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gilly31

Are Gluten-Free Pots, Pans, Utensils, Plates Really Necessary?

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Hi all,

I am two weeks gluten-free following diagnosis by biopsy. I am having a hard time understanding how careful I really need to be. My fiancee still eats gluten and although we now have dedicated gluten areas for his gluten foods, I'm wondering if it's really necessary to have separate pots, pans, utensils, plates etc. It seems highly unlikely that enough gluten is going to remain on these items after a careful washing and the dishwasher to make me sick. Do I really need to be so vigilant that my fiancee and I can't eat from the same dishes and use the same pots and pans? I'm desperate to feel better, so if the answer is yes, then I'll do it. I just feel like I need some guidance about all of this.

Thanks for your help!!

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Hi all,

I am two weeks gluten-free following diagnosis by biopsy. I am having a hard time understanding how careful I really need to be. My fiancee still eats gluten and although we now have dedicated gluten areas for his gluten foods, I'm wondering if it's really necessary to have separate pots, pans, utensils, plates etc. It seems highly unlikely that enough gluten is going to remain on these items after a careful washing and the dishwasher to make me sick. Do I really need to be so vigilant that my fiancee and I can't eat from the same dishes and use the same pots and pans? I'm desperate to feel better, so if the answer is yes, then I'll do it. I just feel like I need some guidance about all of this.

Thanks for your help!!

I am a firm believer that a good hand rinse and a run in the dishwasher is good enough.

I would replace your scratched Teflon pots and pans. But I would do that gluten free or not. A private toaster is a must and I have a separate colander for my gluten free pasta.

And make sure your fiancee is good about cleaning up after himself. And no smooching after gluten. B)

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A modern dishwasher will do a fine job of cleaning most items. We had a mixed-use kitchen for years without any trouble. Thorough rinsing prior to placing contaminated items in the dishwasher will help.

A few things to be careful of, though:

A pot used regularly to boil pasta is likely to develop stuck-on residue that the dishwasher cannot remove. Elbow grease and steel wool works. Thoroughly clean it once, and never use regular pasta again.

Porous items, such as wooden spoons, will retain gluten from direct contact. Segregate (or avoid) them. Wire mesh sieves and the like trap matter (gluten) in the mesh.

Items that are visibly scratched should be replaced.

Unless you are very disciplined about NEVER double dipping, you should have dedicated containers of peanut butter, margarine, butter, mayo, mustard, etc. Otherwise the knife used to spread onto wheat bread can transfer crumbs when one dip isn't enough. Some condiments can be bought in squeeze bottles, which eliminates the problem.

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I got sick from a cutting board that had gone through dishwasher after being set on top of my husband's pizza stone. What you need separate and gluten free really depends on what it is. I wouldn't go anywhere near a non-stick pan anyone else uses because without fail they seem to always be scratched up, if they aren't scratched I'd think they'd be safe. I also don't share anything plastic since everyone in the house loves to leave plastic utensils sitting in hot pans nothing would last long without being damaged and leaving many areas for gluten to hide in. I have been using the same glass dishes and metal utensils without issue. (Although after a week of being sick I discovered today that someone is putting gluteny sponges in the dishwasher with the silverware, GAH!!!) I may simply be overly paranoid but it is simply my opinion that there is no such thing as too careful. Keep in mind also that some people are simply far more sensitive than others. While minor traces may not make you visibly ill and could make someone else deathly ill, you're still damaging your villi.

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I guess you will get a variety of replies...everyone has different comfort levels.

Most likely, you will have to find your level by trial and error. Be conservative at first, until you have some healing and education under your belt...then see how it goes one step at a time.

But I have know others who have used this as a excuse to buy some really nice quality pots and pans. :rolleyes:

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We use the same pots/pans/utensils/storage containers/etc. I have a gluten cutting board and a gluten free cutting board. We only have gluten free pasta now so only one colandar but I would have a separate one of those. I put aluminum foil on my baking sheet when I'm making my son a corn dog or gluten chicken nuggets . . . even though I can wash that off, I do it because it's easy and I don't have to worry about it. I now have two separate small teflon skillets. I "shared" in the beginning, but as they have started to show a little wear, I have made one gluten free and one not. Two toasters . . . which I hate taking up space on the counter but we are BIG toast eaters here, so it makes sense just to leave them out. My mixer is gluten free . . . I only bake gluten free but I did replace my stand mixer (used it as an excuse to upgrade to a Kitchen Aid :rolleyes: ) because you can see how the flour gets sprayed/poofed up into it (Maybe other people don't have a problem with that . . . or I may just do a poor job of cleaning up after my baking sessions :ph34r: )

I have always pretty much washed the plates/pans before they go into the dishwasher. The dishwasher is just a sanitizer for me.

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I guess you will get a variety of replies...everyone has different comfort levels.

This is so true!

I only kept a separate cutting board and toaster when I had a roommate. I trust my dishwasher and trusty scrubber to get gluten off plates and pots.

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I haven't read all the replies but I'll tell you what my nutricionist told me (AND SHE HAD CELIACS TOO) She told me that a hot dishwasher will be enough for plates, utensils, pans. But...if your pans have cracks in them to get new ones. She told me to get new muffin tins (because you know you never get those totally clean) or to use paper liners. We also were told to get a new toaster for the gluten-free bread which we did.

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I'm back to say that I forgot to mention toasters. You can't share a toaster. You just can't clean all the crumbs out. You can't. The good news is that it doesn't cost a fortune to buy a toaster.

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Don't forget the can openers! Depending on the brand, electric ones especially can harbour all sorts of icky things, sometimes potentially gluten that can get into whatever is being opened. Unless, of course, everyone but me has perfectly clean kitchens and appliances at all times! :P

Like many others, I replaced things with scratched surfaces (i.e. plastic containers) but not my pots and pans. They are incredibly expensive so I cleaned them like mad. Got a couple of new cutting boards. Oh, and a new strainer and fine mesh sieves.

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Thanks so much! I went out and bought a gluten-free toaster and all new plastic and wood stuff, and I've bought new cutting boards. We also designated a couple of scratched pots and pans as gluten only. This has been really helpful!!

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What about ceramic pots & pans? I live with a non-celiac relative, and we've been switching our pots and pans to ceramic because it's just healthier for you when it comes to cancer-risk. Do I have to worry about these types of pans when it comes to gluten residue? I think some of them are scratched...that may answer my question :(

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Hi Roxy,

Ceramic should be fine, as long as it is cleaned well.

Welcome to the forum! :) 

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Well, I have no advice to give. I am sitting here crying. I am sick, I'm hungry, l'm afraid to eat or cook. I need the Doctor to find another diagnoses. I can't afford this one. I am so overwhelmed, not sure how to deal with this or even where to begin.....

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5 hours ago, msdot said:

Well, I have no advice to give. I am sitting here crying. I am sick, I'm hungry, l'm afraid to eat or cook. I need the Doctor to find another diagnoses. I can't afford this one. I am so overwhelmed, not sure how to deal with this or even where to begin.....

Welcome to the board. This condition can be a bit overwhelming at first but we are here to help you get through it. It is best to stick with whole foods at first. Veggies, frozen without sauce is fine, fresh meats, chicken, fish, fruits etc. are going to be safe. You don't need all new pots and pans or dishes and silverware. Just wash them well. If you have wooden utensils or scratched pans replace them along with your colander and toaster. 

Do you live with others who eat gluten? If so give them or yourself a dedicated space to prepare food. Just think of gluten foods as raw chicken and clean those as throughly as you would if you cut that raw chicken on them.

It is a good idea at first to drop dairy products as those are the most common for us to have issues with when we have celiac. Dairy can usually be added back in when you have healed a bit. Just start with things like hard cheeses and yogurt.

Healing can have it's ups and downs for a bit so don't get discouraged. Also realize that we have some folks here that have other issues and have to restrict their diets even more than someone with just celiac.  Don't let that scare you. Just worry about being gluten free for now. If you need help with recipes or info on anything related to this life change let us know. We have a lot of knowledgeable folks here that will do their best to help.

Hang in there. Things will get better and you are in the right place to get the help you need to make the transition as smooth as possible.

 

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10 hours ago, msdot said:

Well, I have no advice to give. I am sitting here crying. I am sick, I'm hungry, l'm afraid to eat or cook. I need the Doctor to find another diagnoses. I can't afford this one. I am so overwhelmed, not sure how to deal with this or even where to begin.....

Couple of cheap tricks to slowly convert over, as mentioned you have to get new wooden utensils, new cutting board, colander, toaster, and toss any scratched pots/pans. BUT few things, 1. Crock Pot liners can make cooking large simple whole foods stews, soups easy without worry of CC, just mind that lid might be CCed. 2 Microwave cookware, Nordicware makes microwave omelette makers, rice cookers, grill plates with covers for splatters, steamers, etc. Cheap compared to new cookware and a life saver for making quick and easy foods for yourself in a hurry.
Look at whole foods often, veggies, meats, fruits etc. you can often do foil bags of these mixed up and seasoned, bake and done without worry for CC as your doing it in a foil bag, very simple recipes there.

Read the newbie 101 section, I also quarterly post a food list for alternatives you can use to knock out cravings safely or know stuff to look out for. IF You have any questions start a new thread, the community here is very helpful and supportive with various insights on different aspects and approaches to this disease.
https://www.celiac.com/forums/topic/91878-newbie-info-101/
https://www.celiac.com/forums/topic/122733-gluten-free-food-alternative-list-2018-q4/

 

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Thanks for the replys. I have 15 kids and Grandkids coming for Thanksgiving. I have pies, noodles, yeast rolls, dressing, and ect to make for Thursday. I have not told them about my results, I just found out Friday. Bad timing! It is just breaking my heart to know I won't be able to ever do this again. Cooking for my family is what this Mom does.

I have been seeking answers for 30 years. I have been to that many different doctors too. They order all the tests, they are all normal, and then they conclude it is anxiety, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, ect.

I am going to proceed with Thanksgiving as usual. Then begin by cleaning out the kitchen. I will be back then to read everyone's  advice. I will get through this emotional period. I just feel like I am betraying my family or cutting ties.

I am probably putting this in the wrong subject. Sorry, I have never typed anything on a public place before. I am a very private person and publicly airing my problems is NOT what I do! Yet here I am doing exactly that.....

P.S. What does CC mean?

 

 

 

Edited by msdot
Adding a comment.

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30 minutes ago, msdot said:

Thanks for the replys. I have 15 kids and Grandkids coming for Thanksgiving. I have pies, noodles, yeast rolls, dressing, and ect to make for Thursday. I have not told them about my results, I just found out Friday. Bad timing! It is just breaking my heart to know I won't be able to ever do this again. Cooking for my family is what this Mom does.

I have been seeking answers for 30 years. I have been to that many different doctors too. They order all the tests, they are all normal, and then they conclude it is anxiety, chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, ect.

I am going to proceed with Thanksgiving as usual. Then begin by cleaning out the kitchen. I will be back then to read everyone's  advice. I will get through this emotional period. I just feel like I am betraying my family or cutting ties.

I am probably putting this in the wrong subject. Sorry, I have never typed anything on a public place before. I am a very private person and publicly airing my problems is NOT what I do! Yet here I am doing exactly that.....

P.S. What does CC mean?

 

 

 

 Cross Contamination, when something touches something with gluten then touches your gluten free feed, IE you use the same knife, cutting board, or a scratched pan....it transfers tiny amounts of gluten to your "safe" food and makes you sick.


I do thanksgiving all gluten free....I also have to do it corn free, so it can be done.
They make gluten-free rolls, and even a Hawaiian sweet roll gluten-free version I found at whole foods a few months back, Dressing is easy to make gluten-free, many cornbreads are gluten-free you just admit the white bread from it, and add few tsp of a starch to give it that texture and use SAFE cream of soups not the campells stuff(Hey I have to do this corn free,,,imagine my challenge I DID OVER COME with my own recipes)
Pies...I have 2 different pie crust recipes here on my blog for grain free pie crust....just fill with your standard pecan, apple, etc pie filling and BAM done. Noodles, I use no carb miracle noodles or palmini noodles, but they make more "noodle" like versions from rice flour etc, again check that link I gave with gluten-free alternatives.

Do you last gluten thanksgiving here, and look at how to make it gluten-free next year...hay you have a WHOLE year to test recipes lol.

Be thankful it is just Celiac, check my signature at the bottom of the post for my other issues....that is my collateral damage from this disease. IT just made me a better cook and I work with what I have left. Good luck and enjoy the holidays. 

 

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Welcome!  

You can still cook Thanksgiving meals for your family!  I do.  And my gluten free family members and friends love it.  

I agree, just prepare your meal as usual for this year.  Next year, consider making most of your dishes or all of them for the family.  Bread is your toughest challenge, but it can be done well enough to please gluten eaters.  Or simply have them bring a few dishes (e.g. rolls). 

I used to bake everything from scratch for years.  Even my bread.  When I was diagnosed, I converted my recipes.  It took a little time and experimentation.  My kid would rather have home made gluten free birthday cake over any bakery bought cake.  

Years ago, I hosted a BBQ.  Burgers without buns.  I had all the fixings and wonder iceberg lettuce to wrap them.  I heard family complaining.  I ignored it.  As they were eating, they said it was one of the best burgers they ever had.  After that, no one ever complained!  

This is a lot to take in.  But you will master the diet and make adjustments.  The best part is feeling better.  

The nice thing about this forum is that you can be anonymous.  You can vent.  You can get help.  It is so nice to hang with people who get it!  I do not belong to a celiac group Facebook page for this very reason.  

Be sure to suggest that other family members get tested even if asymptomatic.  You are probably not the only one with celiac disease.  

Oh, Tuesday I am baking pumpkin cream cheese rolls (Libby recipe) and brioche (yeast) rolls.  Gluten free items are best consumed quickly or frozen (which is what I will do).  I am not baking alone.  My daughter’s friend (teen) was diagnosed with celiac disease this year.  I am teaching her to bake and to insure she has some goodies to take to her Grandparent’s house.  

 

Edited by cyclinglady

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