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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Jmg

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  1. Yes the first has wheat gluten in the ingredients, the second via the wheat flour. Here in the UK manufacturers HAVE to highlight gluten sources. Check the ingredients and if WHEAT, BARLEY, or RYE are mentioned *usually highlighted, italicised or underlined, then you will know there's gluten. Most of iceland's processed foods will probably be gluten filled to be honest. Any breadcrumbed or battered foods for instance. Ps, you and me both have another disease, the british one of apologising You don't need to, you're very welcome here and all of your questions are valid and understandable. It's going to get better
  2. Hi Allie and welcome First off, I know 3 years was a long wait, but at 17 you've figured out celiac way before many people do. That should make a big impact on minimising its effects and helping you with the diet, so, bizarrely enough, congratulations! A lot of good advice has been brought together in this thread: Don't worry that your symptoms are bad now. As you follow the diet your body will begin healing itself and you're still very young so hopefully this will go really smoothly. Think in terms of the next 6 months rather than weeks however, recovery will likely take a little time. Eat as healthily as you can, lots of whole foods and try to avoid the gluten free processed substitutes as your digestive system needs all the help it can get at this moment. You may want to avoid dairy as well for now and think about reintroducing it later. This site has been really helpful to me and others. I hope you find it just as useful. Best of luck! ps, your increased reaction to gluten during the challenge phase was perfectly normal. Many find that reintroducing it much worse than the initial affects and take some time to get over the challenge. That's why you'll see lots of posts here urging folks to 'stay on gluten' till their testing is complete! PPS( ) Inasmuch as your post can convey emotion, your's seemed positive Stay that way! At times the diet can be a bit isolating and some friends and family may struggle to understand. I'm sure it will be difficult at times making good choices and staying vigilant when everyone around you doesn't have to think twice. Stick with it, your health is paramount and it will be worthwhile. In time your good friends will get it and those that don't aren't worth worrying about. There are great foods you can eat and if not, learn to cook them yourself
  3. I wanted to collect some of the info on NCGI in one place so that visitors who test negative but may still have an issue with gluten can be directed there. I'll add to this post as I find new links, but feel free to add or contribute anything you think may be of use! Matt --- Useful links: An overview from Alessio Fasano, one of the world's leading researchers on celiac and gluten sensitivity: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VvfTV57iPUY Umberto Volta, another leading researcher in the field gives some of the latest findings about NCGI: Presentation slides from Dr Volta's visit to Coeliac UK - NCGS about halfway through A scholarly overview from celiac disease magazine: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Knut_Lundin/publication/232528784_Non-celiac_Gluten_Sensitivity/links/09e415098bbe37c05b000000.pdf A good overview from a sceptical but fair perspective: https://sciencebasedmedicine.org/a-balanced-look-at-gluten-sensitivity/ Another overview: https://celiac.org/celiac-disease/understanding-celiac-disease-2/non-celiac-gluten-sensitivity-2/ University of Chicago's excellent celiac site's take: http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/category/faq-non-celiac-gluten-sensitivity/ A compelling account in the British Medical Journal from an NCGI patient: http://www.bmj.com/content/345/bmj.e7982 Here's some positive news about a potential new test: http://www.medicaldaily.com/non-celiac-gluten-insensitivity-blood-test-392850 NCGI in children: NCGI and auto immune study: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26026392 Also consider: Fodmaps: http://www.kcl.ac.uk/lsm/research/divisions/dns/projects/fodmaps/faq.aspx This Monash study: http://fodmapmonash.blogspot.co.uk/2015/03/the-truth-behind-non-celiac-gluten.html suggested some who think they're reacting to gluten should actually be reducing fodmaps Sibo: http://www.webmd.boots.com/digestive-disorders/small-intestinal-bacteria-sibo
  4. That's a very normal reaction believe it or not. I would always tell someone to stay on gluten before testing is done because it's a lot easier staying on it than it is reintroducing it. I felt worse on my challenge than I had before giving it up the first time. Whilst a definite diagnosis is the aim of many (I tried myself) and has benefits in terms of health monitoring etc there is no treatment other than the gluten-free diet so if you get negative or inconclusive results and can't face the further challenge you could choose to forgo it and just go gluten free. Either way there will be plenty of support for you here. all the best.
  5. 7Hi jen and welcome No-one can diagnose remotely via nterwe posts but if there was such a game as celiac / gluten sensitive bingo, I would be calling 'House!' having read your account above... Lots of things fit the pattern as I'm sure your lurking has revealed. It's a tricky condition to diagnose however so you may have a little wait before you join the coolest club in town and get your funky celiac membership card For now it's really important that you stay on gluten. Keep eating it as accurate testing requires it. Ask your doctor to check the boxes for celiac testing alongside your liver blood tests. There should be enough in your history to get this without hassle but if they're reluctant INSIST and don't be afraid to assert your reasonable suspicion and wish to clarify and exclude. A good liver specialis will be aware of the possible links so you should be ok. If not gt second opinion. Ask for a full celiac panel as there are variety of tests. Find further info here There's a lot to take in, but be positive, I think you are on the right track and if so, you could soon be feeling better than you ever thought possible!
  6. and once that's happened if results are negative please do properly trial the gluten free diet regardless. So much of what you've posted suggests you're on the right track with this, results notwithstanding. Good luck!
  7. Thank you for posting this I've never been to South America, it's the only continent, bar the poles, I've yet to visit. It's really nice to read that my gluten sensitivity hasn't ruled it out. Maybe I'll get to the land of Luis Suarez yet!
  8. Obviously from the outside it's difficult to comment, but if I were you I'd leave allergies for now and pursue definitive celiac testing via your doctor and preferably a gastroenterologist. They're the first port of call for digestion issues. If you do wind up being celiac it's possible that other allergies or intolerances would resolve or improve in any case once you've been on the diet for awhile. That's been my experience. Ps note that wheat allergy is completely different and unrelated to celiac or non celiac gluten sensitivity.
  9. Thank you ps, it may be better if the thread title was changed as we now have two 'overwhelmed' topics. If it were 'Bile ducts and celiac?' then it may attract more users with direct experience?
  10. Hello and welcome Maybe? From reading others accounts there's a big variation in how quickly gluten antibodies respond to the gluten diet. I did similar to you and my doctor said that 1 week back on should be enough to show up in a test, but he didn't know what he was talking about sadly... The 2 week figure refers to the endoscopy, for blood testing 8-12 weeks on gluten is more normal. Basically if it comes back positive fine you have your answer. If its negative it may be a false negative due to your going gluten free beforehand. If you want to pursue a diagnosis then yes. Don't go off gluten again until you confirm that all testing is complete. Keep a journal noting any symptoms, that may be useful to you later. More info here: There's some good info in the site faq: https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/announcement/3-frequently-asked-questions-about-celiac-disease/ I know how you feel! Partway through my gluten challenge I knew that too results notwithstanding. Fwiw I think you've found your answer. Good luck!
  11. From what I've read 2 slices a day should be enough for the challenge. I think they'll have more gluten than the milky way's. Now I want a milky way Have one for me tomorrow dalek100!
  12. Hello and welcome I tried a little while ago to put the pros and cons of testing etc in a post. You can see what I came up with here: There's some good info in the site faq: https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/announcement/3-frequently-asked-questions-about-celiac-disease/ you may want to click the link on children's chances of inheriting it... You may also find this useful: http://www.parents.com/blogs/food-scoop/2015/03/27/diet/when-should-you-introduce-gluten-to-your-baby-well-it-depends/ I think you have good reasons to seek an answer out, but I'd suggest leaving any return to gluten until you're well past pregnancy! After cutting it out reintroduction can be pretty hard going and the last thing you need at the moment is additional stress. In the meantime you can be watchful for signs with your kids. Best of luck!
  13. I didn't read that far. Yikes... A hefty dose of perspective in that one. For anyone reading this is the post:
  14. Welcome too! Sorry to hear you're suffering now. If you can nail the diet you should improve. You should also think about vitamin supplements. There's a good chance that you're suffering from one or more deficiencies as a result of the affects of celiac on your intestine's capacity to draw nutrients from your food. A good multi vitamin is a must, just make sure its gluten free and see if your doctor can refer you to a dietician as Lochella's has.