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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

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  2. Adults who have gluten sensitivities cohabitating with non-gluten sensitive adults may have a lot of unanswered questions that need to be asked. Dramatic changes in one family member's diet can have profound effects on a household (Bacigalupe & Plocha, 2015). Numerous studies document how parents and children handle everyday living when the child has food intolerances, but very few studies focus on adults living with food sensitivities. Wouldn't you like to know how other adults with food sensitivities adapt and manage over the long haul? View the full article
  3. Despite sticking to a gluten-free diet, some celiac patients endure persistent duodenal damage; a condition associated with adverse outcomes. A team of researchers recently set out to determine the prevalence and clinical risk factors for persistent villus atrophy among symptomatic celiac disease patients. The team conducted a nested cross-sectional analysis on coeliac disease patients with self-reported moderate or severe symptoms, who were all following a gluten-free diet, and who underwent protocol-mandated duodenal biopsy upon enrollment in the CeliAction clinical trial. View the full article
  4. More people than ever are following a gluten-free diet, but does the diet carry health risks that could cause harm in the long run? That's a very possible scenario, according to a report published in the journal Epidemiology. The report presents strong data to suggest that numerous gluten-free food staples contain high levels of toxic metals, which means that many gluten-free eaters could face higher risks for cancer and other chronic illnesses. View the full article
  5. ... information on diabetes and celiac disease and the Canadian Celiac association will provide information on celiac disease and the gluten free diet. View the full article
  6. A strict gluten-free diet is necessary for celiac disease and gluten intolerance patients. However, cross-contamination is a frequent problem in many ... View the full article
  7. Chicken Cordon Bleu is one of those time-honored recipes that live in nearly every great cook's repetoire. This recipe uses oatmeal and amaranth to create a lovely breading for chicken breasts stuffed with ham and cheese. They are low calorie, reasonably healthy, and certainly delicious. View the full article
  8. If you have celiac disease or non-celiac gluten intolerance, it would be a dream come true if, instead of following a strict gluten-free diet, you could ... View the full article
  9. There are some very serious reasons why one would follow a gluten-free diet, specifically celiac disease. This autoimmune condition can wreak havoc ... View the full article
  10. Some individuals have severe reactions to gluten, including those with Celiac Disease. Gluten-free crusts are often hard to incorporate into restaurant ... View the full article
  11. You can also use leftover bones from other recipes to make the broth. The following tips will help you make a gluten-free broth that is safe for celiac disease. View the full article
  12. Even though gluten-free diets are more popular than ever, researchers still don’t have much good data on gluten intake and long-term health. A team of researchers recently set out to assess three large cohort studies, the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS, n=69,276), the NHSII (n=88,610), and the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS, n=41,908), and to estimate gluten intake using a validated food-frequency questionnaire collected every 2-4 years. The team defined incidental T2D as physician diagnosed diabetes, and confirmed with supplementary information. View the full article
  13. Therefore, the brand does not recommend its Gluten-Free Crust made with Ancient Grains for customers with Celiac Disease or serious gluten ... View the full article
  14. Papa John's Gluten-Free Crust is made with Ancient Grains, specifically ... Grains for customers with Celiac Disease or serious gluten intolerances. View the full article
  15. Is a reovirus infection a prime cause of celiac disease? Researchers have suspected that viral infections may play a major role in celiac disease by  causing a pathological responses that triggers T helper 1 (TH1) immunity against dietary gluten. A team of researchers recently set out to test this hypothesis and to gain insights into mechanisms underlying virus-induced loss of tolerance to dietary antigens. To do so, they developed a viral infection model that makes use of two reovirus strains that infect the intestine, but which differ in their immunopathological outcomes. View the full article