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erikamarie87

Are There Any Blood Tests If I'm Already gluten-free?

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Hi I'm new to this forum and would appreciate any advice. I've been Gluten Free for 3 years but REALLY want testing done to see if I'm Celiac or just Gluten Intolerant. I know for sure I have to eat Gluten free as I get EXTREMELY sick when I eat it. I've never been able to get tested because I've heard you have to be consuming Gluten for at least 2 weeks for the tests to be accurate. My problem is I throw it up when I consume any amount and get all the other symptoms that go along with it! I would like to know if my genes are prone to Celiac to know if I need to watch for any other autoimmune diseases? It would also be nice to know since I have an identical twin sister who has all the symptoms as well. My other question is what tests can my doc perform to see if I have a malabsorption problem? If anybody can tell me ANY tests I can get done to check my vitamin and mineral deficiencies because I KNOW I'm deficient in something! I'm currently on disability for my illnesses. I'm desperately seeking any help!!! :( My main concern is I'm SOOO Fatigued I'm on 80mg of extended release Adderral a day just to stay awake and I'm to the point where that doesn't even work anymore. I'm only 24!! I'm at a loss on what to do! My doctors seem to not take me serious what so ever and I'm suffering depression and Bipolar as well as Extreme Anxiety with a lot of other problems! I feel helpless and just want answers! :( I also think I have Many more food intolerance's but don't know exactly how to go about figuring those out either....I would love any feed back as I feel my body is shutting down....

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Hi there.

Have they given your thyroid a good going-over? That can contribute greatly to fatigue, depression, and anxiety.

The only panic attacks I ever had in my life were when my thyroid was crashing.

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You can't be tested for celiac without eating a fair amount of gluten, which doesn't sound like a good idea. Two weeks is not even long enough. Chicago Celiac Center tells people to challenge for three months, other clinics say two. The genetic tests are not terribly useful as far as telling apart celiac vs. gluten intolerance since you can be gluten intolerant with DQ2 and celiac without the so-called celiac genes.

As Beachbirdie says, you need thyroid testing. Probably also iron, B12, vitamin D, and a lot of naturopaths are starting to look at zinc deficiency as a problem for some people. You probably also need to be tested for lyme disease, mono, and other common causes of chronic fatigue.

You might consider an elimination diet for a couple weeks. Lamb (or turkey if you can't afford lamb and don't eat turkey often), rice, and pears is a pretty classic allergy elimination. If you feel better eating only a few foods that don't tend to cause people problems you know there is a food intolerance involved.

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Hi there.

Have they given your thyroid a good going-over? That can contribute greatly to fatigue, depression, and anxiety.

The only panic attacks I ever had in my life were when my thyroid was crashing.

Thanks for your response. :) I'm not quite sure what you mean by giving my thyroid a good going over? I have my test results in front of me and it says my TSH results that I had done in January is 0.88 mIU/L and I'm assuming the other number 0.34-5.60 is the normal range. I'm not sure what this exactly means as the docs say my thyroid is fine. Are there more tests I should ask for? All your help is very much appreciated! :)

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Have you checked to make sure all the meds you are on are gluten free? Many times the script bottle will have the maker on it and a quick search using their name and the words contact info should get you a phone number.

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You can't be tested for celiac without eating a fair amount of gluten, which doesn't sound like a good idea. Two weeks is not even long enough. Chicago Celiac Center tells people to challenge for three months, other clinics say two. The genetic tests are not terribly useful as far as telling apart celiac vs. gluten intolerance since you can be gluten intolerant with DQ2 and celiac without the so-called celiac genes.

As Beachbirdie says, you need thyroid testing. Probably also iron, B12, vitamin D, and a lot of naturopaths are starting to look at zinc deficiency as a problem for some people. You probably also need to be tested for lyme disease, mono, and other common causes of chronic fatigue.

You might consider an elimination diet for a couple weeks. Lamb (or turkey if you can't afford lamb and don't eat turkey often), rice, and pears is a pretty classic allergy elimination. If you feel better eating only a few foods that don't tend to cause people problems you know there is a food intolerance involved.

Thank you Skylark for your response again I can use any advice. :) I've been reading a lot of your posts on here and am intrigued by your knowledge! :) I just had blood work done again and the docs say everything looks normal...my question is, what's normal?? Does it vary from person to person? What if my normal is different than what the docs say is the "normal range"?? Is this possible? My chiropractor gave me a Health Appraisal Questionnaire from Metagenics called MET423. Are you familiar with this company at all? My results were off the charts! It says I'm in the "High Priority" in almost every category of the body...My point is the doctors all say I'm in perfect health by all my lab work but I KNOW there's something going on with my body I just don't know exactly where to start to figure it out??...

I have done a lot of researching about elimination diets...I just don't know which one to go by! How do you pick one? I'm leaning towards the SCD diet at the moment...although I am concerned with basically everything I eat..My biggest thing is I TRULY believe I have Leaky Gut and Systemic Candidiasis....

Do you have any suggestions on helping with either one of these conditions?

Also, I'm looking into EnteroLab testing. The only thing is the cost. I'm currently on Medicare and State Medical Assistance for insurance so I'm sure I wouldn't get reimbursed. I would LOVE to be tested for all other food intolerance's! What's your personal opinion with EnteroLab? I see a lot of people on here have been tested through them and curious to whether that would help me or not?...

Again your feedback is MUCH appreciated!! :) I'm Tired of being soooo Tired!!! :(

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I'm in your shoes. Feel awful, all tests normal. They don't test enough and you're absolutely right that your "normal" might not be "normal". If you're sure you have leaky gut and candidiasis, SCD or even GAPS (http://www.gapsdiet.com) is probably a good first thing to try. Pay attention to how you feel after the sauerkraut or yogurt - it might help but fermented foods give me trouble because they are high in amines.

I wouldn't bother with ANY intolerance testing, especially if money is an issue. You will not get reimbursed for Enterolab becasue it's not a valid diagnostic test. All intolerance testing is very prone to false positives. As I said earlier, elimination is much more reliable than the testing and it's free.

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You can't be tested for celiac without eating a fair amount of gluten, which doesn't sound like a good idea. Two weeks is not even long enough. Chicago Celiac Center tells people to challenge for three months, other clinics say two.

I absolutely agree that consuming any amount of gluten is not a good idea for erikamarie.

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Thanks for your response. :) I'm not quite sure what you mean by giving my thyroid a good going over? I have my test results in front of me and it says my TSH results that I had done in January is 0.88 mIU/L and I'm assuming the other number 0.34-5.60 is the normal range. I'm not sure what this exactly means as the docs say my thyroid is fine. Are there more tests I should ask for? All your help is very much appreciated! :)

My TSH was in range also. My doctor prescribed Armour eventually anyway. It really helps. She told me to take it every 4 hours, and if I'm late, I absolutely crash.

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I KNOW there's something going on with my body I just don't know exactly where to start to figure it out??...

I have done a lot of researching about elimination diets...I just don't know which one to go by! How do you pick one? I'm leaning towards the SCD diet at the moment...although I am concerned with basically everything I eat..My biggest thing is I TRULY believe I have Leaky Gut and Systemic Candidiasis....

Do you have any suggestions on helping with either one of these conditions?

Also, I'm looking into EnteroLab testing. The only thing is the cost. I'm currently on Medicare and State Medical Assistance for insurance so I'm sure I wouldn't get reimbursed. I would LOVE to be tested for all other food intolerance's! What's your personal opinion with EnteroLab? I see a lot of people on here have been tested through them and curious to whether that would help me or not?...

Again your feedback is MUCH appreciated!! :) I'm Tired of being soooo Tired!!! :(

I can really relate to being sick and tired of being sick and tired. A former coworker even wrote, sang and recorded a song about that for me. You are on the right track with all of this: the leaky gut, the candidiasis, the scd, the tests you want. I knew I had the leaky gut and candidiasis before I heard of gluten. Listen to your body.

I spent thousands of dollars on tests, out of my own pocket, and they all helped, especially the really expensive food intolerance one. It is hard to find one with as many intolerances as me. Generally, the older you are at celiac diagnosis, the more food intolerances you are likely to develop from leaky gut, but I know one woman who is much younger than I who had more. Most of my food intolerances cause myalgia for 5 days or more, starting within 2 to 12 hours after eating them. These run the gamut of foods, but are every category of related food allergies I've heard of, like nightshades, and I've recently understood that I can't handle any cruciferous vegetables. I had to eliminate all herbs except oregano.

Obviously you can't afford all these tests, and they won't be covered. I have heard that 66% of celiacs are self-diagnosed. It's no wonder, with how sick we get and how unhelpful most doctors and health insurance is.

I was very happy with my enterolab testing, which I did a month after going gluten-free, including stool for antibodies to gliadin and tTG, fecal fat content, casein intolerance, and gene test. My doctor, an MD with more than 20 years of experience with gluten issues, diagnosed me based on the results. But I had my doubts after a couple of months of being gluten-free, until I got glutened in a restaurant, and got sicker than ever. Like Dr. Fine says, that is the best test.

I just had a positive blood panel, 4.5 years after diagnosis. I only eat meals I prepare from scratch from whole foods, and a few (right around 3 that I stick to) prepared foods, don't go into restaurants, and eat small samples of food prepared by a very experienced and knowledgable celiac chef every few months at a support group cooking class. But I was gluten symptomatic when I had the blood drawn. My doctor told me about a case where a patient of hers had a negative blood test, then had a positive one after being gluten-free for a year. The so called truths about testing for celiac are not true for everyone. It's very political. There are labs and researchers who know that celiacs have a different, altered metabolism, and there are metabolic markers, even after being gluten-free for years.

Erikamarie, do you think you have the gluten successfully eliminated? How long has it been since you think you got contamination? Do you live with gluten consumers?

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An elimination diet is pretty simple really. You don't need to read a lot of theories about it or prescribed foods to eat etc. Just pick out 5 foods that you don't think will bother you and eat only those foods. After 2 weeks if you feel better then you are most likely ok with those foods. So pick out one additional food to add to your diet, again something that you don't think you will react too. It your same diet with plenty of that new food for 3 days. If you get sick then that new food is probably the reason. So eliminate it and try again.

Everything counts though, coffee, tea, sodas, spices, vitamin pills, meds, etc. Anything you consume is a potential problem, not just food.

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I have heard that 66% of celiacs are self-diagnosed.

Joe, This is a very specific statistic....where is this documented?

thanks!

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The so called truths about testing for celiac are not true for everyone. It's very political. There are labs and researchers who know that celiacs have a different, altered metabolism, and there are metabolic markers, even after being gluten-free for years.

Nonsense! :blink:

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It's very political. There are labs and researchers who know that celiacs have a different, altered metabolism, and there are metabolic markers, even after being gluten-free for years.

Again, is this statement based on ANY scientific data?

WHICH labs and researchers "know this"??

You keep posting statements as if they are "facts" and using random statistics and do not provide anything solid in support.

In the Blood Transfusion thread, too.

May I remind you of Board rule #5.

"Any claims you make here should be based on legitimate sources, or be expressed as opinion, experience, or inquiry."

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I spent thousands of dollars on tests, out of my own pocket, and they all helped, especially the really expensive food intolerance one. It is hard to find one with as many intolerances as me. Generally, the older you are at celiac diagnosis, the more food intolerances you are likely to develop from leaky gut, but I know one woman who is much younger than I who had more.

again....?? I also had IgG testing done by an "integrative doctor" and paid out of pocket, but the reality is...we may have been "had". Mine said I had no "gluten antibodies", but I was a raging celiac. Sick to death.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10024224?dopt=Abstract

http://www.tldp.com/issue/174/IgG%20Food%20Allergy.html

http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/index.php/igg-food-intolerance-tests-what-does-the-science-say/

This does not mean that some Celiacs will not develop secondary intolerances (lactose or egg, for example) as a result of blunted villi. I did myself.

Here is a recent article that busts these claims:

"Claim: The IgG blood test is 95 percent reliable.

Reality: The test is prone to false positives and not considered reliable by any U.S. or European allergy or immunology society."

This is found in the following article....

Be wary of food intolerance tests — they may not live up to their claims

Published: April 19. 2012 4:00AM PST

If you’re considering taking a food intolerance test, it’s best to read the company’s marketing materials with a critical eye.

A quick scan of websites selling food intolerance tests revealed some inaccurate statements.

Here are some of the most common:

Claim: Food intolerances are caused by eating a repetitive diet; this overloads the immune system and the body responds by rejecting those foods.

Reality: “The gut-associated immune system is well-equipped to deal with loads of antigenic material, and there is just no evidence that it may become overloaded by exposure to large amounts of the same antigen,” said Stefano Guandalini, founder and medical director of the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center.

Claim: The number of Americans with food allergies may have risen to a whopping 60 to 75 percent.

Reality: Food allergies, which are different from food intolerance, affect 5 percent of U.S. children younger than age 5 and 4 percent of older children and adults, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

As many as 1 in 3 people think they have a food allergy, but only about 1 in 28 have a food allergy that has been confirmed by a health care official, the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases says.

Claim: Most insurance covers food intolerance testing.

Reality: Not true.

Claim: Hair sampling is a safe and noninvasive method of revealing nutritional deficiencies.

Reality: Hair is made up of a protein, keratin, that can be analyzed to determine its mineral content.

That data can be used to find out if the body is lacking in certain minerals, but it can’t tell you whether you have food intolerances, allergist Lee Freund wrote in “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Food Allergies.”

Double-blind studies haven’t shown any diagnostic value for this test.

— Chicago Tribune

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I've had 2 things that made me tired since starting a gluten-free diet, and staying away from those things along with staying gluten-free has otherwise helped my energy levels a lot. The first thing was maltodextrin in a supplement, the supplement wasn't labeled gluten-free and I think the 'rule' about that ingredient being gluten-free doesn't necessarily apply for supplements? (At least in the U.S.) I'm not positive about that, but I now avoid it.

The other thing I tried recently that made me really tired was Udi's bagels. I'm not sure what it was, but it happened on 2 different occasions. I have a couple more bagels in the freezer that I might try again some day, but not in the near future. I've tried Against the Grain rolls, and was fine with those. I'm also fine with with Ener-G bread, as well as Rudi's cinnamon raisin bread.

The elimination diet mentioned earlier might be a good idea, or just keeping a food diary (or both!).

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. The first thing was maltodextrin in a supplement, the supplement wasn't labeled gluten-free and I think the 'rule' about that ingredient being gluten-free doesn't necessarily apply for supplements? (At least in the U.S.) I'm not positive about that, but I now avoid it.

Maltodextrin is safe.

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I've had 2 things that made me tired since starting a gluten-free diet, and staying away from those things along with staying gluten-free has otherwise helped my energy levels a lot. The first thing was maltodextrin in a supplement, the supplement wasn't labeled gluten-free and I think the 'rule' about that ingredient being gluten-free doesn't necessarily apply for supplements? (At least in the U.S.) I'm not positive about that, but I now avoid it.

In the US, FALCPA does apply to supplements. The only things exempt are prescription meds, liquor, and USDA-regulated foods like meat and eggs. USDA has a separate set of laws that require grain fillers to be declared so wheat is still labeled in meat and poultry.

Maltodextrin is almost always made from corn in the US and wheat maltodextrin would be labeled with a wheat allergen warning.

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My chiropractor gave me a Health Appraisal Questionnaire from Metagenics called MET423. Are you familiar with this company at all? My results were off the charts! It says I'm in the "High Priority" in almost every category of the body...

My biggest thing is I TRULY believe I have Leaky Gut and Systemic Candidiasis....

I'm currently on Medicare and State Medical Assistance for insurance so I'm sure I wouldn't get reimbursed. I would LOVE to be tested for all other food intolerance's!

Hon, a chiropractor is not medically trained to help you with your health problems. He gave you the Metagenics questionnaire so he could sell you some supplements. I saw this same thing from a massage therapist who was going to cure my gut. (she didn't)

Systemic yeast is a life-threatening condition that would have you in the hospital because your organs would be overgrown with an invasive yeast. This is not likely to be your problem.

People tout "systemic yeast" cures that do not help.

If you are worried about yeast, have stool testing done.

If you have visible yeast in your mouth or genital area, see a doctor and get a prescription for anti-fungals. If not, you are not dealing with a yeast overgrowth.

Take probiotics every day, especially if you take BC pills, estrogen or steroids or antibiotics. They will balance your gut flora. This may well be causing your fatigue.

of "systemic yeast", Dr. Weil states:

"This is a self-diagnosis based on the scientifically unfounded notion that Candida albicans, a species of yeast that normally lives harmlessly in the gastrointestinal tract and vagina, can routinely become a serious systemic infection responsible for a host of ailments. Systemic candidiasis is said to cause fatigue, depression, anxiety, skin eruptions, and immune system malfunction.

In fact, Candida albicans, sometimes can get out of control, causing vaginal infections, intestinal upsets, or infections of the mouth and throat (called thrush). In most cases, this is the result of prolonged or frequent use of antibiotics, which can wipe out the "friendly" bacteria that normally keep yeast in check. Other drugs that can wipe out intestinal flora or encourage overgrowth of yeast are steroids and estrogen, either in the form of birth control pills or hormone replacement therapy.

A book called "The Yeast Connection" by Dr. William Crook popularized the hypothesis that Candida is a major pathogen that can weaken the immune system, allowing other infections to occur. Dr. Crook also contends that toxins produced by Candida could contribute to the development of multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune disorders.

There is little hard evidence for these ideas.

Diagnoses of systemic candidiasis usually have no scientific basis, and most of the recommended treatments for it waste time and money. Anyone with yeast growing in the blood or vital organs would be critically ill in an intensive care unit.

Despite this medical reality, systemic candidiasis remains a popular diagnosis in some segments of the alternative medicine community. My belief is that its persistence is an example of our fears of foreign invaders; it satisfies a need to blame our maladies on an external cause.

Most of the treatments used for this "disease" are harmless except for drugs like ketoconazole (Nizoral) and fluconazole (Diflucan) which can be toxic to the liver and should not be used except on the advice of an infectious disease specialist. A study reported a few years ago in the New England Journal of Medicine found that the more commonly used drug nystatin (Mycostatin) was no more effective than a placebo in treating people who thought they had systemic candidiasis.

My colleague and naturopathic physician, Judy Hutt, NMD, points out that although systemic candidiasis is an unfounded diagnosis, one should not ignore chronic gas and bloating and other refractory gastrointestinal complaints that develop after taking large doses of antibiotics or steroids. In addition to oral or topical antifungal treatments, other natural therapeutic options include taking a good acidophilus product (such as Lactobacillus GG) to help restore normal gut flora, cutting back on refined sugars, avoiding dairy products, and eating one clove of garlic per day, preferably raw."

Lactobacillus GG is found in the OTC probiotic, Culturelle.

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In the US, FALCPA does apply to supplements. The only things exempt are prescription meds, liquor, and USDA-regulated foods like meat and eggs. USDA has a separate set of laws that require grain fillers to be declared so wheat is still labeled in meat and poultry.

Maltodextrin is almost always made from corn in the US and wheat maltodextrin would be labeled with a wheat allergen warning.

Thanks for the in-depth clarification!

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My TSH was in range also. My doctor prescribed Armour eventually anyway. It really helps. She told me to take it every 4 hours, and if I'm late, I absolutely crash.

Wow thanks for the info! :) I will definitely bring it up to my doctor!

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I can really relate to being sick and tired of being sick and tired. A former coworker even wrote, sang and recorded a song about that for me. You are on the right track with all of this: the leaky gut, the candidiasis, the scd, the tests you want. I knew I had the leaky gut and candidiasis before I heard of gluten. Listen to your body.

I spent thousands of dollars on tests, out of my own pocket, and they all helped, especially the really expensive food intolerance one. It is hard to find one with as many intolerances as me. Generally, the older you are at celiac diagnosis, the more food intolerances you are likely to develop from leaky gut, but I know one woman who is much younger than I who had more. Most of my food intolerances cause myalgia for 5 days or more, starting within 2 to 12 hours after eating them. These run the gamut of foods, but are every category of related food allergies I've heard of, like nightshades, and I've recently understood that I can't handle any cruciferous vegetables. I had to eliminate all herbs except oregano.

Obviously you can't afford all these tests, and they won't be covered. I have heard that 66% of celiacs are self-diagnosed. It's no wonder, with how sick we get and how unhelpful most doctors and health insurance is.

I was very happy with my enterolab testing, which I did a month after going gluten-free, including stool for antibodies to gliadin and tTG, fecal fat content, casein intolerance, and gene test. My doctor, an MD with more than 20 years of experience with gluten issues, diagnosed me based on the results. But I had my doubts after a couple of months of being gluten-free, until I got glutened in a restaurant, and got sicker than ever. Like Dr. Fine says, that is the best test.

I just had a positive blood panel, 4.5 years after diagnosis. I only eat meals I prepare from scratch from whole foods, and a few (right around 3 that I stick to) prepared foods, don't go into restaurants, and eat small samples of food prepared by a very experienced and knowledgable celiac chef every few months at a support group cooking class. But I was gluten symptomatic when I had the blood drawn. My doctor told me about a case where a patient of hers had a negative blood test, then had a positive one after being gluten-free for a year. The so called truths about testing for celiac are not true for everyone. It's very political. There are labs and researchers who know that celiacs have a different, altered metabolism, and there are metabolic markers, even after being gluten-free for years.

Erikamarie, do you think you have the gluten successfully eliminated? How long has it been since you think you got contamination? Do you live with gluten consumers?

Yes I'm the only one in my household gluten-free...It's hard to say when the last time I was glutened as I literally feel sick ALL the time!! I'm Seriously researching the SCD Diet to eliminate most foods so I can heal my gut and Then try and figure out what's causing me to be sooo sick...

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In the US, FALCPA does apply to supplements. The only things exempt are prescription meds, liquor, and USDA-regulated foods like meat and eggs. USDA has a separate set of laws that require grain fillers to be declared so wheat is still labeled in meat and poultry.

Maltodextrin is almost always made from corn in the US and wheat maltodextrin would be labeled with a wheat allergen warning.

I didn't realize it was made from corn..I'm glad you mentioned that because I have been researching corn intolerance and feel it is highly possible I'm intolerant to it. I say this because 2 days ago I at went out to eat to a mexican restaurant and ordered chicken, shrimp and steak fajitas and specified no wheat in seasoning so the waiter actually brought me out the seasoning they cooked with and it specified no msg as well as no wheat and I also ordered corn tortillas. Well when I got home and ate my left overs after a few hours I felt for the most part fine didn't think anything of it...well when I woke up my left eye was completely puffy and swolen underneath and my right eyelid was almost closed shut from being so swolen as well as both eyelids were beat red, dry and flaky and they itched sooo bad! I also was congested through my sinuses...today my eyes are still red, dry and flaky and still itch like Crazy and were a little swollen and again this morning I was congested when I woke up. I've NEVER had a reaction like this before to anything I've eaten! I'm thinking it's corn for the meir fact I ate 5 corn tortillas in 1 day, oh as well as popcorn that evening...tell me if this sounds right?..I don't know what else I would be reacting to like this?

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Yes I'm the only one in my household gluten-free...It's hard to say when the last time I was glutened as I literally feel sick ALL the time!! I'm Seriously researching the SCD Diet to eliminate most foods so I can heal my gut and Then try and figure out what's causing me to be sooo sick...

This may well be the problem. If you are sick ALL the time, it is possible that it is constant cross-contamination. You are probably being careful, but it is difficult for others to understand how easily we can be CCed.

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You can't be tested for celiac without eating a fair amount of gluten, which doesn't sound like a good idea. Two weeks is not even long enough. Chicago Celiac Center tells people to challenge for three months, other clinics say two. The genetic tests are not terribly useful as far as telling apart celiac vs. gluten intolerance since you can be gluten intolerant with DQ2 and celiac without the so-called celiac genes.

As Beachbirdie says, you need thyroid testing. Probably also iron, B12, vitamin D, and a lot of naturopaths are starting to look at zinc deficiency as a problem for some people. You probably also need to be tested for lyme disease, mono, and other common causes of chronic fatigue.

You might consider an elimination diet for a couple weeks. Lamb (or turkey if you can't afford lamb and don't eat turkey often), rice, and pears is a pretty classic allergy elimination. If you feel better eating only a few foods that don't tend to cause people problems you know there is a food intolerance involved.

Skylark, quick question by eating Lamb (or turkey), rice, and pears how is this a classic allergy eliminator? Would you suggest eating just these 3 things for some time???...I guess I'm a little confused?..Thanks again for your help :)

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    Remove soft tortilla to a paper towel and repeat with remaining tortillas.
    Pour enough enchilada sauce to coat the bottom of a large casserole pan.
    Dunk a tortilla into the sauce and cover both sides. Add more sauce as needed.
    Fill each tortilla with bits of chicken, cauliflower, onion, and queso fresco, and roll into shape.
    When pan is full of rolled enchiladas, top with remaining sauce.
    Cook at 350F until sauce bubbles.
    Remove and top with fresh cotija cheese and scallions.
    Serve with rice, beans, and cabbage, and garnish with avocado, cilantro, and sliced grape tomatoes.

     

    Roxanne Bracknell
    Celiac.com 06/22/2018 - The rise of food allergies means that many people are avoiding gluten in recent times. In fact, the number of Americans who have stopped eating gluten has tripled in eight years between 2009 and 2017.
    Whatever your rationale for avoiding gluten, whether its celiac disease, a sensitivity to the protein, or any other reason, it can be really hard to find suitable places to eat out. When you’re on holiday in a new and unknown environment, this can be near impossible. As awareness of celiac disease grows around the world, however, more and more cities are opening their doors to gluten-free lifestyles, none more so than the 10 locations on the list below.
    Perhaps unsurprisingly, the U.S is a hotbed of gluten-free options, with four cities making the top 10, as well as the Hawaiian island of Maui. Chicago, in particular, is a real haven of gluten-free fare, with 240 coeliac-safe eateries throughout this huge city. The super hip city of Portland also ranks highly on this list, with the capital of counterculture rich in gluten-free cuisine, with San Francisco and Denver also included. Outside of the states, several prominent European capitals also rank very highly on the list, including Prague, the picturesque and historic capital of the Czech Republic, which boasts the best-reviewed restaurants on this list.
    The Irish capital of Dublin, meanwhile, has the most gluten-free establishments, with a huge 330 to choose from, while Amsterdam and Barcelona also feature prominently thanks to their variety of top-notch gluten-free fodder.
    Finally, a special mention must go to Auckland, the sole representative of Australasia in this list, with the largest city in New Zealand rounding out the top 10 thanks to its 180 coeliacsafe eateries.
    The full top ten gluten-free cities are shown in the graphic below:
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

    Advertising Banner-Ads
    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au

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    • While not the best (less specific), AGA antibodies still have some value.  For the most part, most labs are now just running the newer DGP tests in the U.S. Some posters reside in countries that may not have the most current tests.  I assume the DGP was run, but I could be wrong.  Maybe the OP can clarify. Here is a study to back my claim: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5553580/
    • IgA 678 Tissue Transglutaminase IgA 2 units Tissue Transglutaminase IgG 3 units Giliadin IgG 24 units Giliadin IgA 62 Units but Endomysial Ab negative?
    • It looks like you were tested with the old anti-gliadin antibodies, which unfortunately are not good tests for Celiac Disease.  These old tests show that at some point gliadin has gotten into your system and an antibody has formed against it.  It may be a sign that you had "leaky gut".  These kinds of antibodies can come and go and overall are not very helpful in establishing a diagnosis. But there are some other blood tests that still might be useful:  the tissue transglutaminase (tTG-IgA) and the newer gliadin test:  deamidated gliadin peptide antibodies (DGP IgA and DGP IgG).       Some doctors will proceed with a biopsy if you have symptoms and negative celiac blood tests, because even in Celiac Disease blood tests are negative about 10% of the time.  There are some screening checklists here:  http://www.glutenfreeindy.com/screening-checklists.html If you have all the right tests and they are negative, you could still have non-celiac gluten sensitivity or other types of food sensitivity.  At that point you could do an elimination diet to determine what is causing symptoms.
    • Wow!  I wish you the best on your upcoming Ironman.  I have done some sprints and relays, but never an Ironman.  Usually, I do Century Rides.  Like you, I am on a lower carb, high fat gluten-free diet.   Hey, I am looking at two Nunn containers right now in y kitchen.  One, citrus fruit does have corn, dextrose.  The other, Pomergranate Blueberry does not.  It simply has sugar (non-GMO sourced).  
    • Welcome!  At 235, your Immunoglobulin A is normal.  In the case of celiac disease, this test validates the other IgA celiac tests (it is a control test).  The positive gliadin IgA is elevated.  This means you should get referred to a Gastroenterologist for an endoscopy to obtain small intestinal biopsies.  You do not need all the celiac blood tests to be positive.  In fact, I just had only the elevated gliadin IGA and my biopsies revealed some moderate to severe patches of damaged villi.   Keep eating gluten until you see the Gastroenterologist.  In the meantime, keep researching celiac disease and ask questions!  
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