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Not Trying Enough New Foods...scared Of Allergies..

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Krista, I think at this point you really just have to make a list of all the things you suspect could

be your problem, remove them ALL, and then after a few weeks add one back at a time. This

is the definition of an elimination diet.

Like other posters have said, have a plan for when you add a food back. Make sure another adult is

around for if any issues arise, make sure it's a day off of work. I understand that you have a phobia

of illness, and I totally understand, as one of my Celiac symptoms was horrendous, unrelenting

nausea. But you won't solve anything by 'wondering' about it. Every single thing you have asked,

whether it's spices, tomatoes, nightshades, salicylates, all of that is POSSIBLE, but truly just does

not sound likely. The reaction you described was really quite mild in the grand scheme of things. It's

POSSIBLE that your body just didn't like the Schar crust. It may have some preservative in it that

doesn't agree with you.

I'm going to second Tiffany's suggestion and ask if you might want to get some professional assistance

with your phobia of illness, because it seems like it's really a problem for you. I hope something like

that could help, because you sound really unhappy with it.

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I guess what I'm not clear on is...is the above poster suggesting stopping the fries for a week then bringing it back and seeing what happens? Because everything else i haven't been touching.

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If nothing has been bothering you at all for a week, then yes, this is the perfect scenario. it is time to find out what does bother you. Pick a new food that you think will not bother you. If you are fine with that one for a week then try another. Keep a diary of when you try things and what reaction you have, if any. That way you can tell when to test that food again, and see if the reaction is the same.

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So should I give up the potato for a week even though I seem fine with it? I tried sweet potato last night and intend to eat a bit every day to be sure for maybe 3 days then move on to turnip greens.

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So should I give up the potato for a week even though I seem fine with it? I tried sweet potato last night and intend to eat a bit every day to be sure for maybe 3 days then move on to turnip greens.

No, Neroli's point was that you have been feeling fine, and have not been having any

problems, therefore, you have reached what we'll call the 'base point' of an elimination

diet. Right now, nothing is bothering you. Yay! Now is the time to start ADDING things.

Slowly, one at a time. And not every 3 days- only one a week. You want to give yourself

plenty of time to observe any reactions.

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If sals are a problem for you, you DO know that tomatoes are very high sals, right? And sals build up in your system so you can eat something once, twice, and maybe the third time you will have reached your tipping point and it will make you sick.

I eat broccoli a lot too, and I eat sweet potatoes almost every day. It's the only way I can get enough vitamins because I really don't think they make a multi that I can take.

So I eat a small amount of sweet potato every day and broccoli about three times a week. Then I eat pistachios, but if I eat more than 10 or 12, I get sick. I have found my tipping point. If there is a high sals food that I can't resist anymore, I eat white potatoes instead of sweet potatoes, cauliflower instead of broccoli, and walnuts instead of pistachios for a while. After my system is clear, I can eat some of the high sals food I have been craving.

That warning you read about anaphylactic shock is a bit extreme IMO. Aspirin, yes, but not the foods. Aspirin has like 100 times more sals than the high sals foods. I'll never touch it again, but the foods - when I get "sick" from too many sals it consists of a psoriasis flare and that terrible jaw pain. I don't even get sick to my stomach. It seems only gluten itself does that to me.

Of course we are all different, but I think even if sals are your problem, you can tolerate some. You just need to find your tipping point, and the only way to do that is by eating the sals foods you already eat, then try adding one higher sals serving a week. If that doesn't get you, try two. If that doesn't get you, try more. When you finally have a reaction, take a break from anything high or very high, to clear your system, then you will know - however many times a week you were able to tolerate a food, that's your tipping point.

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I really would like to know if i have an aspirin allergy i have to say because my husbands aunt who is also celiac said that means you can't even have motrin etc. It would be really nice to know if i actually have an allergy to that is there a test?

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I don't know if there is a test or not. I imagine you could google it or ask your doctor. But I DO know that I can't take ibuprofen or naproxin. (Advil, Motrin, or Aleve.) I don't get an allergic reaction, but my prosiasis flares like fire, and my jaw gets unbelievably bad. All I can take is Tylenol.

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I would be surprised if anyone has much more allergens and higher IgE antibody levels than I do at the moment and I can eat peanuts, all kinds of nuts infact and any other food I feel like, all it does is raise my immune system to a higher state and release more eosonphil cells that ruin my gut further but I've never reached a state of shock or anything like that from eating a food, nothing worse than cramps and sitting on the toilet for a while while wont calm down. With Celiac type disorders you are just fighting against a worn out gut and having an immune response to protiens that are being seen by the immune system undigested and mistaken as something bad (parasite etc). It's not more complicated than that. It's not the same deal as people that are especailly sensitive to a bee sting or a peanut.. My levels IgE levels are over 4000 not because I'll drop dead if I see one allergen, they are that high because I'm intollerent to 100 things because of the damaged digestive system

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there are no tests for intolerences as far as i know outside of removing them completely from your diet than readding them later.

Yes there are. But getting someone to do them can be tough and expensive. My mom, daughter and I all had the IgG food allergy (intolerance) tests done at two different naturopaths. I didn't like the one. Not only did he charge ove $2,000 for the testing but he also insisted that we buy some very expensive supplements from him, all of which we could buy for a lot less online. But he insisted that my daughter take some stuff that is for Alzheimers. And she was 6 at the time!

The other naturopath is deceased now. And the one that we currently see doesn't believe in IgG allergies.

More recently we had hair testing done. I found it online. Some people believe it is all a bunch of hooey but it really did help us a lot. Turns out we were both intolerant to a lot of herbs and spices and she is intolerant to flax. When she was on the gluten-free diet she was eating a lot of flax. I accidentally bought her a sandwich on Udi's bread the other day that had flax in it. I don't know that it was the bread itself that had the flax. But the tuna sandwich did. I was in a hurry when I bought it and didn't notice the flax until I got it home. I told her she could try it if she wanted to. They do tell you unless you have an actual allergy to whatever the food is to try it and see what your reaction is. Hers was wanting to vomit. So... No more of that.

The amazing thing for me was that after changing my diet, I haven't been sick at all with whatever is going around like colds or the flu. and I used to be sick almost all the time!

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I don't know if there is a test or not. I imagine you could google it or ask your doctor. But I DO know that I can't take ibuprofen or naproxin. (Advil, Motrin, or Aleve.) I don't get an allergic reaction, but my prosiasis flares like fire, and my jaw gets unbelievably bad. All I can take is Tylenol.

Interesting! My gastro told me I can only take Tylenol and I don't because when I have tried it in the past, it didn't do a danged thing. I do have psoriasis. Just not sure what makes it worse.

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I really would like to know if i have an aspirin allergy i have to say because my husbands aunt who is also celiac said that means you can't even have motrin etc. It would be really nice to know if i actually have an allergy to that is there a test?

An allergist can test you for whatever you think you need to be tested for.

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Asprin and moltren are part of the same family NSAIDS (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-steroidal_anti-inflammatory_drug). IF you have an allergy to one of those, consider the rest off limits because they all act in a similar manner (this also includes but is not limited to alieve and advil). You do not want this allergy at all. There is no testing as far as i know. It is very difficult to live with if you have body pain issues (joint and muscle aches) because what is left really doesn't touch it. You also have to run everything by a pharmacist to ensure that there is no NSAIDS in the medication that you wish to take.

Like mentioned, talking to an allergist might be a good idea if you are concerned about such things.

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Here's a direct link to where they talk about when you re-introduce to be careful. http://salicylatesen...vity.com/info5/

Have you read the disclaimer on the lower left of this web site. the person who made this website is not a clinician . you have to be careful of what you read and make a decision on your own when you want to eat foods again. as for the allergy testing the only thing you can't do before testing is have any antihistamines 7- 10 days prior due to it will mess with testing. it seems to me that maybe you were eating too many jalapeno chips or too much of one food that can cause GERD symptoms. sometimes we can get diarrhea becuase of a stomach bug and not from a reaction to foods or gluten. if you like a certain food it should be everything in moderation.. also you need to be cafeful with some tomato paste because there is a brand out there for the italian seasoning one that does contain wheat.. try to relax and enjoy your life each day is precious and there are plenty of foods out there for you to enjoy... baby steps

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I did a blood test for IGG food intolerances. Some of my experience with it is posted in my blog. The idea of the test is to find antibodies for specific foods. If there are antibodies to it, one's body is treating it as foreign matter which it should attack. Don't panic, however, a rotational diet can stay ahead of the body's fight. To make this basic one eats the same things for one 24 hour period and then you wait to eat it again for four days. I don't understand why this works, but so far I am feeling better after starting to try to do it.

You can also do a blood test for your IGE level, or for IGE reactions to foods. This might give you an idea if you are having true allergic reactions to food. These CAN BE very dangerous. But I believe it is rare to die of them. If there is a true allergy you would need to avoid the food forever.

I know the feeling of being afraid to add foods in. Some days lately I feel like going hungry rather than settling the question what to eat. Thus far I am still eating. I found some foods like eggs, chicken, and cucumber that I had been eatings, but didn't have anti-bodies for. This meant my body handles them well. Yet, I don't want to overdue them and risk problems with them, so the rotational diet is my recent attempt. Maybe you could try considering the positive values of the food as you are adding.

Such as Fish:

Vitamin A

Vitamin B

Some are high in healthy fatty acids.

The desperate Lady feels better when she eats it.

There are so many foods to try. Maybe you could try some that you have never tried. Fennel bulb is a vegetable that has a light licorice flavor. I think foods you have not tried, are not as likely to cause a reaction as one's you haven't overeaten in the past. I recently bought noodles made from kelp. My whole family seemed to like them!

Just because someone else on the forum has a particular food it doesn't mean you will. I do use the forum for ideas also, but you still need to reason and try it out for yourself. I hate to have someone strung out with worry about it.

If you want lists of foods to try let us know. I have all of the foods that were on my food intolerance tests. That would be an easy list. It is mostly common foods, though.

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PPI's increase your risk of developing celiac disease in the future. that is over 4 years old that studied this topic of PPIs use and subsequent Celiac disease diagnosis. https://www.celiac.com/articles.html/celiac-disease-gluten-intolerance-research/do-proton-pump-inhibitors-increase-risk-of-celiac-disease-r2860/ they (the researchers) concluded  quoting "The data clearly show that patients who use anti-secretory medications are at much greater risk for developing celiac disease following the use of these medicines. 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If you get a "warm sensation" in your abdomen it is working. ******this is not medical advice but I hope this is helpful. I had a similar problem with my low stomach acid being misdiagnosed. Sorry the explanation is so long but you got a lot going on inside.. . and it takes some time to try and explain it. 2 Tim 2:7 “Consider what I say; and the Lord give thee understanding in all things” this included. Posterboy by the Grace of God,
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