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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Intestinal Biopsy Is Not Necessarily Required To Diagnose Celiac Disease - Celiac.com
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Celiac.com

Intestinal Biopsy is Not Necessarily Required to Diagnose Celiac Disease

Celiac.com

Celiac.com 02/18/2013 - Currently, there are two main diagnostic tools available to would-be celiacs: biopsy and serological (antibody) tests. For the past few decades, biopsy has been the only relatively reliable (and diagnostically accepted) path to ...

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    • That is some odd allergy testing.  I don't get the separating the dairy?  Are you supposed to be allergic to the protein in dairy?  Then  it would be for all dairy.   like Peter said, "malt" isn't a thing to be allergic to.  Usually, foods with " malt" say  " barley malt".  Like a malted milk ball has barley malt.  But your "allergy test" should say an allergy to barley not malt.     Sorry to say, I think you wasted your money on those " tests".  
    • I definitely went for the monster roller coaster ride myself.  I ended up doing elimination diets multiple times over the years to identify problem foods beyond gluten.  And yes, you are a bright and shiny newbie at 5 months!   Usually we think of children as healing faster than adults.  After all, they do other things faster than adults too, like running into walls, and pissing off parents. Remember you are trying to heal your gut, and that means giving it an easier job than normal to reduce irritation and the work of digestion.  Stopping the immune response is important, but healing the physical damage and also restoring a healthy gut flora is important too.  It's not a simple thing and the gotchas are many.  That's why a whole foods diet with no or very few processed foods is helpful, as it eliminates many sources of gluten contamination and also carbs and sugars that feed bad bacteria in the gut.  Healing the gut allows more minerals and vitamins to be absorbed which also aids the healing process. Five months was the very beginning of my healing journey.  YMMV, but mine was more on the order of 5 to 7 years, although some of my health issues weren't (I don't think) directly related to gluten.  I would guess I am on the slow side of things recovery wise.  But it did happen, just not as fast I would of liked. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/11/161107143029.htm Even after a year on a gluten-free diet, nearly 20 percent of children with celiac disease continue to have intestinal abnormalities (enteropathy) on repeat biopsies, reports a study in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, official journal of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.  
    • "Gluten-Free" is a regulated term in Canada and the USA. It refers to wheat, rye, and barely content.  It does not specifically refer to "malt" since, while most malt is from barley, other grains can be malted without resulting in gluten content. Your allergist is wrong if he says "malt" is an issue. Wheat is gluten; yoghurt is dairy; but "malt" is not specific. You may react to certain things when malted.  But it depends on what the malt is made from. If it says "gluten-free" it does not contain wheat, barley or rye. Other top allergens are are listed in FALCPA, which came into effect in 2006.
    • I have been gluten-free per doctor recommendation for 2 years now. Since I was still having stomach problems, I went in for allergy testing. It came back as: Highly reactive: wheat, malt, yogurt Moderately reactive: barley, cows milk, mushrooms, cottage cheese, mozzarella, kelp, sesame, ginger Mildly reactive: green beans, chicken, sunflower, cheddar cheese, safflower I have never gone through official celiac testing; I simply followed the doctor's orders to rid myself of gluten and see if it helped. It helped tremendously, but I still had stomach issues, unexplained fevers, and fatigue a couple of times a month. Thus the allergy testing. My question is, is everything labeled "gluten free" also malt and barley free? Are there hidden places I should be cautious of sesame, ginger, or the other allergens? I'm willing to eliminate anything...I just want to feel better consistently. Also, I have three kids who don't currently seem to have issues. How hereditary are these problems? 
    • I compost.  I never add any bread products (even gluten-free) to my bin.  Why?  Critters.  Yep, rats, raccoons, oppossums..... You can not get glutened from it, unless you eat or swallow it.  Just wash your veggies.  
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