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Hain Sea Salt

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I went to the store today, because my household of 8 had what seemed to be 1 tsp of salt left. I looked at the salts in the natural foods. My usual brand was 4 times as expensive as Hain. In large letters I read Sea Salt. I went home with the Hain Salt.

For some reason after I got home I checked out the label. Yikes, there is an anticaking ingredient. I wonder what that could be? I called Hain. They could not disclose to me what the ingredient was derived from. When I mentioned I was sensitive to corn and wheat they explained that they make no guarantee that any of their products don't contain corn.

I don't know that anyone used gluten/or wheat as an anti-caking agent. However, if they won't disclose what it is derived from then how would I know?

I checked other salt containers I had at home. Each one labeled had a different caking agent to explore. Now I wonder if my regular salt has an agent. It was in the salt shaker and the label was gone. I used it. Very soon I will go to the store for salt. This time, I am going to be reading the label before I buy.

My "regular salt" is Real Salt and I am happy to say they use no caking agent. It is expensive though.

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I went to the store today, because my household of 8 had what seemed to be 1 tsp of salt left. I looked at the salts in the natural foods. My usual brand was 4 times as expensive as Hain. In large letters I read Sea Salt. I went home with the Hain Salt.

For some reason after I got home I checked out the label. Yikes, there is an anticaking ingredient. I wonder what that could be? I called Hain. They could not disclose to me what the ingredient was derived from. When I mentioned I was sensitive to corn and wheat they explained that they make no guarantee that any of their products don't contain corn.

I checked other salt containers I had at home. Each one labeled had a different caking agent to explore. Now I wonder if my regular salt has an agent. It was in the salt shaker and the label was gone. I used it. Very soon I will go to the store for salt. This time, I am going to be reading the label before I buy.

I am new with the corn abstinence thing. (I say that because it makes me look like I am pregnant like gluten). The only thing I trust is kosher salt. I tried Morton's brand salt without iodine and still seemed to react to it.I have no idea how safe the "anti-caking" agents are but I just try to avoid anything that I think shouldn't be in something

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I had to go check my salt after reading these posts. I have two kinds, both from Costco, and neither lists anything other than salt as an ingredient.

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I use Cerulean Seas Sea Salt. The only ingredient is refined sea salt.

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I use Real Salt. (It is a brand, it is mined from Utah.) It has no additives at all, and no anti-caking agents. Dig rocks, grind rocks, insert into package, ship. For anyone with concerns about iodine, here is a list of the trace minerals that Real Salt has. I eat it for two reasons, I love the taste! Which is honestly the primary reason and second, I am all for promoting local businesses and it isn't everywhere you can walk out and buy salt from a local business. There is no way I could ever go back to consuming the chemical stew that is shoved down our throats "for our own good" called table salt. Blech!

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So you got me to dig out my various salt containers, here's what I found:

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This is ALL news to me!

Thank you!

I just thought it was iodine that was the problem with salt, but that's only because I have DH. I never realized corn was in salt or anti-caking silicate. I'm not allergic or intolerant that I know of...but I would prefer my salt to be just salt. Thanks for the info! :)

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I have never encountered an anti-caking agent that had gluten. Where I am, cellulose is commonly used--derived from wood pulp.

Calcium silicate is gluten-free.

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What the bleeping ****.

I am going to have to forbid my spouse from buying staples by himself. I noticed the label is changed on our brand new package of Hain Sea Salt.

The front label is now the typical spin, "From a Natural Source."

Ingredients:

Sea Salt, calcium silicate, dextrose, potassium iodide, sodium bicarbonate.

The salt COULD contain an unsourced grain product from dextrose. Dextrose in the USA is made from corn starch, sometimes wheat starch is used in Europe. It would depend on where it was imported from. Either way, dextrose has no place in SALT.

Nothing aggravates me more than companies adding a potential grain source (and a lot of other crap ) :angry: to what was once a much simpler product, and not labeling accurately.

This product will NOT be further consumed in my house.

I am in the United States of No Real Consumer Standards.

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For those who use butter:

What is in the salt that goes in the butter? I just wondered as I was eating breakfast.

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What is in the salt that goes in the butter?

That is an interesting question. I would assume they use the cheapest possible salt they can get. Then again I buy unsalted so it doesn't really matter to me.

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It is mind boggling, when you think about it. Salt could have a list of 6 ingredients, but when salt is an ingredient in and of itself, we just get "salt".

I use a Himalayan Sea Salt/grinder - it just says "Himalayan Sea Salt".

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made me look :lol:

From the label

" Diamond crystal fine all natural sea salt 100% pure sea salt, this salt does not supply iodine , a necessary nutrient :blink:

This is an additive free salt caking may occur over time .Please shake container before using

Ingredients : sea salt "

I also use unsalted butter .

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Maybe I could get unsalted butter to use in my cooking, but have some salted to use for my family at the table. That could work.

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Maybe I could get unsalted butter to use in my cooking, but have some salted to use for my family at the table. That could work.

Try the unsalted butter at the table , I would bet your family will not notice the difference ;)

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What the bleeping ****.

I am going to have to forbid my spouse from buying staples by himself. I noticed the label is changed on our brand new package of Hain Sea Salt.

The front label is now the typical spin, "From a Natural Source."

Ingredients:

The salt COULD contain an unsourced grain product from dextrose. Dextrose in the USA is made from corn starch, sometimes wheat starch is used in Europe. It would depend on where it was imported from. Either way, dextrose has no place in SALT.

Nothing aggravates me more than companies adding a potential grain source (and a lot of other crap ) :angry: to what was once a much simpler product, and not labeling accurately.

This product will NOT be further consumed in my house.

I am in the United States of No Real Consumer Standards.

Dextrose is listed as a safe ingredient in most, if not all of the gluten free "safe" food listings. It is another one of those ingredients that Celiacs need not worry about but continues to worry some people. If it were derived from wheat, then I believe it would have to be labeled as such in the US. Dextrose (wheat).

Easy enough to figure out once you learn the ropes.....

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