• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Celiac.com E-Newsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsCeliac.com E-Newsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Celiac Disease - Pregnancy
23 23

Discussions related to being pregnant with celiac disease.

718 topics in this forum

    • 1 reply
    • 1,466 views
  1. Ads by Google:
    Ads by Google:


    • 12 replies
    • 1,741 views
    • 2 replies
    • 1,680 views
    • 8 replies
    • 2,091 views
    • 3 replies
    • 1,659 views
  2. Ads by Google:


    • 4 replies
    • 1,161 views
    • 1 reply
    • 1,402 views
    • 6 replies
    • 1,185 views
    • 31 replies
    • 9,274 views
    • 8 replies
    • 4,571 views
    • 1 reply
    • 1,066 views
    • 1 reply
    • 921 views
    • 13 replies
    • 3,513 views
    • 2 replies
    • 978 views
    • 4 replies
    • 957 views
    • 2 replies
    • 1,147 views
    • 4 replies
    • 1,963 views
    • 5 replies
    • 2,138 views
    • 16 replies
    • 5,251 views
    • 10 replies
    • 4,403 views
    • 5 replies
    • 2,105 views
    • 0 replies
    • 1,931 views
    • 1 reply
    • 823 views
    • 0 replies
    • 837 views
    • 7 replies
    • 1,652 views
23 23
  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      107,378
    • Total Posts
      935,770
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      65,070
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    Catseyez
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • The full celiac panel includes: TTG IGA TTG IGG DGP IGA DGP IGG EMA IGA   You can either have a gastroenterologist order the full celiac panel plus whatever else they typically test for, or you can order your own test at a site like walkinlab.com. At walkinlab.com it's called the celiac comprehensive test and costs $298.00 (not covered by insurance). Then if any one test comes up high you can give it to your gastroenterologist so they can do an endoscopy. The blood draw is done at your nearest Labcorp. Personally I'd make an appointment at the gastro so they can order their other blood tests and just insist on the full celiac panel also. There's any number of things it could be, not just celiac. If you don't get diagnosed you probably won't stick with a 100 percent gluten free diet for the many months required to see if it works. Good luck in your search.
    • You could certainly try.  Just remember that, if the mix doesn't have xanthum gum, you may need a little.  
    • Maybe the 20 mg. was too strong for you and increasing symptoms?   I have a very low threshold for most meds, and do better on child sized doses.   If you tolerate the 10 mg., that may be the way to go just to get symptoms under control and get stabilized.  Or maybe 10 mg. every other day, if that works. I read that food intolerance symptoms can take 24 to 48 hours to show up.   Can you think of what you were eating in the week before all this started?   I have always used dairy to settle my stomach, so until I figured out the dairy intolerance I was using a small glass of warm milk whenever my stomach was upset.   It provided immediate relief, but caught up with me hours later.   It was kind of hard to believe that milk was the cause when it was so effective in immediate symptom management.    I had also increased chocolate, coffee, and peanut butter right around the same time.  They don't seem to be intolerances (or maybe they are in huge quantities!), but they were irritants, so I needed to avoid them to get things to settle down.  Now that I'm approaching the 3 month point and starting to do better, I have been able to drink coffee with soy milk to buffer, have a little chocolate, and sample some peanuts without much distress.  Perhaps the hardest part of all of this is the time it takes (why forever?!), and how limited one's diet must be for so long in order to stabilize.  I was so sick of eating the same thing for so many weeks, that I started dreading the next meal.  I agree that symptoms and recovery become a blur.  I started making notes on a calendar so I could be more objective and accurate in looking back to assess my symptoms, what I'd tried, and progress.  Otherwise, I just couldn't tell what really did and didn't work.   What seemed like a week ago was really 2 or 3 ... I know you know what I mean! Do follow up with your doctor as need be.  I find that GI docs aren't that helpful for this sort of thing as it's minor in the general scheme of GI things.  My PCP basically told me it was trial and error, as it's different for each one of us.  He could only guide me in meds.   
  • Upcoming Events