, clean the disk/wheel thing very well as this could easily contaminate. I would also recommend cleaning the cutlery drawer thoroughly.

I did not replace my baking stone as it was meticulously scrubbed. I did purchase new colanders, however, as well as a few fine-mesh sieves.

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Terrific suggestion love2 about the can opener. I wonder how many people get glutened by a can opener? Hmmmmm.... makes me wonder about restaurants.blink.gif

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I'm currently unemployed, so replacing much of anything isn't really in my budget, though I had to get rid of a nonstick griddle pan, which when I gave it to my brother he said it looked like new. I don't have a dishwasher though, and apparently giving it a good scrub with a plastic scrubbie (like a scotch-brite pad) didn't make it safe.

But I'm keeping my nonstick cookie sheets for now and will use parchment paper on them. And my baker's secret muffin tins, I'll use paper muffin cups with those. I used an SOS (steel wool) pad to scrub and re-scrub my 2 aluminum colanders (about 3 times), and scrubbed the ends of a couple spatulas also, and then threw out several items when I cleaned out my silverware drawer. My pots and pans are pretty much all stainless steel, they got an extra good scrub too but they've been fine. I also replaced my ancient toaster oven.

One other thing to clean is cupboard handles and the areas around the handles, especially the ones you may have opened to grab your vanilla or baking powder or spices while cooking.

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My main symptom now is the rash. Whenever I get it due to glutening, I have to cut out eggs, anything high in iodine can make your rash worse or cause it to linger on. I am pretty successful with just eggs, but you may have to cut out sodium and dairy, the DH board has good advice on this.

My last glutening my rash lingered for 5 weeks...and its still broken skin where it was, but the rash is gone at least.

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Great advice, thanks everyone! I NEVER would have thought to wash down the handles to cupboards I would have touched while baking! I also washed the outside of sugar, etc. containers....I never would have used a measuring cup in the container, but again, who's to say I didn't touch it with a gluteny hand! And the can opener....Wow, again, I'm glad I asked! I knew it would be something you guys touch on DAILY with new people, but I figured some extra 'eyes' in my kitchen would help! :)

I took this as a bit of an excuse to replace some of the kitchen stuff i've been wanting to. ;) I've gotten rid of all the questionable items, and replaced spatulas, and just a couple of baking sheets and frying pans.....I had more than I needed anyways. I'll slowly work on the rest, such as maybe a new sandwich maker and waffle maker :) DH has a little cupboard of Glutenous stuff, completely separate from any other dishware, so impossible to mix up.

I also called all the spice companies, and found there's only ONE that I can't use, my favorite though...Taco seasoning! :P But, thankful I don't have to completely replace all my spices!

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Don't forget to wash the fridge/freezer inside & out & don't forget the handle.

I think there's a gluten-free taco seasoning. Seems I recall someone posting about it. Use the search function for the forum. It's located in the header of each page.

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For taco seasoning check out Old El Paso. It is a General Mills brand, so any gluten will be clearly disclosed in the ingredients by naming the grain.

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Oh that's very good to know Peter. I just had a taco minus the taco shell & salsa & taco sauce today for lunch as i wasn't sure about taco stuff yet.

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Gluten in Salsa? really?! I didn't even think it might be, and haven't even checked...I don't understand why they have to put gluten in all these yummy, pure foods!!! I've always bought the bulk taco seasoning, but i'll definitely start checking the packets of Old El Paso, thanks! I have done the fridge inside and out, but the freezer will always be a contaminated zone, so i'll just have to be extra careful to wash. :( DH isn't ready to give up his glutenous pre-made goodies! We're working on getting the bottom shelf glutenous, the rest non - but it's taking him some time to eat through it all, as i'm cooking so much more now! LOL

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You have to look EVERYWHERE for gluten Tamesis! It lurks in soooooooo many foods. Salad dressings, bullion cubes (some yes, some no). Check everything! Print out the safe & unsafe list from this site & keep a copy in the kitchen & take a copy in your purse for the grocery store. Go through all your cupboards & read all ingredients on every label & take a big magic marker & mark all things you find to be gluten free with a big "gluten-free". Also you need to check labels everytime you buy a product even if you use it regularly because manufacturers change recipes & they don't always say "new recipe" on the label. Minefields. There are minefields out there!ph34r.gif

Also, for the hubbys gluten food in the freezer ~~~ get gal. size ziplock baggies & put his stuff in them & then into the freezer. That helps to keep the gluten from spreading around.

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Quite frankly I am quite surprised that pre-celiac disease cookware has to be eliminated...I didn't think gluten would survive the regular, daily cleaning process of dishes, cookware, silverware, etc...am I wrong about that? I don't see how it could.

As far as gluten in the diet, your best new friend is the internet and google searches. Personally, now I don't eat ANYTHING that doesn't have one of the gluten free symbols on it (and there are several), except for the raw foods of course.

But I search it all on the web. Even in the past year or so when I had to go gluten free, more and more stuff is being labeled or becoming available for celiacs.

Good luck in your gluten free quest!

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Quite frankly I am quite surprised that pre-celiac disease cookware has to be eliminated...I didn't think gluten would survive the regular, daily cleaning process of dishes, cookware, silverware, etc...am I wrong about that? I don't see how it could.

As far as gluten in the diet, your best new friend is the internet and google searches. Personally, now I don't eat ANYTHING that doesn't have one of the gluten free symbols on it (and there are several), except for the raw foods of course.

But I search it all on the web. Even in the past year or so when I had to go gluten free, more and more stuff is being labeled or becoming available for celiacs.

Good luck in your gluten free quest!

Lucky, No, not things like silverware or stainless pots & pans or plates & glasses & bowls but scratched teflon, wooden spoons & such where gluten may lurk.

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Lucky, No, not things like silverware or stainless pots & pans or plates & glasses & bowls but scratched teflon, wooden spoons & such where gluten may lurk.

I guess I would have to ask one question on that point then: How long does one think molecules of gluten can survive on a plastic cutting board that gets washed every time? Well-kept but not perfect non-stick Teflon that gets washed?

Seasoned cast-iron cookware...although I guess nothing with gluten goes in my cast-iron skillets anyway, or hasn't for about a year or more.

Maybe I'm thinking about it too hard.

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I don't know but there are those who say it is so. I was just answering your question.

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When I first went gluten-free, in 2000, nobody told me about wooden utensils, plastic containers, or non-stick cookware. We just washed as usual and moved forward. And washed, and washed, as usual, after each use. Somehow, I managed to recover and test as fully in remission six years later. So, in retrospect, I would take the advice with a grain of salt.

Non-stick cookware has been on gluten lists as long as there have been lists. I remember the first-generation Teflon pans in the 1960s. They would scratch if you looked at them while holding a metal utensil. Today's cookware has changed dramatically in the half-century since it first appeared. It is very robust, and I would just wash them thoroughly.

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I don't know but there are those who say it is so. I was just answering your question.

Um, just which question are you making reference to in this?

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I guess I would have to ask one question on that point then: How long does one think molecules of gluten can survive on a plastic cutting board that gets washed every time? Well-kept but not perfect non-stick Teflon that gets washed?

Seasoned cast-iron cookware...although I guess nothing with gluten goes in my cast-iron skillets anyway, or hasn't for about a year or more.

Maybe I'm thinking about it too hard.

This question Peter. And you answered it for lucky97.

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This question Peter. And you answered it for lucky97.

TY :)

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I scrubbed out my cast iron pan with steel wool, and then boiled soapy water in it for a while. It was fine. Same with my stainless steel pots and pans. Got a new colander though because I couldn't see how to clean inside all those little holes completely. Wood is a very porus material so I think it is possible it could hold gluten particles for a while. A good dose of heavy sand paper might fix that though. Usually wooden utensils and such are not so expensive that they can't be replaced versus sanding and such. Plastic also can be easily scratched and have many little tiny scratches in the surface that are not easy to see. That could be a place for gluten to hide and be hard to remove by washing, IMHO. So I chucked that stuff and got new or metal utensils.

It's getting harder to find plain stainless steel spatulas without the stupid anti-stick coatings. I think I'll hit the Salvation Army or Goodwill for my next one....Trailing of as I wander around the bend of the lost topic trail... :)

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We have twins who will in all likelihood be confirmed Celiac next week. We also are scouring our house for gluten (we're going to have an entire house gluten-free since we have at least 50% of the family being identified as Celiac)

Questions and plans we have are:

- how long does gluten stay "alive"?

- what does it take to kill or inactivate gluten? hot water? bleach(ick)?

- I'm thinking of sanding/refinishing our kitchen table since it has so many grooves in it and kids got crumbs/playdoh/etc. all over it! Am I crazy ;)?

Also on my list:

- Get rid of playdoh

- Wash out kids play teaset

- Wash out dog dishes

- Replace dog food to be gluten-free, check dog treats

- Check medicines/otc/toothpaste

- Check soaps/hair care/lotions

- Check kids play makeup or replace

- Throw out those old sponges under the sink I keep to clean really dirty stuff ;)

- Replace oven racks?

Anything else I'm missing?

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I also called all the spice companies, and found there's only ONE that I can't use, my favorite though...Taco seasoning! :P But, thankful I don't have to completely replace all my spices!

FYI, when I was diagnosed last August I found out that Penzey's Spices are all gluten free including all their blends. The only thing they said wasn't gluten free was their soup stock bases which are produced by another supplier. I was so happy I didn't have to pitch any of my spices (although I did replace all the ones that I used for baking and recipes that were flour-heavy as I wasn't sure about cross contamination from double-dipping spoons, sitting open on the counter while measuring/mixing/etc.)

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