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GFinDC

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GFinDC last won the day on January 11

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About GFinDC

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    A little farting never hurt anybody... :-).
  • Birthday 12/26/1957

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    http://www.paulsart.net/
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    Painting drawing art!
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    Amesville, Ohio USA

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  1. Beans no likea me! The only ones that don't bother me a lot are the Bushes baked beans in can. I guess it has something to do with how long they are cooked, but they seem easier to digest.
  2. Hi shollie, It's a good idea to find a doctor who us familiar with celiac diagnosis. You can try searching for a local celiac support group in your area. They might have recommendations for good doctors.
  3. You might be thinking of soy sauce? Soy sauce often has wheat in it. There are some gluten-free versions of soy sauce though. Unfortunately the evil soy has invaded our planet. Soy is one of the top 8 allergens in the USA. So there are a lot of people who have reactions to it. But for most of us it is not a gluten issue, unless they are eating soy sauce. Then watch out!
  4. Hi Roxy, Ceramic should be fine, as long as it is cleaned well. Welcome to the forum!
  5. That article had some good suggestions. Water/moisture is probably the problem. You could try a dehumidifier to remove some of the moisture in the air. Dehumidifiers can be a maintenance issue though as they have containers that fill with water and have to be emptied somehow. Another thing that might help is a black light. Black light inhibits mold growth. You would want to always turn the black light off when entering the area though, as it can be bad for your skin/eyes. A building I visited once had a giant indoor pool. They had network equipment in small rooms. They set up a timer to run a black light in the network rooms for 5 minutes every 15 minutes or so. Had a light switch with an indicator light on the outside so you knew if the black light was running. Just flip the switch off and it was safe to enter. The black light kept mold from growing in the network rooms.
  6. Hi again WW, Your kids should be tested for celiac disease also. There are a couple of genes associated with celiac and the may have inherited them. If you have brothers or sisters the also have a chance of developing celiac disease if they have the gene/s. Having the genes doesn't mean you automatically get celiac disease, but that you have the possibility of developing it. There are celiac disease support groups in many areas. You might find one by Googling your city name and celiac disease. Some hospitals have support groups or let support groups meet in their facilities.
  7. Hi Weekend, Such a big diet change can be bit daunting at first. But in time you will get used to the changes and adapt. It's best IMHO to stick with simple, whole foods for the first few months at least. You need to avoid all gluten and that is easier if you aren't eating any processed foods. You can always add those processed foods back into your diet after you have been gluten-free for 6 months or so and recovered some. A problem with many gluten-free processed food products is they have no added vitamins and contain more sugar and empty calories than regular gluten foods. Avoiding lots of carbs and sugar is good because it prevents bad bacteria from going crazy in your gut. Pro-biotics are good thing to add to your daily vitamins. So stick with whole foods, eat simple meals, avoid any restaurants and eating at friends for a while. You may be low on some vitamins so your doctor should check that if they haven't already. Recovery time varies but it could be up to a year or more for your gut to recover and heal. Celiac is an immune reaction it takes very little gluten to make the immune system fire up and attack our guts. And the immune attack can take weeks or months to subside. That's why it is important to be extra careful at first so your system can heal. Welcome to the forum Weekend!
  8. No need, I moved the thread for you.
  9. Hi Shollie, You might get more help if you post in the Dermatitis Herpetiformis section of the forum. https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/forum/26-dermatitis-herpetiformis/ You can also report the thread and ask a mod to move it to the DH subsection if you'd like.
  10. Hi Shanti, You could try some Milk of Magnesia to help move things out. I think eating more rather than less is helpful. If you have lots of gluten free food in your gut it can kind of thin-out the gluteney stuff in theory. The last thing you want is to not eat and have all that gluten hanging out in your gut. Pepto can help coat the gut and hopefully reduce irritation. But it is something you would have to take every few hours to feel and effect. Pepto has aspirin in it so don't exceed the recommended dosage. Peppermint tea may help too.
  11. I ate dairy with no problem for decades CL. It wasn't until I developed celiac disease that I started having problems with dairy. So, yeah it is somehow related. I think it is just an additional food intolerance like any others that people can develop when they get celiac disease. Dairy causes me pain and bleeding. Not just the typical lactose intolerance symptoms.
  12. I avoid all dairy. It is certainly possible to develop an immune response to any protein, including casein. Usually though people new to the gluten-free diet are advised to avoid dairy because of the lactose intolerance that can happen in celiac disease.
  13. I don't remember if I told you about my sisters rib problem. She had a rib pop out of joint. It caused her pain for a long time. She made several trips to chiropractors and eventually found one who popped the rib back in place. Boom! Problem solved! She wasn't doing anything particularly strenuous when the rib popped out of joint either. It really helped because now I don't feel as guilty when she has to carry the firewood in from the shed... Just kidding!
  14. Hi William, Does she have an IgE type immune reaction or an IgG type immune reaction (food intolerance)? There is a big difference between them. IgE immune reactions can cause anaphylaxis, which is the big danger in them. IgG immune reactions don't have that danger. There is some testing for IgG type reactions that is not reliable, like fecal testing. It can show positives on many foods that really don't cause any issue to the person. Alternative health people sometimes promote these tests as valid reasons to avoid foods, but they aren't. They do make money for those alt health people though. I have reactions to several of her list, including gluten, dairy, soy, but also nightshades, (tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, eggplant etc.), celery, and carrots. All these will cause me symptoms but they aren't deadly, just unpleasant. You may have to make your own flours to get a bread type thing going. If you have a grinder you can experiment with making flours from any dried beans, millet, amaranth, or peas at the grocery store etc. Also Bob's Red Mill sells bean flours and coconut flours etc. BRM flours are available in many areas. Often gluten-free flour blends contain several different types of flour and a gluten substitute, like xanthan gum. Xanthan gum is made from bacteria growing on corn though, so it might be a problem. There are also bean gums available. If she has celiac disease, it might be better to keep her off carbs and sugars for a while though. Carbs and sugars can feed bad bacteria in the gut and cause many symptoms by themselves. Reducing the bad bacteria's food source plus adding in some pro-biotics may help. Welcome to the forum William!