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Hi and thank you.

I actually work for a Lab. I know how they diagnose Celiac Disease, I also know even after a positive scope & biopsy Dr's still won't recommend a Gluten Free Diet to their patient. They just don't understand & there is not much "mainstream" research done on Gluten.

I also know another test for Celiac. HLA Typing for Celiac Disease. Problem with that test is they only look for the DQ-2 & DQ-8. However, the DQ-1 & the DQ-3 will tell you if you are allergic to Gluten. Dr's don't look @ them. Again they don't understand.

My testing was a Wheat IgG, Barley IgG, & Rye IgG. Even if you are Gluten Free you still have antibodies and will get a number greater than 2 if you are allergic. My wife was tested for a Milk IgG (which she was diagnosed as Lactose Intolerant) and come to find out she is allergic to Milk, not "intolerant". Her & my 2 kids also tested positive for a Gluten Allergy by the way.

I have yet to see a Dr order Food IgG's on anybody. IgG's check for a Delayed Response to a allergen. I think everybody knows the body can have a instant response & delayed response to food, medication, insect bites, ect... Yet they won't order the IgG's. These tests are also sent out to a Reference Lab to be tested. They same Lab all there send out tests go to, so you know they are accurate.

Even some of the leading Gluten Researches don't talk about these tests ( Dr Mark Hyman, Dr Osborne, & Dr Alessio Fasano) it's crazy.

I've done lots of research (and testing) to try and understand Gluten and why so many people have a "issue" with it ( and a lot that don't know it).

Ahhh...

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Is this thread not about Eggs?

It would (the current discussion) serve more people regarding a gluten allergy, in a new thread, than hidden in an "Egg" thread. IMHO

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Is this thread not about Eggs?

It would (the current discussion) serve more people regarding a gluten allergy, in a new thread, than hidden in an "Egg" thread. IMHO

Again, I'm not off topic. I was called out for not being "knowledgable" about Celiac/Gluten/Digestion. I just gave a little background supporting how I know Eggs do not contain Gluten & why they don't.

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Welcome Scott!

You are correct about the lack of proper testing with regard to IgG's. My allergist only ordered them all AFTER I had already determined many of my food intolerances by strict elimination diet/trial and I was under the care of a top celiac doc whom did order genetic testing on me for DQ1, 2, 3 and 8.

That being said - Celiac Disease, Non-Celiac Gluten Intolerance (NCGI) and Gluten Allergy are often very confusing to those new to the idea that gluten may be causing them problems.

Your knowledge with regard to gluten allergy is invaluable here, but please remember your audience and make your statements clear with regard to Celiac Disease and Gluten Allergy.

Thanks :)

Thank you & I will try my best.

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Again, I'm not off topic. I was called out for not being "knowledgable" about Celiac/Gluten/Digestion. I just gave a little background supporting how I know Eggs do not contain Gluten & why they don't.

Actually, this is incorrect.

Some of us took issue with your original assertion that "gluten in chicken skin could cause a reaction."

From my personal experience with Chickens, eggs & meat are fine the skin is another story. To me that tells me they are also unable to digest Gluten because we both eliminate it through our skin. I have outward symptoms to Wheat by the way.

So, Chickens are unable to digest gluten and we both eliminate gluten through our skin?---THIS is what we questioned.

Acne. If you can't digest it, 1 of your organs has to get rid of it. For me it's my skin. Which is why when I eat the skin from Chicken, I have a reaction.... Acne.

This is also not about eggs, it's about chicken skin and that you get skin eruptions from eating chicken skin --which you believe contains undigested gluten . Again, we do not think it is because you are eating gluten-skinned chicken as we do not see how it is possible..

1st, I don't have "celiac Disease" and this is not in the "Celiac Disease" forum, it's in the "sensitivity" forum. I am allergic to Gluten. Proven through blood tests ordered by my Doctor while on a Gluten Free Diet to confirm Allergy (after the simple blood test was done, I had no need to check for "Celiac Disease"). That makes Gluten a Toxin/Food Allergy. That's the reason for that link.

2nd, I was explaining that Gluten is not in Eggs (or meat) and how I know that. I have obvious reactions to Gluten (especially Wheat).

This is the Celiac.com forum. The super sensitive section is for celiacs who are especially sensitive to gluten and incur symptoms even at the lowest levels of cc.

Allergies and Celiac disease are 2 different mechanisms.

But the point is, none of us think gluten comes out through the chicken's skin because they cannot digest it---and we asked for any evidence this could happen because we do not wish to alarm newly diagnosed celiacs that they could be glutened from chicken skin.

Do you see what we mean now?

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I'm trying to imagine chickens running around with massive Leaky Gut Syndrome, and then shedding gluten through their pores in their skin, instead of just pooping the gluten out. :huh: Sort of like it's already breaded for deep frying. It's Poultry of Mass Destruction !

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I'm trying to imagine chickens running around with massive Leaky Gut Syndrome, and then shedding gluten through their pores in their skin, instead of just pooping the gluten out. :huh: Sort of like it's already breaded for deep frying. It's Poultry of Mass Destruction !

:o:P

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It's Poultry of Mass Destruction !

:lol: beware the PMDs

well, between this thread and the simultaneous "butchered chicken and the gluten spilling out of the guts" thread we've got running, the poultry farmers should be "calling Fowl" any minute.

(oh come on, someone had to say it.... ....what? like none of you were thinking it......?)

To the original poster, Carolynmay....sorry for the incredible turn this took. I didn't see that coming when I told you that you would get yes and no answers.

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I seem to have a reaction to eggs, both the yolk and the white. I haven't tried just yolk in awhile, but the last time I tried egg whites they bothered my stomach some and I felt extremely tired and generally bad all day. Pretty sure it's not a gluten reaction, I guess it's just an intolerance to eggs. Very weird but what can ya do.

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I seem to have a reaction to eggs, both the yolk and the white. I haven't tried just yolk in awhile, but the last time I tried egg whites they bothered my stomach some and I felt extremely tired and generally bad all day. Pretty sure it's not a gluten reaction, I guess it's just an intolerance to eggs. Very weird but what can ya do.

Oh Joe...me too...eggs give me grief. NOT baked IN things, but eaten "plain".... No idea why. It just "is".

Truer words were never spoken. Thanks for posting!

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I also can not eat eggs by themselves. As an ingredient, fine, but just plain eggs give me horrible nausea.

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I also can not eat eggs by themselves. As an ingredient, fine, but just plain eggs give me horrible nausea.

yes, me too, Patti...and not just since DX--my whole life.... and I have researched this for years and asked my hubs, the chemist if there is a reason. (cooking temps perhaps? he says "could be") .and I cannot find any explanation for it.

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That's ok - it's all made for an interesting read! Shall be having nightmares about Poultry of Mass Destruction for some time :-)

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I also can not eat eggs by themselves. As an ingredient, fine, but just plain eggs give me horrible nausea.

When Skeeter was first diagnosed, she also had allergy testing done. She came back with a very mild allergy to eggs. The nurse that called with the results said that at that level, she could have eggs as long as it was an ingredient of something. Just don't serve her a plate of eggs. Skeeter had never liked eggs and would complain about her stomach being upset when she did. It's been five years and she may have outgrown it, but I doubt she will ever eat just plain eggs . . . it made that kind of impression.

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Just plain eggs give me horrible gas. But like many others, not when baked into

something. What a strange phenomenon.

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It is interesting--and evidently not too uncommon.

I ate eggs as a child but somewhere around my mid 20's, I began to realize whenever I ate them (we used to go out to breakfast on Sunday) I would be sick to my stomach later that day.

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That's ok - it's all made for an interesting read! :D

...oh , it's all that! Glad you asked?? :D

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That's ok - it's all made for an interesting read! Shall be having nightmares about Poultry of Mass Destruction for some time :-)

Glad you're here. Interestiing, indeed :rolleyes: . And please continue to explore your quest to find the support YOU need on your road to health. :)

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For those of us who can inexplicably eat eggs baked IN things, but not alone, Sylvia and I both saw a short article in Living Without Mag that explains a study done on children with egg allergies. The study concluded that a majority of these kiddos could tolerate them again just fine--if baked in foods (although a few had mild symptoms), so I tried to access the published study, but could only get the abstract which may be of some interest to you.

It concluded with:

Conclusion

Initiation of a baked egg diet accelerates the development of regular egg tolerance compared with strict avoidance. Higher serum EW-specific IgE level is associated with persistent baked and regular egg reactivity, while initial baked egg reactivity is not.

darn it----It will not let me link it for some reason, but here it is

The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

Volume 130, Issue 2 , Pages 473-480.e1, August 2012

Dietary baked egg accelerates resolution of egg allergy in children

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For those of us who can inexplicably eat eggs baked IN things, but not alone, Sylvia and I both saw a short article in Living Without Mag that explains a study done on children with egg allergies. The study concluded that a majority of these kiddos could tolerate them again just fine--if baked in foods (although a few had mild symptoms), so I tried to access the published study, but could only get the abstract which may be of some interest to you.

It concluded with:

Conclusion

Initiation of a baked egg diet accelerates the development of regular egg tolerance compared with strict avoidance. Higher serum EW-specific IgE level is associated with persistent baked and regular egg reactivity, while initial baked egg reactivity is not.

darn it----It will not let me link it for some reason, but here it is

The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

Volume 130, Issue 2 , Pages 473-480.e1, August 2012

Dietary baked egg accelerates resolution of egg allergy in children

Good to know its a real thing. I know someone who says she is allergic to eggs but would chow down on cookies and cakes. Of course she is also allergic to any foods she doesn't like, too. :blink:

She is also the person who told me she researched Celiac alot because she thought she might have it. She found that the only way to know if you have it is, when you die, to get autopsied. :ph34r:

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She is also the person who told me she researched Celiac alot because she thought she might have it. She found that the only way to know if you have it is, when you die, to get autopsied. :ph34r:

:unsure: The ultimate in "I told you I had it , dammit!".

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two of my kids have the eggs in baked goods dealio - one gets digestive issues when eating plain eggs and the other has more of a texture problem with eggs -- can't believe it is one of the few things I can tolerate - am very grateful for the incredible edible egg!

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Never ate eggs as a child as hated them.

We have our own chooks now and I seem to be fine with them.

Give them a scoop of organic wheat each afternoon (hubs deals with chook food feeding - available to them all the time) and wash my hands after - picking up eggs anyway, so would of course.

I seem to be fine with them - often eat two hard boiled hot before doing a lot of exercise and they really keep me going (with energy, I mean). :D .

Actually I thought that birds were the one animal designed to be able to digest grain - warning, could be talking nonsense here :ph34r: !

It annoys me that their organic wheat contains soya - why is soya in almost everything :angry: !

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- why is soya in almost everything :angry: !

Good question :angry: indeed..... darn soy!

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I don't have any scientific evidence that there is gluten in eggs. I only have my own experiences and those of my children which are subjective. It isn't easy finding chickens that aren't fed supplemental grain here either, especially in the winter. I live in the northern part of the country. I had eliminated eggs from the grocery store as I felt better when I didn't eat them. Then I found a farmer at a farmer's market who pasture raised her chickens and I started eating her eggs without any issues. When it got cold, I found that they were making me sick. I talked to her about it and she told me that they get wheat in the cold season. Now what I do is freeze a bunch of eggs during the summer when they don't make me sick, and then I have them to eat when the cold season comes along and they start to make me sick. My children also have problems with the eggs that coincide with mine.

Of course, this could all be in my head, and the power of my personality may be affecting my children, but those are my experiences.

I think that I am either a nut case, or much more sensitive than your average super sensitive celiac.

It's no in your head, if tour super sensitive (like me and my son) then you are grtting slightly glutened by the eggs (which sucks because we LOVE eggs. I have been purchasing cage free grain fed chickens and I do feel glutened after eating them but only last a shott while but its a indefinate reaction and its still there ugh! We have a local co-op store I am going to try theres next time and will not be buying eggs from our local supermarket anymore this winter .. I hate bejng so sensitive.. Its also there with some meats!

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