Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

Hi everyone,

I was diagnosed as being 'gluten sensitive' (whatever that means) about 5 months ago when a doctor finally realized my 'malabsorption' of magnesium and other vitamins was causing my life long (23 years) migraine disorder. After months of taking a 3x the regular dose of vitamins just to stay alive - a doc finally made the gluten connection. Now I can stop spending all my money on vitamins!

Anyways, I started a strict gluten-free diet almost a month ago, and after an initial 2 week period in which I felt INCREDIBLE - I feel like I'm hitting some serious detox symptoms.

I missed a period completely (has never happened before, and it's back now - not pregnant), I broke out in RIDICULOUS acne on my face, back and chest (I've always had mild acne.. but it now worse than it has EVER been) and I've been ridiculously hungry and cranky. I ate more in two weeks than I ever had in my LIFE.

I feel like the symptoms are starting to let up a bit now - but they hit their real peek about 1.5 months into being gluten free. My period is back, and most of the acne is starting to scab over.. but man I wanted to hide underground things got so bad..

So, this is plea in hopes that my experience isn't totally abnormal - perhaps there is some light at the end of this tunnel?? is this going to get better :(?

Any advice or experience would be appreciated. THANK YOU ALL SO MUCH.

Reading this forum has been a lifesaver for me overall.

**also, since going gluten-free and being able to slightly lower the vitamin dose - I am still migraine free! So that is one good thing. (and by migraine disorder, I mean it was so bad I was considered disabled until this year.. A MIRACLE)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


So, this is plea in hopes that my experience isn't totally abnormal - perhaps there is some light at the end of this tunnel?? is this going to get better :(?

Hi Steph:

The answers are Yes! Yes! and Yes!!! You are right on the normal curve of post-gluten recovery. Such a relief to get rid of the gluten, feel terrific, and then the body says, "Wait a minute, I was addicted to that stuff, I think I need it!!! Gimme, gimme, gimme" and you are in withdrawal, grumpy, and out of sorts and, as you say, detoxing. You are also starving for the nutrients you have not been able to absorb and this hunger period goes away after a while. Right now, just go with it because your body needs the nourishment. It will know when to stop. I hope your acne keeps on improving.

What a great thing that your migraines have gone already!! Yay, a miracle indeed.

Welcome to the board and if there is any way we can help, let us know.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could be detoxing but you could also be getting CC somewhere. We do often become more sensitive to very small amounts of gluten after we are gluten free. Make sure you are doing everything at home to make sure that you are safe and since you are experiencing skin issues do make sure all your shampoos etc are free of gluten. Welcome to the board and congrats on the migraine issue. I suffered from them also for many years but not as badly as you did. It is quite a relief when the pain stops.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went through a lot of that too, including the acne. I ate a tonne for about 2 months, and I lost 10 lbs doing it, and then my appetite dropped way down. I'm now not nearly as hungry as i was before going gluten-free.

It really is great to lose the migraines isn't it! Mine weren't as bad as yours but I had days where turning your eyes hurt, and when it became hard to drive or read because my vision was jumping around so much. I had no idea my headaches were linked to gluten so losing them was a very pleasant surprise. :)

Hang in there. I'm sure it will continue to improve for you too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you everyone - it is definitely uplifting to hear such positive outcomes!! I'd never wish this on ANYONE, but it is really nice to not feel alone.

The acne has been horrific, mainly because it is of the extremely large and scarring cystic variety that actually made it too painful to sleep some nights! *fingers crossed there isn't much left of that!*

I forgot to add that during the strange 'missed period' time I had INTENSE night sweats. Normally, I get 'sweaty' a day or two before my period, but this time I was waking up soaked for weeks on end. I'm not even 30 and I was almost sure I had suddenly hit menopause.. cue panic attack!

That has died down thus far and I'm hoping that continues (I'm sure if any of you have experience that.. the soaking sweats are a bit awkward ...nevermind gross, cold, dehydrating etc.)

ravenwoodglass - I didn't even think of checking my personal care products - I will DEFINITELY be super sleuth this afternoon and throw out any offending shampoos/creams etc.

Also, thank you Mushroom and Nvsmom - You definitely put my mind at ease today. This gluten stuff sure is crazy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


Hi everyone,

I was diagnosed as being 'gluten sensitive' (whatever that means) about 5 months ago when a doctor finally realized my 'malabsorption' of magnesium and other vitamins was causing my life long (23 years) migraine disorder. After months of taking a 3x the regular dose of vitamins just to stay alive - a doc finally made the gluten connection. Now I can stop spending all my money on vitamins!

Anyways, I started a strict gluten-free diet almost a month ago, and after an initial 2 week period in which I felt INCREDIBLE - I feel like I'm hitting some serious detox symptoms.

I missed a period completely (has never happened before, and it's back now - not pregnant), I broke out in RIDICULOUS acne on my face, back and chest (I've always had mild acne.. but it now worse than it has EVER been) and I've been ridiculously hungry and cranky. I ate more in two weeks than I ever had in my LIFE.

I feel like the symptoms are starting to let up a bit now - but they hit their real peek about 1.5 months into being gluten free. My period is back, and most of the acne is starting to scab over.. but man I wanted to hide underground things got so bad..

So, this is plea in hopes that my experience isn't totally abnormal - perhaps there is some light at the end of this tunnel?? is this going to get better :(?

Any advice or experience would be appreciated. THANK YOU ALL SO MUCH.

Reading this forum has been a lifesaver for me overall.

**also, since going gluten-free and being able to slightly lower the vitamin dose - I am still migraine free! So that is one good thing. (and by migraine disorder, I mean it was so bad I was considered disabled until this year.. A MIRACLE)

A lot of us find we have other sensitivities after clearing gluten from our systems. I suggest getting a little notebook and writing down everything you eat. Note any symptoms you experience. Many food sensitivities have delayed symptoms and keeping the log makes it easier to put the pieces of the puzzle together.

I also advise taking probiotics, and eating a "whole foods" diet. In other words, eat unprosessed meats, veggies, fruits, nuts, and eggs. Buy organic produce if you can..especially while you're healing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi everyone,

I was diagnosed as being 'gluten sensitive' (whatever that means) about 5 months ago when a doctor finally realized my 'malabsorption' of magnesium and other vitamins was causing my life long (23 years) migraine disorder. After months of taking a 3x the regular dose of vitamins just to stay alive - a doc finally made the gluten connection. Now I can stop spending all my money on vitamins!

Anyways, I started a strict gluten-free diet almost a month ago, and after an initial 2 week period in which I felt INCREDIBLE - I feel like I'm hitting some serious detox symptoms.

I missed a period completely (has never happened before, and it's back now - not pregnant), I broke out in RIDICULOUS acne on my face, back and chest (I've always had mild acne.. but it now worse than it has EVER been) and I've been ridiculously hungry and cranky. I ate more in two weeks than I ever had in my LIFE.

I feel like the symptoms are starting to let up a bit now - but they hit their real peek about 1.5 months into being gluten free. My period is back, and most of the acne is starting to scab over.. but man I wanted to hide underground things got so bad..

So, this is plea in hopes that my experience isn't totally abnormal - perhaps there is some light at the end of this tunnel?? is this going to get better :(?

Any advice or experience would be appreciated. THANK YOU ALL SO MUCH.

Reading this forum has been a lifesaver for me overall.

**also, since going gluten-free and being able to slightly lower the vitamin dose - I am still migraine free! So that is one good thing. (and by migraine disorder, I mean it was so bad I was considered disabled until this year.. A MIRACLE)

Hi!

After reading your post, I was doing a little researching about your painful acne. I've been dealing w eczema, and I don't really understand why....really hoping it will go away :/. Anyway, you may have already figured this out, but do you think the acne really could be "Dermitis Herpetiformis"? Sounds like its pretty painful :(

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi!

After reading your post, I was doing a little researching about your painful acne. I've been dealing w eczema, and I don't really understand why....really hoping it will go away :/. Anyway, you may have already figured this out, but do you think the acne really could be "Dermitis Herpetiformis"? Sounds like its pretty painful :(

I really hope your eczema goes away too.. I used to have that CONSTANTLY (and in weird places, sides of my arms, jaw line, stomach..??!) I just started researching Dermititis Herpetiformis, and I think it's possibly what I'm dealing with.. right now some of the spots look a bit too cystic/nodular so I think a lot of it is still acne.. but who knows! maybe it's an awful combination of both at this point.

It's bad enough today (face, neck, chest, back, arms) to keep me in the house.. since my mother even said .. WOAH DO YOU HAVE MEASLES OR SOMETHING?!?!

*sigh* keeping fingers crossed that this isn't some kind of new normal. Good luck with your eczema. I found the really thick 'Eucerin Original Creme' helped keep mine in some kind of manageable state.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow... I'm sooo sorry to hear that!!! You may have already done this, but have you done a serious change in your diet? I mean, like more than just stopping the gluten (AND soy... It's THE BIGGEST contaminator! Seriously.)...? I just finished the Clean Program. Seriously- it's amazing. Go to thecleanprogram.com, and read about it all. I did not buy any of the products they sell. You can do it all w your own products (which I can tell you about). The program has you eat specific foods, and avoid all of the allergen producing foods. It allows your body/system to reset, and then detox. Like some of the others have said, it's a way to find out what other things you may be reacting too. Again- you may already know all of this, or have tried an elimination diet, etc. Just thought I'd mention this one, along w the soy issue. Also- are you taking an antihistamine of any sort? I had full body hives for the past year (prior to finding out I had Celiac). A specialist I saw told me it was perfectly safe to load up on antihistamines to "retrain my body to stop producing histamine". So, I took Allegra 180 3-4 times a day. It really helped them to stop. Have you seen an allergy/asthma specialize? He/she might be able to tell you more. I will want to help you! I called myself Quasimodo because I was so deformed that I couldn't leave the house either :/.

I wanted to know- what is "tonne", that you said you ate for 2 months?

I went through a lot of that too, including the acne. I ate a tonne for about 2 months, and I lost 10 lbs doing it, and then my appetite dropped way down. I'm now not nearly as hungry as i was before going gluten-free.

It really is great to lose the migraines isn't it! Mine weren't as bad as yours but I had days where turning your eyes hurt, and when it became hard to drive or read because my vision was jumping around so much. I had no idea my headaches were linked to gluten so losing them was a very pleasant surprise. :)

Hang in there. I'm sure it will continue to improve for you too.

I really hope your eczema goes away too.. I used to have that CONSTANTLY (and in weird places, sides of my arms, jaw line, stomach..??!) I just started researching Dermititis Herpetiformis, and I think it's possibly what I'm dealing with.. right now some of the spots look a bit too cystic/nodular so I think a lot of it is still acne.. but who knows! maybe it's an awful combination of both at this point.

It's bad enough today (face, neck, chest, back, arms) to keep me in the house.. since my mother even said .. WOAH DO YOU HAVE MEASLES OR SOMETHING?!?!

*sigh* keeping fingers crossed that this isn't some kind of new normal. Good luck with your eczema. I found the really thick 'Eucerin Original Creme' helped keep mine in some kind of manageable state.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow... I'm sooo sorry to hear that!!! You may have already done this, but have you done a serious change in your diet? I mean, like more than just stopping the gluten (AND soy... It's THE BIGGEST contaminator! Seriously.)...? I just finished the Clean Program. Seriously- it's amazing. Go to thecleanprogram.com, and read about it all. I did not buy any of the products they sell. You can do it all w your own products (which I can tell you about). The program has you eat specific foods, and avoid all of the allergen producing foods. It allows your body/system to reset, and then detox. Like some of the others have said, it's a way to find out what other things you may be reacting too. Again- you may already know all of this, or have tried an elimination diet, etc. Just thought I'd mention this one, along w the soy issue. Also- are you taking an antihistamine of any sort? I had full body hives for the past year (prior to finding out I had Celiac). A specialist I saw told me it was perfectly safe to load up on antihistamines to "retrain my body to stop producing histamine". So, I took Allegra 180 3-4 times a day. It really helped them to stop. Have you seen an allergy/asthma specialize? He/she might be able to tell you more. I will want to help you! I called myself Quasimodo because I was so deformed that I couldn't leave the house either :/.

I wanted to know- what is "tonne", that you said you ate for 2 months?

I've definitely done a serious diet change in the last two months.. before I cut out gluten - I pretty much only ate gluten! I've always been underweight, but I am(was) a carb-oholic. I think I ate more whole wheat pasta, bread, crackers.. etc. than anyone I know!

I've never been able to eat soy (estrogen sensitive) so I pretty much avoid it all together anyways. However, I'm definitely going to check out the clean program right now, I'm having trouble figuring out what to eat these days so that will definitely help!

To clarify - the 'tonne' that I ate in the last few weeks wasn't 'great'.. mainly rice, beans (my mother is on 'the rice diet' so these things are always available and what I usually eat regardless. I definitely wasn't eating enough vegetables/fruit though.

Thank you for the antihistamine advice! That also sounds like an excellent idea - I'll try one out for a while and see if it helps at all. Unfortunately there aren't any allergy specialists in my area and the naturopath is currently unaffordable, but I'm looking to move soon anyways and hopefully can get in contact with someone who can help figure this all out! Until then perhaps the 'clean' diet will reveal some more intolerances/allergies and help me get whatever this is out of my system. :D!

So far the crazy outbreak of whatever is still going strong :/ guh. *fingers crossed*

Thank you so much for all of your recommendations!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


*UPDATE* 3-4 Months later.

Hi Everyone, I just wanted to update this post with some results.

I wrote in December regarding a SEVERE detox/post gluten free I was experiencing that was absolutely miserable.  HOWEVER, I remained strictly gluten-free (100% - I'm really REALLY careful) and I can happily say now that after 3-4 months, my skin and health are better than they have ever been.

My skin is CLEAR (okay, not perfect, whose is?) but compared to the cystic-acne nightmare that covered my back, arms, face, neck, chest, etc... I now only have small breakouts on my face. Something I consider 'normal' so I no longer feel like hiding in my basement.

I also have been able to start weening myself off more of the supplements I usually desperately needed. I was constantly depleted of magnesium and vitamin B -- and now I seem to be retaining it.    As a bonus - my hair is starting to grow back!!!  After surgery, other illness, etc.  my hair had thinned dramatically and I gave up thinking it would come back..  The only downside is the hair thats coming back - is grey haha.  I'm in my early twenties so that's thrilling, but hey! it's hair! :D

I hope this post helps others when they are deciding 'is all this gluten-free hasse worth it? I feel worse!' - there IS a light at the end of the tunnel. 

Goodluck to all of you, and best wishes for good health!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congrats!  :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is fantastic news :)

My skin has cleared since gluten-free in September, isn't it great?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

get your copper level checked, a def can contribute to loss of hair color.

*UPDATE* 3-4 Months later.

Hi Everyone, I just wanted to update this post with some results.

I wrote in December regarding a SEVERE detox/post gluten free I was experiencing that was absolutely miserable.  HOWEVER, I remained strictly gluten-free (100% - I'm really REALLY careful) and I can happily say now that after 3-4 months, my skin and health are better than they have ever been.

My skin is CLEAR (okay, not perfect, whose is?) but compared to the cystic-acne nightmare that covered my back, arms, face, neck, chest, etc... I now only have small breakouts on my face. Something I consider 'normal' so I no longer feel like hiding in my basement.

I also have been able to start weening myself off more of the supplements I usually desperately needed. I was constantly depleted of magnesium and vitamin B -- and now I seem to be retaining it.    As a bonus - my hair is starting to grow back!!!  After surgery, other illness, etc.  my hair had thinned dramatically and I gave up thinking it would come back..  The only downside is the hair thats coming back - is grey haha.  I'm in my early twenties so that's thrilling, but hey! it's hair! :D

I hope this post helps others when they are deciding 'is all this gluten-free hasse worth it? I feel worse!' - there IS a light at the end of the tunnel. 

Goodluck to all of you, and best wishes for good health!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
0

  • Who's Online   11 Members, 0 Anonymous, 321 Guests (See full list)

  • Top Posters +

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/19/2018 - Maintaining a gluten-free diet can be an on-going challenge, especially when you factor in all the hidden or obscure gluten that can trip you up. In many cases, foods that are naturally gluten-free end up contain added gluten. Sometimes this can slip by us, and that when the suffering begins. To avoid suffering needlessly, be sure to keep a sharp eye on labels, and beware of added or hidden gluten, even in food labeled gluten-free.  Use Celiac.com's SAFE Gluten-Free Food List and UNSAFE Gluten-free Food List as a guide.
    Also, beware of these common mistakes that can ruin your gluten-free diet. Watch out for:
    Watch out for naturally gluten-free foods like rice and soy, that use gluten-based ingredients in processing. For example, many rice and soy beverages are made using barley enzymes, which can cause immune reactions in people with celiac disease. Be careful of bad advice from food store employees, who may be misinformed themselves. For example, many folks mistakenly believe that wheat-based grains like spelt or kamut are safe for celiacs. Be careful when taking advice. Beware of cross-contamination between food store bins selling raw flours and grains, often via the food scoops. Be careful to avoid wheat-bread crumbs in butter, jams, toaster, counter surface, etc. Watch out for hidden gluten in prescription drugs. Ask your pharmacist for help about anything you’re not sure about, or suspect might contain unwanted gluten. Watch out for hidden gluten in lotions, conditioners, shampoos, deodorants, creams and cosmetics, (primarily for those with dermatitis herpetaformis). Be mindful of stamps, envelopes or other gummed labels, as these can often contain wheat paste. Use a sponge to moisten such surfaces. Be careful about hidden gluten in toothpaste and mouthwash. Be careful about common cereal ingredients, such as malt flavoring, or other non-gluten-free ingredient. Be extra careful when considering packaged mixes and sauces, including soy sauce, fish sauce, catsup, mustard, mayonnaise, etc., as many of these can contain wheat or wheat by-product in their manufacture. Be especially careful about gravy mixes, packets & canned soups. Even some brands of rice paper can contain gluten, so be careful. Lastly, watch out for foods like ice cream and yogurt, which are often gluten-free, but can also often contain added ingredients that can make them unsuitable for anyone on a gluten-free diet. Eating Out? If you eat out, consider that many restaurants use a shared grill or shared cooking oil for regular and gluten-free foods, so be careful. Also, watch for flour in otherwise gluten-free spices, as per above. Ask questions, and stay vigilant.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/18/2018 - Despite many studies on immune development in children, there still isn’t much good data on how a mother’s diet during pregnancy and infancy influences a child’s immune development.  A team of researchers recently set out to assess whether changes in maternal or infant diet might influence the risk of allergies or autoimmune disease.
    The team included Vanessa Garcia-Larsen, Despo Ierodiakonou, Katharine Jarrold, Sergio Cunha,  Jennifer Chivinge, Zoe Robinson, Natalie Geoghegan, Alisha Ruparelia, Pooja Devani, Marialena Trivella, Jo Leonardi-Bee, and Robert J. Boyle.
    They are variously associated with the Department of Undiagnosed Celiac Disease More Common in Women and Girls International Health, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America; the Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine and Public Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; the Section of Paediatrics, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; the Centre for Statistics in Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom; the Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom; and Stanford University in the USA.
    Team members searched MEDLINE, Excerpta Medica dataBASE (EMBASE), Web of Science, Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) for observational studies conducted between January 1946 and July 2013, and interventional studies conducted through December 2017, that evaluated the relationship between diet during pregnancy, lactation, or the first year of life, and future risk of allergic or autoimmune disease. 
    They then selected studies, extracted data, and assessed bias risk. They evaluated data using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE). They found 260 original studies, covering 964,143 participants, of milk feeding, including 1 intervention trial of breastfeeding promotion, and 173 original studies, covering 542,672 participants, of other maternal or infant dietary exposures, including 80 trials of 26 maternal, 32 infant, or 22 combined interventions. 
    They found a high bias risk in nearly half of the more than 250 milk feeding studies and in about one-quarter of studies of other dietary exposures. Evidence from 19 intervention trials suggests that oral supplementation with probiotics during late pregnancy and lactation may reduce risk of eczema. 44 cases per 1,000; 95% CI 20–64), and 6 trials, suggest that fish oil supplementation during pregnancy and lactation may reduce risk of allergic sensitization to egg. GRADE certainty of these findings was moderate. 
    The team found less evidence, and low GRADE certainty, for claims that breastfeeding reduces eczema risk during infancy, that longer exclusive breastfeeding is associated with reduced type 1 diabetes mellitus, and that probiotics reduce risk of infants developing allergies to cow’s milk. 
    They found no evidence that dietary exposure to other factors, including prebiotic supplements, maternal allergenic food avoidance, and vitamin, mineral, fruit, and vegetable intake, influence risk of allergic or autoimmune disease. 
    Overall, the team’s findings support a connection between the mother’s diet and risk of immune-mediated diseases in the child. Maternal probiotic and fish oil supplementation may reduce risk of eczema and allergic sensitization to food, respectively.
    Stay tuned for more on diet during pregnancy and its role in celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS Med. 2018 Feb; 15(2): e1002507. doi:  10.1371/journal.pmed.1002507

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/17/2018 - What can fat soluble vitamin levels in newly diagnosed children tell us about celiac disease? A team of researchers recently assessed fat soluble vitamin levels in children diagnosed with newly celiac disease to determine whether vitamin levels needed to be assessed routinely in these patients during diagnosis.
    The researchers evaluated the symptoms of celiac patients in a newly diagnosed pediatric group and evaluated their fat soluble vitamin levels and intestinal biopsies, and then compared their vitamin levels with those of a healthy control group.
    The research team included Yavuz Tokgöz, Semiha Terlemez and Aslıhan Karul. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, the Department of Pediatrics, and the Department of Biochemistry at Adnan Menderes University Medical Faculty in Aydın, Turkey.
    The team evaluated 27 female, 25 male celiac patients, and an evenly divided group of 50 healthy control subjects. Patients averaged 9 years, and weighed 16.2 kg. The most common symptom in celiac patients was growth retardation, which was seen in 61.5%, with  abdominal pain next at 51.9%, and diarrhea, seen in 11.5%. Histological examination showed nearly half of the patients at grade Marsh 3B. 
    Vitamin A and vitamin D levels for celiac patients were significantly lower than the control group. Vitamin A and vitamin D deficiencies were significantly more common compared to healthy subjects. Nearly all of the celiac patients showed vitamin D insufficiency, while nearly 62% showed vitamin D deficiency. Nearly 33% of celiac patients showed vitamin A deficiency. 
    The team saw no deficiencies in vitamin E or vitamin K1 among celiac patients. In the healthy control group, vitamin D deficiency was seen in 2 (4%) patients, vitamin D insufficiency was determined in 9 (18%) patients. The team found normal levels of all other vitamins in the healthy group.
    Children with newly diagnosed celiac disease showed significantly reduced levels of vitamin D and A. The team recommends screening of vitamin A and D levels during diagnosis of these patients.
    Source:
    BMC Pediatrics

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/16/2018 - Did weak public oversight leave Arizonans ripe for Theranos’ faulty blood tests scam? Scandal-plagued blood-testing company Theranos deceived Arizona officials and patients by selling unproven, unreliable products that produced faulty medical results, according to a new book by Wall Street Journal reporter, whose in-depth, comprehensive investigation of the company uncovered deceit, abuse, and potential fraud.
    Moreover, Arizona government officials facilitated the deception by providing weak regulatory oversight that essentially left patients as guinea pigs, said the book’s author, investigative reporter John Carreyrou. 
    In the newly released "Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup," Carreyrou documents how Theranos and its upstart founder, Elizabeth Holmes, used overblown marketing claims and questionable sales tactics to push faulty products that resulted in consistently faulty blood tests results. Flawed results included tests for celiac disease and numerous other serious, and potentially life-threatening, conditions.
    According to Carreyrou, Theranos’ lies and deceit made Arizonans into guinea pigs in what amounted to a "big, unauthorized medical experiment.” Even though founder Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos duped numerous people, including seemingly savvy investors, Carreyrou points out that there were public facts available to elected officials back then, like a complete lack of clinical data on the company's testing and no approvals from the Food and Drug Administration for any of its tests.
    SEC recently charged the now disgraced Holmes with what it called a 'years-long fraud.’ The company’s value has plummeted, and it is now nearly worthless, and facing dozens, and possibly hundreds of lawsuits from angry investors. Meantime, Theranos will pay Arizona consumers $4.65 million under a consumer-fraud settlement Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich negotiated with the embattled blood-testing company.
    Both investors and Arizona officials, “could have picked up on those things or asked more questions or kicked the tires more," Carreyrou said. Unlike other states, such as New York, Arizona lacks robust laboratory oversight that would likely have prevented Theranos from operating in those places, he added.
    Stay tuned for more new on how the Theranos fraud story plays out.
    Read more at azcentral.com.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/14/2018 - If you’re looking for a simple, nutritious and exciting alternative to standard spaghetti and tomato sauce, look no further than this delicious version that blends ripe plum tomatoes, garlic, olive oil, basil, and firm sliced ricotta to deliver a tasty, memorable dish.
    Ingredients:
    12 ounces gluten-free spaghetti 5 or 6 ripe plum tomatoes ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil 2 cloves garlic, crushed ¾ teaspoons crushed red pepper ¼ cup chopped fresh basil 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley Kosher salt and black pepper ⅓ cup pecorino Romano cheese, grated ½ cup firm ricotta, shaved with peeler Directions:
    Finely chop all but one of the tomatoes; transfer to large bowl with olive oil and ¼ teaspoon salt.
    Cook spaghetti until al dente or desired firmness, and drain, reserving ¼ cup cooking water. 
    Meanwhile, chop remaining tomato, and place in food processor along with garlic, red pepper, and ½ teaspoon salt; puree until smooth. 
    Gently stir mixture into the bowl of chopped tomatoes.
    Add cooked spaghetti, basil and parsley to a large bowl.
    Toss in tomato mixture, adding some reserved pasta water, if needed. 
    Spoon pasta into bowls and top with Romano cheese, as desired.