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Adalaide

Happy For Him

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So, after several months gluten free it was finally time for my husband to dive in and see how sick he got eating gluten. We saw his endochrinologist on Monday who said that since being gluten free hasn't relieved any of his symptoms there is no reason for him to continue on a gluten free diet. So, first things first he went straight to Pizza Hut on the way home. I was surprised that I didn't feel jealous or any sort of desire at all, I was just like meh, whatever. I just wanted this over with so he could see how sick he got and we could move on with our lives.

Well, he ate the whole pizza. He got a little bloated, but who wouldn't from eating an entire pizza. Two days later he still has felt no ill effects at all. I have to give it up that he has absolutely no gluten problems at all and his problems are caused by something else. Which is good I guess, and I'm glad he doesn't have to live with this the rest of his life. I'm glad though that he understands now what the rest of my life is.

He also said that he'll stay gluten free at home because he said it isn't as awful as he really thought and isn't a terrible inconvenience. It's far easier to eat the same thing than it is to try to cook separately. He's also rather fond of being able to kiss me without me being the gluten police. He did say though that he won't be staying gluten free away from home. This means he can't come home from work and kiss me. Yesterday I asked him to taste the soup before I gave him some. I was going to taste it too from the same spoon and he only stopped me right before I was about to put the spoon back in the pot. I have to learn to live with a gluten eater all over again. I won't cry... I won't cry... I won't cry....

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Awwww.... don't cry, Adalaide. At least he's going to stay gluten free at home.

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Mostly the hard part is having to be the kissing police. I shouldn't have to put my hands up and tell him to go brush his teeth when he gets home from work. I just isn't fair! Why can't I just kiss my husband like a normal human being? :angry:

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But he sounds so gluten aware, stopping you from using the same spoon like that. Maybe he will start brushing his teeth at work before he comes home so he can kiss you at the door. :)

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I would just be happy that you still WANT to kiss each other all the time! :lol: :lol: :lol:

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I would just be happy that you still WANT to kiss each other all the time! :lol: :lol: :lol:

I second that!!! ;)

But it is immensely easier to have a totally gluten-free hubs, I admit it.

So, let's give Addy a big (hug) and say ...sorry, hunny.

A, I would not necessarily dismiss that he has "no effects" from gluten.

Let's see what happens the more he adds back in. Not wishing him any ill health, of course. I just think your original thought was based on sound observation. Wives always know best.

(Really, it's true. It's in the wife handbook. Rule #23)

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Thanks guys! Mostly I needed to just let it all out, as I'm sure you're all familiar with.

It's simple really. Without a positive (negative really) reaction to gluten after a couple of months gluten free, or biopsy/test results saying celiac, he will not continue to stay gluten free. He is not going to go free of 600 things trying to figure out if he's intolerant to this that or a billion other things. Frankly, I don't blame him. Especially with his doctor telling him that without a positive response to the gluten free diet there is no reason to continue it and that that leaves us with the suspicion that the problems are caused by neuropthy.

And where the heck does one get a copy of this handbook? I never got mine!

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And where the heck does one get a copy of this handbook? I never got mine!

.

I have not published it yet.

Here are a few:

#13 : Never let a man pick out furniture alone. Or clothes, especially clothes for YOU.

#8: Tell him EXACTLY what you want for Christmas, or risk getting an iron or worse, a chia pet.

#6 : Go to bed angry if you want. Don't believe that "never go to bed angry schmaltzy malarkey". Let him fret all night long that he's in major trouble.

whattaya think? anything useful here?

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Frankly, I don't blame him. Especially with his doctor telling him that without a positive response to the gluten free diet there is no reason to continue it and that that leaves us with the suspicion that the problems are caused by neuropthy.

:unsure: :unsure: :ph34r:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15610706

Peripheral Neuropathy and Celiac Disease.

Chin RL, Latov N.

Source

Weill Medical College of Cornell University, Department of Neurology and Neuroscience, Peripheral Neuropathy Center, 635 Madison Avenue 4th Floor, New York, NY 10022, USA.

Abstract

Peripheral neuropathy (PN) is one of the most frequently reported neurologic manifestations associated with celiac disease (celiac disease), a multigenetic, T-cell-mediated autoimmune disorder that results from a loss of tolerance to gluten. Sensory axonal and small fiber sensory polyneuropathies are the most frequently reported PN subtypes. Multifocal motor or sensorimotor neuropathies and a more fulminant neuropathy, associated with ataxia and other neurologic manifestations, also have been reported. The effect of a gluten-free diet on celiac disease-associated PN has not been studied systematically or prospectively; nevertheless, a gluten-free diet currently is the cornerstone of therapy. Although idiopathic ataxia associated with anti-gliadin antibodies and other neurologic complications have been reported to respond to this diet; there is data that indicate that neurologic manifestations may develop or persist, independent of gluten exposure. There is evidence to suggest that inflammatory processes may be involved. Immunomodulatory agents (such as intravenous immunoglobulin or infliximab), described to be beneficial in the treatment of refractory celiac disease or celiac disease-associated ataxia, may have a role in the management of celiac disease-associated PN.

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.

#13 : Never let a man pick out furniture alone. Or clothes, especially clothes for YOU.

Or appliances.....

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Or appliances.....

Or beds.... (unless he is going to sleep in it alone) :ph34r:

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Well the shopping is taken care of. He always knows what to get me. GIRAFFES!!! He does joke though about buying me a chia pet now that I won't shut up about Udi's chia bread. OMG... time to enforce rule #8.

Thanks for the post on the neuropathy, and I wish I could blame it on celiac. I have issues with this myself which sucks. The reason his doctor was eager to jump on celiac though is because he is diabetic. Before I brought up the possibility of celiac the doctor was already thinking it was neuropathy from his diabetes so sadly we can't blame his food.

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Well, diabetes and celiac, both, have a lot to do with food :unsure: Now where the neuropathy comes from is another question. Just thought I'd throw that into the mix.

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Well, diabetes and celiac, both, have a lot to do with food :unsure: Now where the neuropathy comes from is another question. Just thought I'd throw that into the mix.

yes, my thinking is the same on this FWIW

Diabetes

+

Neuropathy

=

gluten issue

(sorry, Addy, but I have read enough research to make my head spin-- and these almost always go hand -in- hand)

The thing is if eliminating gluten can help with managing the diabetes, eventually, the neuropathy (regardless of which autoimmune condition caused it ) could very well resolve.

You know what happened to me, right? well, my doc told me he never thought the neuropathy would resolve (2 neuros told him this dire news when he consulted them about me last year) and well, they were wrong.

Just sayin.

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