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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

ravenwoodglass

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About ravenwoodglass

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  1. Meds

    It works much better for me but everyone is different. I have a physical job and sometimes get lower back pain. A hot shower and an Aleve will usually relieve it. It's worth your giving it a try.
  2. I am so sorry you have been suffering so much for so long. Yes you do need to eating gluten for celiac related testing. There is a lot we have to do to be safe. While gluten free have you been using things like a seperate toaster, dedicated condiments, butters,jams etc? have you been baking with wheat flour for others? What is your diet typically like? I ask because your doctor is woefully ignorant of the diagnosis process for celiac so he may also not have told you what you need to do to be safe. The Newbie 101 thread at the top of the Coping section has a lot of info. I hope you get some answers soon. One more thing. Are you being woken up at night with D? That is a good sign that you don't have IBS. IBS D hits when folks are awake.
  3. Your doctor should have told you not to stop eating gluten until after your blood work. You need to go back on it for a bit if you have been gluten free for more than a week or two you should do a couple months back on gluten before having the blood drawn. It isn't unusual for celiac GI issues to not be a constant thing. At least in earlier stages. For many years I would get violent D only a couple times a week before the D became a daily and nightly occurance. Symptoms can hang on for a bit even after we are gluten free. Chances are good also that you haven't been as gluten free as you think you may be. Do read the Newbie 101 thread and ask any questions you need to ask while you wait out the time until blood work can be done.
  4. Yea. I hope she isn't like one of my blood and biopsy diagnosed relatives who then had a gene test that showed she didn't have one of those 2 most common genes. She was then told it was a misdiagnosis and went back to eating gluten. She is young so she could also be in what they call the 'Honeymoon' period that used to cause doctors to think celiac could be outgrown. In young adults it can seem celiac has resolved because the person can consume gluten for a time before the antibodies start causing symptoms again. Pure conjecture on my part.
  5. Meds

    I take Aleve or the generic that I get at Wegmans. I haven't had any issues with it and only need to take one for relief. I should note that it is not something I take on a daily basis. I usually only need it a couple times a month.
  6. Welcome. I remember that pain all too well. It is excrutiating. I haven't had it since I was diagnosed, thank goodness. Being woken in the night by abdominal pain can be a sign of glutening. My GI said that if he know that was happening I could have been diagnosed much sooner. I did tell him but he didn't listen. You say you had little symptoms prediagnosis but it isn't uncommon for symptoms to escalate with a glutening after we have been gluten free. The only suggestion I can give is to reaccess what you are eating and where. You mention being a med student. That can lead to very busy schedules and make it hard to eat as safely as we need to eat. What is your diet like? Do you eat at a school or hospital cafe frequently? Can you start to keep a food and symptom log? Since gluten reactions can be delayed it can be hard to pinpoint what has gotten us when we have been CC'd. This may not be celiac related but a diary and symptom log may help if it is gluten sneaking in.
  7. New to all of this

    Welcome to the board. Many of us keep safe gluten free snacks on hand for times when we are away from home. In addition to what Karen mentioned fruits, nuts, hard boiled eggs etc. If it is a long trip a cooler can keep stuff fresh for you and they make ones that you can plug into your car. How were you diagnosed? Many folks carry the genes but don't develop celiac. You should have had a celiac panel blood test and an endoscopy. If you are new to the lifestyle then do check out the Newbie 101 threead at the top of the Coping section. it has a lot of info to keep you safe.
  8. Interesting article. I do wonder how she was 'misdiagnosed' though and how she came to the conclusion she wasn't celiac.
  9. Desperate for help

    Try dropping the oats for while and see if that helps. Some of us, myself included, react to even the ones that are certified as gluten free.
  10. Kefir – suspicious ingredients

    When items have multiple ingredients it can be hard to tell to which we are reacting. That gluten reactions can be delayed can also make it difficult and at times confusing. I would have random reactions at first and keeping a food and symptom diary helped a great deal. For myself the common item was soy but it took a few weeks to realize that was what was making me ill and I never would have been able to pinpoint it without the diary. I know this wasn't very helpful but I hope you are feeling much better soon.
  11. Desperate for help

    So sorry you are going through this set back. You say you are getting glutened from random uncontrollable cross contamination. What are the things that you think you are getting CC from? Are you consuming oats? If so you may want to drop those for a bit. Are you drinking distilled gluten grain alcohols (safe for most but some of us will react) or some of the gluten removed beers? Some of us are sensitive to those. Do you have a significant other who is a gluten eater? If you are then do be aware they need to brush teeth before you can kiss. If you can tell us a bit more about what you think is getting you and what you are eating on a regular basis we may be able to help you find ways to avoid CC. Have you had a repeat blood panel to see if your antibodies are down? If not it would be a good idea.
  12. Good to hear you tapered with your doctors assistance. Many drugs are very dangerous to stop suddenly and not just in terms of the withdrawl. I tapered off all meds also at diagnosis and have only had to add back in my 'as needed' Alprazolam. I take that for something not celiac related though. Things can be up and down for a bit when we go gluten free. Hang in there.
  13. I can definately identify with this. I half-laughingly refer to myself as an 'elder orphan'. I can't afford anything like a secret santa but would love the opportunity to exchange holiday cards with others here. It is comforting in a way to realize that I am not the only person who is isolated but kind of sad to know that there are others in the same boat. When I talk to folks with large close extened families who endlessly complain about them I just want to slap them sometimes.
  14. I agree that you should keep eating gluten and get tested if you can. The reason for the increase in symptoms after being gluten free is the antibodies flaring in response to you injesting what your body doesn't want you to consuming. Your body is letting you know in no uncertain terms that gluten is not something it wants. You don't have to consume a lot of gluten for testing. A couple slices of bread worth is enough. There is a chance with most of your issues sounding like they are neuro related for a false negative. After testing you should IMHO go back to being strictly gluten free no matter what the results. Keep in mind that many doctors consider celiac to be a solely GI problem and won't test if you don't have gastro issues. Sounds like your body is giving you the answer but a formal diagnosis can be helpful with family members and freinds taking the condition as seriously as you need to take it.
  15. It sounds like you have a good doctor. Do be sure to keep eating gluten until the blood work is drawn and then you can go gluten free. Do be sure to read the Newbie 101 thread to learn all you need to do to be safe.