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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

plumbago

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plumbago last won the day on November 8 2015

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About plumbago

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    Post Nov 8, 2016: ACA, What now?, health, mental health, gardening, organic, recycling, better labeling of GF foods
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  1. Most physicians follow the joint commission’s guidelines on prescribing HTN medications which usually begin with a diuretic and calcium channel blocker (the amlodipine) - see below. Is it possible that your bp was still not controlled on the CCB (amlodipine)? So the ARB was added? Again, I’d just like to say that just bc a drug does have certain adverse effects does not mean you will have them, but I understand if you would not even want to take the chance, given a previous history of celiac disease. http://www.aafp.org/afp/2014/1001/p503.html “In the general nonblack population, including those with diabetes, initial anti-hypertensive treatment should include a thiazide diuretic, calcium channel blocker, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB). In the general black population, including those with diabetes, initial treatment should include a thiazide diuretic or calcium channel blocker. If the target blood pressure is not reached within one month after initiating therapy, the dosage of the initial medication should be increased or a second medication should be added (thiazide diuretic, calcium channel blocker, ACE inhibitor, or ARB; do not combine an ACE inhibitor with an ARB). Blood pressure should be monitored and the treatment regimen adjusted until the target blood pressure is reached. A third drug should be added if necessary; however, if the target blood pressure cannot be achieved using only the drug classes listed above, antihypertensive drugs from other classes can be used (e.g., beta blockers, aldosterone antagonists). Referral to a physician with expertise in treating hypertension may be necessary for patients who do not reach the target blood pressure using these strategies.” Drugs for BP in different classes work by different mechanisms. It may be worth it to print out those huge, long drug information sheets and go over them with a fine toothed comb. As for CoQ10, have you checked for coupons online? Can your doctor write you an Rx and get your insurance to pay? They might say it’s on OTC and you have to pay out of pocket, but it may be worth it to find a way around that - would a prior authorization do the trick? I don’t know, just bringing up the questions. In the report you cited, these concluding words were to me, chilling: “Therefore, we suggest the possibility of a class effect.” Losartan, olmeseartan - doesn’t matter. And I'll say it again, there must be a way to disseminate this information more widely as I had no idea about this adverse effect, and never heard any docs speaking about it either. It really warrants wider sharing. Finally, one person who is often an overlooked resource is your pharmacist. They have just tons of knowledge and should be able to talk to you in some depth if asked, in an articulate, easy to understand way. They may even be able to do some digging and research for you. Plumbago
  2. Hi Lindsey Anne -- This summer, I had sores on my tongue which were horrible. I wrote about it here: I haven't had any since July. Since June of this year, I haven't really had added sugar, and that has probably helped. I also changed toothpastes to ones that do not have SLS. Plumbago Cycling lady, do you mean a gluten containing diet?
  3. I think this is an interesting observation, and definitely worth exploring!
  4. Hello, Often drugs that end in –artan are ARBs, and they work by blocking the angiotensin receptors. I’m not sure what the exact difference is between the two medications you mention, though. Have you called the manufacturer of losartan to see if any of the fillers contain gluten? It might be a good idea to know what those fillers are. In my drug book “dyspepsia” and “gastritis” are mentioned as side effects, but they did not drill down to the specificity of villous blunting. I did some googling, and in addition to what Knitty found, I came across this: Small Bowel Histopathologic Findings Suggestive of Celiac Disease in an Asymptomatic Patient Receiving Olmesartan “Although Rubio-Tapia et al are careful to avoid claiming a proven causal relationship between olmesartan therapy and the observed spruelike enteropathy, the data are highly suggestive of more than just a coincidental association. “They further suggest that a potential mechanism for the enteropathy could relate to inhibitory effects of angiotensin II receptor antagonists on transforming growth factor β action because transforming growth factor β is important in gut immune homeostasis. “Although anecdotal, these observations lead to the hypothesis that olmesartan, and perhaps other angiotensin II receptor antagonists, could be a cause of intraepithelial lymphocytosis in architecturally preserved proximal small intestinal mucosa.” (One of the patients in question was offered the opportunity to do a gluten-free diet, but he/she declined.) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3547582/ So, it looks like you are definitely on to something, and if this turns out to be a “thing,” would probably warrant dissemination on a wider scale. You didn't mention what your BP is with the medication or was without it, but please let your health care provider know if you do decide to discontinue your blood pressure medication. It's often recommended not to DQ suddenly, which can cause the BP to spike in some cases. Plumbago ETA: Just because a drug can cause a particular side effect does not mean it does in your case. I just thought I'd add that, but nevertheless totally and completely understand the cause of concern in any case.
  5. I suggested a urinalysis to see if you had proteinuria, which is something that can happen with certain rheumatoid conditions. But you say you’ve had two ANAs - assuming those came back normal? I really like the suggestion of a food diary and going low carb, especially as raised glucose consumption can lead to a positive methane breath test. You may have a food allergy and/or are producing a lot of mucus in reaction to something, which can make breathing more difficult esp if you have a deviated septum. I have now jacked my b12 way up and feel better, and I’m also consuming more iron-rich foods. Both of which in general help me feel less run down. You mentioned having very low BP in the middle of the night - have you measured it? What was it, if so? I wish I could be of more help. Plumbago
  6. Oh how awful, and it sounds like there may be a CQ deficit among your medical helpers!, CQ being curiosity quotient. But maybe they’re researching it. It’s very difficult for me, too, to understand when I’ve been glutened – to narrow down the culprit, or even if there is a culprit. I haven’t heard of rectal pain, but that shouldn’t mean too much, as I don’t have a lot of experience with other people’s celiac disease, just my own. (Also, you say it’s abdominal but then say rectum, so I was a little confused.) The only things I could think of as possibilities were: Ovarian cysts, UC, diverticuli, the IUD, referred pain, a cut in the anus (perianal abscess), or hemorrhoids. A quick google of women using IUDs did bring up similar experiences as yours, most often of which was attributed to nerve pain, and in one case a wandering IUD, but most likely you know yours is still there. In a comment, someone suggested the vagus nerve was to blame, but I don’t think the vagus enervates the rectum, but I’m not 100% on that. It would be helpful to know if you are having other symptoms. Personally, and hopefully this is not tmi, but I get a left-sided lower abdominal pain/cramp occasionally (now about once a month) when I need to have a BM. Though I’m not certain what’s causing it, I tend to think it is a diverticuli. Lastly, and you knew someone would say it, could it possibly be stress-related? Plumbago
  7. What was your gluten free diet like? I wonder if, when you were gluten-free, you went more whole food, less processed food? Or did you continue to eat processed food that was just gluten free? One reason I ask is that I have cut way back on grains and processed foods like gluten-free bread, but occasionally allow myself a treat which is a gluten-free biscuit southern-style from the gluten-free bakery nearby. There is no better sleeping pill in the world! I am knocked out. I’m not saying you’re not Celiac, I’m just curious what your diet was replaced with. You’re definitely reacting to something, and in a way you’re lucky to know what that is! Plumbago
  8. Hi, I’m sorry you’re not feeling well and sympathize with the lack of answers. It’s not usually normal to have reduced WBC, no. If I had reduced WBC I would want to make sure it’s not a rheumatoid autoimmune condition, so I might get an ANA and a urinalysis. Are you taking any medications? Do you have a rash? Family history of autoimmunity? On the other hand, the joint pain - how active are you every day? With me, though I am older, I find that if I don’t use my muscles, I will feel pain eventually. I know we tend to report what we’ve been eating on these boards, but I also think how much we move is important. I guess I would be most concerned about the WBC and the shortness of breath. The SOB could be anxiety, but the anxiety could be physiologically based. Or it could be something else. Is there a breakdown of your white blood cells by type? Plumbago
  9. Yes, elevated intra-epithelial lymphocytosis is a possible indication of Celiac disease. That’s what my biopsy said. “Moderate to marked villous blunting with moderate to marked intra-epithelial lymphocytosis and marked chronic inflammation of lamina propia….characteristic for untreated celiac…” What we are finding out about these medicines is incredible. I knew that it could damage the kidneys, and can cause fluid retention. It’s good you posted here. Yes, usually the order is indeed blood tests first then biopsy, but oh well. My own thinking about autoimmunity is starting to evolve more and more to incorporate the ideas of Dr Terry Wahls, namely that there is little real difference between the various chronic diseases, that at bottom, it all comes down to cellular health. "Cells need certain nutrients in order to do their work, otherwise they begin to malfunction, even die." “When you look at chronic disease on a cellular and molecular level, we see it’s all the same disease – too much oxidative stress, inflammation, and nutrient deficiencies, toxins that are present. We see it in mental health, neurodegeneration, autoimmunity. It’s remarkably similar. Treat at the cellular level.” Dr Terry Wahls. Plumbago
  10. Hi GF2011, Do you know if you have hypertension? Or diabetes? “Normal male sexual function requires a complex interaction of vascular, neurological, hormonal, and psychological systems…Nitric oxide plays a significant role, and … loss of erection … occurs when nitric oxide-induced vasodilation ceases….Low NO levels are found in people with diabetes, smokers, and men with T deficiency.” Causes can be “decreased blood flow and inadequate intracavernosal oxygen levels when atherosclerosis involves the hypogastric artery or other feeder vessels…” Source: Diabetes and Erectile Dysfunction by Chu and Edelman. They also recommend: “Initial labs should include HbA1c, free testosterone, thyroid, and prolactin levels.” Terry Wahls, MD implicates general inflammation “with leaky blood vessels, the immune cells may burrow into the walls, deposit cholesterol and inflammation molecules into the blood vessels, and clog and narrow veins and arteries. Leaky gut is not just about the GI; it happens largely because of our processed grain-based diets.” Pretty general, I realize, and as far as I know she doesn't mention ED specifically (but does note the overall sperm count of males has been dropping worldwide).
  11. Ok, thanks. I suppose those are available in the grocery stores, but it's been harder and harder to find lasagna noodles, no boil or not...
  12. Last time I needed no boil lasagna noodles, I could not find them in any of the grocery stores, so I had to purchase them from Amazon. When they arrived, no surprise, the noodles were all broken up into fragments. I used to buy these at Whole Foods, wonder why I couldn't find them at the two WF I searched here. Anyone know if Trader Joes sells them? Plumbago
  13. By coincidence, today I read in Mind Over Meds by Andrew Weil that high intensity exercise can increase the incidence of colds (and flu). He did not explain the mechanism, but it seems during high impact exercise, natural killer cell activity (which keeps cold and flu in check) decreases. I read elsewhere that in general, the immune system is suppressed during higher intensity exercise (adrenaline and cortisol are higher). Moderate exercise is what, I've read, really enhances immunity. Still, it doesn't seem that you are close to overdoing it, so I'm not sure what's going on. Most of what I've read that implicates high intensity exercise mentions things like marathons or marathon training.
  14. It was a link (I believe) from Southern Illinois University which is unfortunately no longer active. This was the link. http://www.cehs.siu.edu/fix/medmicro/igs.htm In addition, there’s a book I frequently refer to Recognizing Celiac Disease by a doctor and a nurse. There are other books, one by Dr Peter Greene, which I’ve referred to in the past. Basically, I compiled a table (trying to post below:)) which is material most likely gathered from several different sources, including, by the way, this site. There are people on here who are much more knowledgeable than I am about the tests. tTG-IgA Tissue Transglutaminase Immunoglobulin A Self The enzyme TTG deamidates gliadin (a broken-down component of gluten). In reaction to the presence of TTG, the antibody immunoglobulin A (IgA) is produced. Raised IgA antibodies indicate short-term immune response, indicating ingestion of gluten 2-4 weeks preceding the test. Not 100% specific: there are other causes of a positive test, including diabetes, heart failure, Crohn’s and others. Also, people who have celiac disease can get a negative result with this test. Machine-read. tTG-IgG Tissue Transglutaminase Immunoglobulin G Self In reaction to TTG, IgG is produced. Raised IgG antibodies demonstrate long-term immune response, indicating ingestion of gluten from 3-6 months, sometimes up to a year, preceding test. Valuable in diagnosing Celiac in patients with selective IgA deficiency. DGP-IgG Deamidated Gliadin Peptide Immunoglobulin G Newer, excellent test that detects an immune response to a very specific fragment of the gluten molecule (gliadin peptide). If both DGP are high, celiac disease almost certain. Accurate for detecting gut damage of celiac disease, so good it is likely to make endoscopy redundant. Does not replace the IgG-gliadin test. DGP-IgA Deamidated Gliadin Peptide Immunoglobulin A (ELISA) measures antibodies directed against deamidated Gliadin peptides (DGP) in human serum or plasma. AGA-IgG Anti-Gliadin Antibody Immunoglobulin G Anti-self (Older gliadin test.) The antibody immunoglobulin G (IgG) is produced in response to gliadin. Raised IgG antibodies demonstrate long-term immune response, indicating ingestion of gluten from three to six months, sometimes up to a year, preceding the test. Not specific & sensitive for Celiac, but accurate as an inexpensive test for evidence of a gluten reaction AGA-IgA Antigliadin Antibody Immunoglobulin A Anti-self The antibody immunoglobulin A (IgA) is produced in response to gliadin. Raised IgA antibodies indicate short-term immune response, indicating ingestion of gluten 2-4 weeks preceding the test. Not specific & sensitive for Celiac, but accurate as an inexpensive test for evidence of a gluten reaction Total IgA Immunoglobulin A Self The celiac blood test panel includes the total serum IgA test because some people (3%) are IgA-deficient. If you have a very low total serum IgA, that can invalidate the three blood tests that rely on your IgA levels. People with celiac disease suffer from low total IgA levels about 10 to 15 times more frequently than people in the general population. EMA IgA Anti-endomysial antibody IgA Self EMA stands for antiendomysial antibodies, which are antibodies produced by the body that attack the body's own tissue. When the EMA-IgA is positive, the patient almost certainly has celiac disease. However, the test also can produce false negative results in patients with celiac disease but only partial villous atrophy. Highly specific (>95%), and >90% sensitive. The EMA antibodies correlate to degree of villous atrophy. Observer-dependent.
  15. Only for some tests. You had several. Tissue Transglutaminase Immunoglobulin G In reaction to TTG, IgG is produced. Raised IgG antibodies demonstrate long-term immune response, indicating ingestion of gluten from 3-6 months, sometimes up to a year, preceding test. Tissue Transglutaminase Immunoglobulin A The enzyme TTG deamidates gliadin (a broken-down component of gluten). In reaction to the presence of TTG, the antibody immunoglobulin A (IgA) is produced. Raised IgA antibodies indicate short-term immune response, indicating ingestion of gluten 2-4 weeks preceding the test. Plumbago