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klin03

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Has anyone ever done this in the early months of being gluten free? I've been gluten free for several months and I have no desire to eat gluten just for the sake of eating gluten, but sometimes I think it would be good to know what to be on the lookout for in the case of an accidental glutening. I've had various symptoms of varying degrees of severity for most of my life but I always thought tummy aches and such were normal for everyone on Earth. They were/are certainly normal for me. It's only been in the past few years that I've realized it's not normal for the need to have a BM to be signaled by tummy aches. I'm still having a lot of those symptoms these days, but my TTG has improved greatly, so by the numbers, I'm on the right track. It wasn't until a couple of months before my diagnosis that things started getting abnormal by my standards, so I wonder if I should be expecting those symptoms (which I don't have a lot of experience with) when glutened? Or am I being glutened still, because I'm still experiencing my normal stuff? Or should I be eliminating other things? Or is it something else altogether? Morbid curiosity?

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Has anyone ever done this in the early months of being gluten free? I've been gluten free for several months and I have no desire to eat gluten just for the sake of eating gluten, but sometimes I think it would be good to know what to be on the lookout for in the case of an accidental glutening. I've had various symptoms of varying degrees of severity for most of my life but I always thought tummy aches and such were normal for everyone on Earth. They were/are certainly normal for me. It's only been in the past few years that I've realized it's not normal for the need to have a BM to be signaled by tummy aches. I'm still having a lot of those symptoms these days, but my TTG has improved greatly, so by the numbers, I'm on the right track. It wasn't until a couple of months before my diagnosis that things started getting abnormal by my standards, so I wonder if I should be expecting those symptoms (which I don't have a lot of experience with) when glutened? Or am I being glutened still, because I'm still experiencing my normal stuff? Or should I be eliminating other things? Or is it something else altogether? Morbid curiosity?

If you've only been diagnosed a few months ago, most likely your gut is still healing. Thats the case for me. I've been gluten free since May and I still get stomach problems from time to time. You could be getting glutened from somewhere - I'd start with your kitchen surfaces and cookware, but it could be anything from toothpaste to shampoo to skin products.

There have been times where I have been so frustrated not knowing if I've been glutened or am just healing that I've blurted out "why dont I just eat a piece of bread?" I'll never do it. First off, I wouldn't knowingly poison myself and risk derailing my progress. Also, if you do that, who knows if you'll be out of it for a day, a week, or a month? Its just not worth it for me - I have to work and function on a day to day basis and cant risk feeling like crap for weeks....I understand your frustration because I'm still sort of new at this too but I would encourage you to let your body heal more and see how you feel. Hope this helps!

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I wasn't sure what to say, but I guess I can tell you what it is like for me after consuming gluten accidentally. First, there is the GI symptoms that last for a few hours. Not so bad to be perfectly honest, but it is exhausting. Then, I'll really and truly be exhausted. I will sleep for more than half a day, usually more like 20 hours a day for about half a week maybe. When I can finally find the strength to keep myself upright in a chair for more than an hour at a time I'll still be so weak and tired (physically) that I can barely do anything for weeks afterward. I'll find myself going hungry because I can't find the energy to walk to the kitchen and actually make something and actually get a fork to my face afterward. There is nearly unbearable all over pain. Think like having the flu, only worse. I'll become so tender to touch that my husband loving resting his hand on my arm will be so painful I'll just start to cry. This symptom by itself is the reason I have a separate bed that I have to use for about 3-4 weeks if I've been glutened.

I promise, this is not the sort of thing you want to do to yourself on purpose. Not to know what it's like. Not to know if you are on the right track. I used to wonder that myself but as time wore on and I steadily improved a bit at a time I realized the small things I had been doing wrong but also all the things I had been doing right slowly added up. We've all done so much damage to ourselves for so long with gluten. We just need to have patience. I know it's hard. I assure you I am the queen of not having patience, but there is nothing to do in this case but simply wait. Put one foot in front of the other, get out of bed every morning with renewed purpose. Or with running feet and a full bladder... you know, whichever suits you. :P

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I know the uncertainty is frustrating, but you will eventually figure out glutening symptoms...the hard way. You will get "got".

People have a range of symptoms-from mild to extreme. And your symptoms can change, especially in the first year. Mine did. It may sound like a good idea, but if you end up with an ai attack that lasts a month you're going to think you are the stupidest person on the planet for doing that to yourself on purpose.

Glutening is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're gonna get.

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Everyone's symptoms are so all over the place and with so many of us having other intolerances it can be hard to tell. Regular grains give me fast GI symptoms. Gluten creeps up on me slow but them whammies me. Sometimes vomiting, sometimes not. I do not think it is worth it at all. One thing that is consistent is that I can feel my body being set back a good bit, i.e. undoing some healing.

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I have multiple intolerances and they all cause my psoriasis to flare. My digestive symptoms were very mild. But after over 14 months of being gluten-free, I did get glutened by some cross contaminated rice. Now I know what the rest of you who have severe digestive symptoms have gone through. I NEVER want to go through that again!

I live alone and don't eat at friend's houses or restaurants, so the chances of accidental glutening are all on my shoulders. I swear, if I ever decide to try a different food or a different brand, unless it is certified gluten-free, I will do without. I WILL read every label, EVERY time I buy a familiar brand. I'm never going to take a chance again!

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Like you, I thought it was normal to get a stomachache after most meals. I even had a doctor tell me "she's one of those people who gets stoamach aches after she eats" when I was about 8. :blink: I dismissed it and got tough so I wouldn't grimace or double over when in front of people; I always carried a sweater so I could hold it over my bloated belly to disguise it and push back.

The things we did, eh?

Anyways, I've been gluten-free for 3 months and glutened myself twice by mistake. For me, it felt the same as those stomachaches you used to get after eating; the ones before you went gluten-free. The belly ache hit about 20 minutes after eating and then turns into painful bloating which lasts a day, along with a migraine that lasted almost a week. It was super obvious! If you had GI issues after eating, I'm guessing that it would be pretty obvious for you too... whatever symptoms that have been relieved by going gluten-free, that's what you would get, and possibly slightly more severe.

I still get a few of the symptoms, but they are milder and much less frequent. As we heal, it will improve. :)

Best wishes.

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When I get glutened now, it is generally overwhelming nausea - the kind where you want to retch and have too much saliia and just can't think of anything else. :(

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Yes, as the others have said, eating gluten "just to see" is definitely not worth it. You're still healing, still figuring out what you should be eating. As you manage to cut all possible gluten out and heal up, then trust me, you'll know when you've accidentally gotten glutened.

For me, I know it was gluten when I few hours later my stomach starts doing flips, then the next day I'm all anxious and want to either cry or kill someone. Usually it takes a few days before my stomach can handle other food too.

Best advice, cut out the gluten, read labels, ask lots of questions when you eat out (I still have trouble doing this), and enjoy feeling better.

Peg

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I'd be very careful. I've read stories on this board about people trying to do the gluten challenge and ending up in the emergency room. Back when I started living gluten free (almost 3 years ago now) I didn't realize that I most likely had celiac. I just knew that stopping gluten and dairy was life changing. So about 2 months in we went on vacation and I thought I'd just "do my best" for the trip...and wasn't diligent at all. My experience was similar to Adalaide...did she say she also had such excruciating joint pain she couldn't get out of bed? I can't remember but it happened to me. For 3 weeks I slept 16 hours a day. I had a rash everywhere. It was so awful. Finally I ended up at the doctor's office and finally someone started talking to me about celiac and gluten intolerance. I wasn't willing to do the gluten challenge so I only have a "gluten sensitivity" although I believe in my heart I have celiac.

I think at this point you should just worry about healing and getting used to what it means to be gluten-free.

I wonder now that since I'm a few years in if I did get glutened that maybe my body would not go haywire, but I'm not willing to chance it.

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I did mention the pain but not how awful it is. I spend weeks on narcotic painkillers and while I've discussed with my doctor the fears we both have of the possibility of me becoming dependent we have both agreed that it is worth the risk. I also end up with the brain fog for a good 4-6 weeks which I'm still climbing my way out of now. Honestly, for the first 2-3 weeks I wouldn't be able to think my way out of a wet paper bag. I only wish I was dead for about a week or two, after that I start the uphill battle of feeling better until it's over. There are people who have true horror stories. How one accidental brush with gluten has left them on death's doorstep. I consider myself lucky that I only wish I was dead rather than actually being on the brink of death. I am fortunate though that due to life's circumstances I am able to consider high dose steroids as a treatment option to help alleviate symptoms, this is not an option for everyone.

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Thank you all for your nice responses. I was preparing to put up my dukes after using the word "cheat". I've seen some very unpleasant reactions at the mention of that word!

I'm glad I posted about this. I'm finding a lot of comfort in knowing that in these early stages, it's common to be frustrated in wondering, "did I get glutened or what?"

I've been having a stabbing, localized pain in my left side for the past several days. This is actually the abnormal pain that took me to the Dr. which ultimately let to my diagnosis. I thought I must have had an ulcer or diverticulitis or something. Nope. Celiac, straight out of left field. My endoscopy and colonoscopy didn't find any other cause for this stabbing pain so at this point, I'm thinking it must be my "you've been glutened" signal. Everything else that I've been feeling my whole life (and still experiencing) must be what's taking time to dissipate as I heal.

So thank you all again, very much!

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Klin, are you still drinking/eating dairy? Sometimes it's a good idea to cut it out while you heal. That might help with the stabbiness, or at least let you know that it's indeed gluten getting to you and not something else.

Just a suggestion (that I didn't follow when I started. I clung to dairy as long as possible. Now I'm casein intolerant)

Peg

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Klin, are you still drinking/eating dairy? Sometimes it's a good idea to cut it out while you heal. That might help with the stabbiness, or at least let you know that it's indeed gluten getting to you and not something else.

Just a suggestion (that I didn't follow when I started. I clung to dairy as long as possible. Now I'm casein intolerant)

Peg

Yes, I still eat dairy. I'm totally clinging to dairy!!! The stabbiness is gone. There were/are several other symptoms with the stabbiness. I'm calling it my 1st glutening so I can feel like I know how it feels and get over this feeling of needing to "cheat". Last weekend at a birthday party, I picked up my 3 y/o daughter's juice box and took a swig thinking it was my juice box. She had just finished enjoying pizza and birthday cake with that juice box. The stabbiness and discomforts started the next day.

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I wasn't sure what to say, but I guess I can tell you what it is like for me after consuming gluten accidentally. First, there is the GI symptoms that last for a few hours. Not so bad to be perfectly honest, but it is exhausting. Then, I'll really and truly be exhausted. I will sleep for more than half a day, usually more like 20 hours a day for about half a week maybe. When I can finally find the strength to keep myself upright in a chair for more than an hour at a time I'll still be so weak and tired (physically) that I can barely do anything for weeks afterward. I'll find myself going hungry because I can't find the energy to walk to the kitchen and actually make something and actually get a fork to my face afterward. There is nearly unbearable all over pain. Think like having the flu, only worse. I'll become so tender to touch that my husband loving resting his hand on my arm will be so painful I'll just start to cry. This symptom by itself is the reason I have a separate bed that I have to use for about 3-4 weeks if I've been glutened.

I promise, this is not the sort of thing you want to do to yourself on purpose. Not to know what it's like. Not to know if you are on the right track. I used to wonder that myself but as time wore on and I steadily improved a bit at a time I realized the small things I had been doing wrong but also all the things I had been doing right slowly added up. We've all done so much damage to ourselves for so long with gluten. We just need to have patience. I know it's hard. I assure you I am the queen of not having patience, but there is nothing to do in this case but simply wait. Put one foot in front of the other, get out of bed every morning with renewed purpose. Or with running feet and a full bladder... you know, whichever suits you. :P

[/quote

Feel so sorry for you .

God Bless you

pray for speedy recovery

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I dont have Celiac, but I am Gluten Intolerant. Through the last 6 months of being tested and poked, prodded and sedated, I went through various stages of being gluten free. I went totally gluten-free for a while and felt amazing. My dr told me I was fine and gluten was NOT my problem, so I went back to eating and feeling lousy. I had another dr tell me the same thing, so I kept eating it.

I finally saw a new dr who actually believed in intolerance and told me to stop, but I didnt.

I think it took another 2 more months to convince myself to stop. I go back and forth with trying to eat a little "just to see what happens" and it is the same thing...every time. I get dizzy and exhausted within 15 mins, and then a few hours later, I get a screaming headache. I get so mad when I think of the drs who told me since I didn't have Celiac Disease then it was "safe" to eat gluten. Sure, I may not have intestinal damage, but this is NOT "ok"!!1 It is NOT ok to feel lousy after eating food. I have learned the hard way...that if you react negatively AT ALL then you are having a reaction to what you ate and you should cease to eat it. Plain and simple.

It is really hard. I KNOW it is good for me to avoid it. I HAVE alternative products to eat when I feel like having a muffin, or bread. I KNOW how to cook gluten free and thankfully for me, I am not affected by cross contamination but still..when I see a warm, gooey chocolate chip cookie..its hard not to cave. But Then I think of how I will feel, even the next day and at some point I have to tell myself...no.

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Yes, our own experience can trump what a doctor tells us. They do not know everything; only we know how our body feels. Researchers and doctors are only just becoming aware of non-celiac gluten intolerance.

You really must, if you do not wish further harm down the road, resist the temptation of that gluteny gooey chocolate; goodness only knows there is enough gluten free gluteny gooey chocolate fairly readily available, even if you have to wait an hour until you bake some :)

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    • Firstly,  I was diagnosed with Hypothyroidism 18 months ago.. (TSH 39) Synthroid 100 to start with and by this April was increased intermittantly to 212mcg...  My Levels seemed to decrease initially, but then began to rise again (still at 19.42),,  Dr. referred me to a specialist (saw in May) who suspected Malabsorption to possibly the "brand" of Med and switched to Eltroxin.  My other symptoms include -Weigh GAIN, High Blood Pressure (2 meds) Extremly dry skin especially on instep of feet and all over general dryness. Ocular migranes.  Extreme fatigue and fog brain.  I have tested positive intermittantly with microscopic blood in the urine, and had a internal bladder scope showing no problems....   So, being so frustrated with the cycle weight gain causes increase BP, tiredness etc.  I did a ton of research and Started a KETO diet.. My followup (after labs) with the specialist was 3 days ago and she advised that she had labs done on Thyroid - still at 19.26 - but advised that I am positive (2 tests)  for "Silent Celiac" and I am not absorbing my meds. I told her I had gone Keto and hadn't had any grains etc for 4 weeks and I still feel the same..     So where do I go from here?
    • Hey all, I wanted to see if anyone else was in the same boat. I saw a GI for the first time 3 weeks ago after my former (pediatric) GI recommended me to him. I was diagnosed with GERD (chronic acid reflux) as a kid, and she wanted me to continue treatment as an adult. My new GI talked to me about my symptoms and my diagnosis, and told me that he thought my GERD diagnosis was wrong. He wanted me to do some bloodwork, and stop taking my anti-reflux meds before an endoscopy, just to make sure nothing else was going on. When we got my serologies back, the only abnormal thing was that my tTG-IGA tested positive for Celiac (my levels were 14, with < 3 being negative). We did the endoscopy a week later, and that was completely negative. In fact, he told me that my intestines looked like textbook-worthy, healthy intestines. Because my results didn't match, he ordered genetic tests for HLA DQ2 and DQ8. I tested positive for both, including 2 sub genes for DQ2. Because of the genetic tests and the blood tests, he officially diagnosed me with Celiac. I know that Celiac typically isn't diagnosed without a positive biopsy, so I wanted to see if anyone else had had a similar experience. I'm already feeling better after being gluten-free for less than a week, so I don't think my GI is wrong, I just think this is a pretty strange experience.
    • Congratulations!  That is such great news!  I'm sure that you feel great getting that result and knowing your hard work has paid off. 😀
    • Thank you - I had my endoscopy today and the doctor said he didn't see the telltale signs of celiac but he did biopsy. There were a number of other things he noted, like a polyp found in the fundus, and my stomach was very inflamed.       He said to start a gluten free diet right away anyway.  It is hard not to get ahead of myself and wonder about the results and if they come back negative.   
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