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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes

Am I Just A Wuss? (Staying Home After Gluten/soy/whateverings)
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I hold no grudges against anyone because everyone has bad days.  I guess because I have done this so long and have healed well, I get short tempered with those who come across as if this is the worst thing that will ever happen to you and you never get well.  The road to wellness with celiac is a long one, there is no denying that. We have incompetent doctors to boot and that's why I stress the importance of self education because, right now, that is the only way to wellness for us.  And I know no one likes to be told they need to tighten up their diet but that is what it really takes.  But, I know you will get there eventually and look back and be happy you did because you won't want to end up like someone I know.

 

This really makes my blood boil but nothing I can do.  I have a friend who I KNOW is full blown celiac.  She is only in her late 40's and she is literally falling apart.  She went in for a third surgery this morning to have her back "fixed" with steel rods and mesh because her spine is disintegrating from RA.  The destruction is progressing rapidly.  She can barely walk she is in such pain. She is bloated and gaining weight, whereas not that long ago she was a gym bunny who was incredibly fit.  She admitted to me she has never had normal BM's...always D or C.

Her sister also has RA and Hashi's.  Then, recently she broke out with what I thought was DH but it turns out she was tested for that (after I told her what to do for testing) and the derm she saw diagnosed plaque psoriasis. She is covered in it and it won't go away.  Yet....not one of the doctors thinks she has celiac.  She was tested via blood work but was on strong immuno-suppresants at the time so I told her the testing was useless.  Doctors don't know this?  :huh:

 

She tried a gluten-free diet for what she claims was one month, although she really wasn't totally gluten-free.  When I told her how strict she had to be, her eyeballs spun.  She fought the whole idea all the way because, as she put it, she can't live without bread.  I don't remember that bread is off limits for us...we just need to eat different brands of bread and I know all the good ones.

Then that damn derm doctor told her she DOES NOT have celiac, based on the diagnosis of psoriasis.  So he hasn't heard that psoriasis can be caused by food issues....apparently they don't know that, even though we do.  This just makes me crazy.  The AMA are just killing people. So....I have to bite my tongue nearly off when I see her because she has closed her mind to celiac because the doctor said so.  Oh, yeah...and she loves going out to eat.  So that has won out over getting better.  She goes out at least 3 times a week so she couldn't have been gluten-free for that month.  :rolleyes:

 

Please don't let this happen to you!  Every time I see her I am reminded of the destruction that happens when you eat gluten or are not being careful enough. We can enjoy life and go out to eat....just not as often as the general public without celiac.  I want to see success stories, people!!!!!  :lol:

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Here I am!!!!  Was headed to a wheelchair (probably should have used one last year- I was just too stubborn to accept it from the doctor). 

 

The three years that followed my celiac diagnosis were worse than those before diagnosis -- was I frustrated - hell yes -- beyond belief, but I kept trying -- now I am skiing again -- I walk everyday -- sometimes twice and I am able to run a half mile or so.  Still struggling to get back on my bike because my wrists and shoulders are proving more stubborn than my hips, knees, ankles and toes in getting moving.-- but I will be riding again very soon.

 

Do I have rough days - sure.

 

Am I in pain every morning when I rise - yep

 

Does it suck that my diet is so strict -- not any more.  While I was still very sick I was having regular pity parties with me, myself and I -- now that I am up and running - LIVING a very full life for the first time in over a decade -- I can honestly say I would eat anything to stay this way....lucky for me I have loads of delicious foods :D

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The Lisa's of the world seem to do very well on this diet, don't thery?  :lol:   I feel better and am stronger now than I was in my 20's and that just boggles my mind. I wouldn't have believed I could feel this good after so many years of illness but it happened.  The hardest part is getting people to believe that wheat can do all this to people.  There has to be a better way to make them see the connection.

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I love hearing you ladies' success stories... it's heartening.  :)

 

It really is all about choices, isn't it? We choose how "tight" we keep our diet, or not. We choose whether eating out (beyond a basic salad) is worth the risk, or not.  I truely appreciate that about this disease, because with my other autoimmune problems I had/have very little control over how I can treat it... And that drives me nuts when I have a plan for how to treat myself but a doctor decides he doesn't like my plan; I have to doctor shop or go along with his personal opinion of how I should be treated based on an interpretation of a lab test... Sooo frustrating. 

 

The control celiacs have over their own health is a great thing; it forces many of us to change our diets for the better. I would even venture to guess that it might result in some of us living longer and healthier lives... if we make the best healthy coices while following the gluten-free diet.

 

... but, that's just my personal opinion. It's a different experience for everyone I know, but at this point for me, the hassle the diet causes me is worth the improvements in my health.

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It's great to know you are now skiing, Lisa. I'm only 4.5 months in and GET what you mean about it being harder at first after diagnosis. I'm in it. I CAN'TWAIT TO SKI!

Also, am with you Gemini on the AMA killing us. In Italy, every citizen is pre-screened and know within TWO WEEKS if they have Celiac! This ignorance here in the states is outrageous and I won't diverge into my own personal diatribe about being handed around the medical system for the past 8-10 years! My hematologist told me last year that he thought he was looking at a case of malpractice. Have you ever heard THAT come out of a doctor's mouth? Yet, he can't come out and say anything direct because they all have their little fiefdoms that the other mustn't tread on so it took A LOT of hints each appointment with him (touching my tender abdomen and telling me that's not normal; flipping through the GI doctor's reports acting nonplussed and asking me, "who is this Dr. __________ again?!?" He also told me that there was not one doctor (out of my slew of them) that had the WHOLE picture). This lead me to get back on the personal case of "Cali". What ARE all of these seemingly unrelated symptoms? Hmmmm????

Gluten-Free diet? Huh???

*WHAPO*!!! The rest is history along with my certain blood deficiencies shooting up rapidly since October. My skin looks VERY nice. I didn't even know I had nice skin!

I too, have a friend who cheats. She merely gets the itchy rash (that's her only symptom!). She went gluten free in 1998(!!!) but now is saying its a wheat allergy (goodness knows she wants to remain a non-conformist). Lately, she's been posting pictures of "glutenous" food on FB. I can't tell you how upset this makes me. She even teases me with it now, "look what I'M eating!". She believes that the severity of symptoms is positively correlated to whether or not it's a wheat allergy or Celiac (the greater the symptoms being Celiac). Her niece and nephew have excema and she wants them on a gluten-free diet but here she is cheating and telling me she doesn't want any "negative seeds planted in her mind". (In effect, "SHUT UP"!) Argh!!

Oh well, people have to make their own choices.

A question for you veterans: do you eat out? Dr. Fasano says we should eat out to educate the eating establishments so that this option becomes more and more viable for all of us. What do you think about this?

I ate out over the weekend and am paying the price. I may also be suffering from a little CC here and there. This is quite the process. I know it's the lucky autoimmune disease because we can control it and also, the fact my symptoms are horrendous makes me never want to cheat (everrrrrrrrr). I have had to continually repeat this "I'm lucky" mantra to myself today to get through it. Can't wait to move from rookie to veteran. How many steps does THAT take?

Cali

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Thank you, Irish. That's a good idea on keeping a symptoms list. Since you are the third person in a week who has spoken to me about expectations, I think I'll listen. I messed up last weekend because I went somewhere famished and am currently paying the price. I only wish I was in the place to have high expectations right now! The bargaining stage isn't bearing much fruit.

Maybe it was just a bad day. I see a lot of intelligent, supportive posts from Gemini. Have started taking an enzyme at mealtime but seriously wonder if anything is much help right now. I don't feel like a wuss today, just beaten. Tomorrow is a new day, eh?

Thanks for the support.

Cali

 

 

EVERY day is a healing day, Cali  ;)  That's my motto.

We're all living proof. 

 

I took digestive enzymes before meals and probiotics every day religiously the first year and I still take probiotics every morning.

I do eat out but I choose places declared safe by other celiacs on Find Me Gluten Free or Trip Advisor.

I waited to do this kind of splurging until 15 months in, however (again, this was just my experience based on a pretty ravaged gut)

Hang in there. 

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It's great to know you are now skiing, Lisa. I'm only 4.5 months in and GET what you mean about it being harder at first after diagnosis. I'm in it. I CAN'TWAIT TO SKI!

Also, am with you Gemini on the AMA killing us. In Italy, every citizen is pre-screened and know within TWO WEEKS if they have Celiac! This ignorance here in the states is outrageous and I won't diverge into my own personal diatribe about being handed around the medical system for the past 8-10 years! My hematologist told me last year that he thought he was looking at a case of malpractice. Have you ever heard THAT come out of a doctor's mouth? Yet, he can't come out and say anything direct because they all have their little fiefdoms that the other mustn't tread on so it took A LOT of hints each appointment with him (touching my tender abdomen and telling me that's not normal; flipping through the GI doctor's reports acting nonplussed and asking me, "who is this Dr. __________ again?!?" He also told me that there was not one doctor (out of my slew of them) that had the WHOLE picture). This lead me to get back on the personal case of "Cali". What ARE all of these seemingly unrelated symptoms? Hmmmm????

Gluten-Free diet? Huh???

*WHAPO*!!! The rest is history along with my certain blood deficiencies shooting up rapidly since October. My skin looks VERY nice. I didn't even know I had nice skin!

I too, have a friend who cheats. She merely gets the itchy rash (that's her only symptom!). She went gluten free in 1998(!!!) but now is saying its a wheat allergy (goodness knows she wants to remain a non-conformist). Lately, she's been posting pictures of "glutenous" food on FB. I can't tell you how upset this makes me. She even teases me with it now, "look what I'M eating!". She believes that the severity of symptoms is positively correlated to whether or not it's a wheat allergy or Celiac (the greater the symptoms being Celiac). Her niece and nephew have excema and she wants them on a gluten-free diet but here she is cheating and telling me she doesn't want any "negative seeds planted in her mind". (In effect, "SHUT UP"!) Argh!!

Oh well, people have to make their own choices.

A question for you veterans: do you eat out? Dr. Fasano says we should eat out to educate the eating establishments so that this option becomes more and more viable for all of us. What do you think about this?

I ate out over the weekend and am paying the price. I may also be suffering from a little CC here and there. This is quite the process. I know it's the lucky autoimmune disease because we can control it and also, the fact my symptoms are horrendous makes me never want to cheat (everrrrrrrrr). I have had to continually repeat this "I'm lucky" mantra to myself today to get through it. Can't wait to move from rookie to veteran. How many steps does THAT take?

Cali

To answer the 'veteran' question, it sort of just happens one day. It could be four months into the diet, it could be four years, just one day you'll realize you're doing everything right, without second guessing yourself at all. And however long it takes you is totally ok! It's ok to be a rookie!

 

As to eating out, it definitely can be trial and error. I am blessed in that I have no less than three dinner and one breakfast establishment within 40 minutes of me that GET IT. I mean, separate dishes for gluten free food, the whole nine yards. I have not been hit once at any of them. Yes, it's a risk every time, and I accept that.

 

I have a system for where I'm willing to eat. 1. Do they have a website? If so, it must have a gluten free menu on it. No restaurants that only have them in-house. 2. What look does the host/hostess give me when I say gluten free? If I get that deer in the headlights thing, I just get water. 3. What is it that's ON that gluten free menu? Is it just steak, baked potatoes, and green beans? Well, I can do that at home and I usually don't bother! If there's anything fried I always ask the question about the fryer and how they keep food straight in the kitchen. My favorite place always has the cook or shift manager bring out the food for the gluten free person, so the waitstaff can't get anything mixed up.

 

Places like Outback are usually pretty good, but in those circumstances you still need to be vigilant at each location you go to. Just because they have a gluten free menu doesn't mean they get it, is something I had to remind myself of over and over and over....

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Hi Cali!

 

I go to restaurants regularly now (only been vertical for about 5 months) with my husband, family and friends.  For now I bring my own because my no-no list is too long -- my hubby and sons are the only ones that can cook for me safely -- FOR NOW.  I plan to dine out at well screened gluten-free restaurants within the coming year.

 

With regard to training restaurants -- I find that we are all ambassadors by necessity.  I have given the "celiac vs gluten free ingredient" speech so many times over the years it rolls off the tongue...I find many wait staff ask me lots of questions -- even more so now that I simply order a glass of wine or a cup of coffee at the start of the meal and ask for their nicest plate when everyone is ordering the main meal.  It is great that we help educate folks -- just not so it impedes on your health or enjoyment of dining with family, friends and co-workers.

 

Edited to add:  -- I ask for a nice dish and then I place my small oval casserole type dish on top of it.  I do generally use their utensils -- as long as I feel safe, but do always carry my own set too.  Please keep in mind -- my case is a bit more extreme -- I know many celiacs that dine out safely as long as they are careful and do their research.

Edited by GottaSki

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i like to think about eating out more than i actually am brave enough to try.  ie:  we are going to florida - i am looking up gluten-free in ft myers beach, naples, and port st lucie.  and making a list of what to put in the cooler because i'm just not going to risk it.  it takes 2 weeks and if i gotta eat a ham samwich every day, i will.....  (o boo hoo, listen at me, haha this gets easier every time i go away.  i started out hauling around half the kitchen lolz)  i am lucky because it's just celiac and i avoid soy - also take it easy on certain things - but because it's 'just celiac' means just a little bit of oopsie will put me in a world of hurt FOR TWO WEEKS no getting around it.

 

ya know, it's really practice, tweaking, experimenting :)  i throw a bunch of stuff into the backpack now and as long as i can get (aluminum foil, paper plates <and i choose from the middle of the package in mixed company lolz, i bring my own drink(s) i even bring my own canned whipped cream to put on my dessert.  i eat before we go out and bring a snack.  or i will bring something just to chew on, like a salad, etc, and just drink wine if i am going out with other people.  

 

it's probably harder to convince other people that i am happy with my ham samwich!!!!!!! :P

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Jumping back in...

 

4-years gluten-free as of this week! Onward and upward, even if there are bumps in the road.

 

Gemini, I definitely know your frustration. My sister also doesn't stick to her diet nearly as well as she should (which worries me, but it's her health), and even my mother who deems herself a bit of an expert probably gets glutened more often than she realises. I just had one stupid day! and it probably wasn't even gluten that got me (f-ing soy, I say!). In any case, it was a reminder that I have to be super uber careful these days

 

Which is why I am currently munching on a post-work snack before going out, rather than worry about finding food. My man and I went out for a lovely dinner last saturday for our anniversary. I interrogated the chef when making reservations. They were very accomodating, everything was safe, and delicious, and I didn't get hit! yay! But even in a city like Toronto, it can be difficult, so best to go out prepared.

 

So, we all have wussy days, then things heal up and the sun comes out and all is better.

 

Now I'm off to find me some gluten-free beer.

Cheers!

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If all else fails, get some beer or wine!  If nothing else, it just makes a person happy to have a little glass of something good.  I am not a beer drinker but my husband absolutely loves Green's beer.  It's Belgian and pretty strong so you don't have to drink as much.  ;)

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Hey Peg -- you and I share a silly birthday - my 4th is next week - Happy "Birthday" to you!

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Jumping back in...

 

4-years gluten-free as of this week! Onward and upward, even if there are bumps in the road.

 

Gemini, I definitely know your frustration. My sister also doesn't stick to her diet nearly as well as she should (which worries me, but it's her health), and even my mother who deems herself a bit of an expert probably gets glutened more often than she realises. I just had one stupid day! and it probably wasn't even gluten that got me (f-ing soy, I say!). In any case, it was a reminder that I have to be super uber careful these days

 

Which is why I am currently munching on a post-work snack before going out, rather than worry about finding food. My man and I went out for a lovely dinner last saturday for our anniversary. I interrogated the chef when making reservations. They were very accomodating, everything was safe, and delicious, and I didn't get hit! yay! But even in a city like Toronto, it can be difficult, so best to go out prepared.

 

So, we all have wussy days, then things heal up and the sun comes out and all is better.

 

Now I'm off to find me some gluten-free beer.

Cheers!

 

Hi Pegleg84.  You and I are not so far neighbours.  I'm in Kitchener.

 

I went out to eat for the first time since I first learned about Celiac, which would be about 10 months.  I haven't been officially diagnosed  yet and need to tell my gastro doc that I'm Celiac next week.  Should be interesting.  (He didn't do a full Celiac panel and I only had mild villous atrophy so he didn't want to say Celiac.  He wanted me to go gluten free for 3 months and see how I was.  When I said I wasn't where I wanted to be after three months he said to make it another 6 months.  So that's my appointment next week.)

 

Anyway I went to a restaurant in Chinatown called Hibiscus.  They are completely gluten free and vegetarian.  I'm not veg, but my daughter has decided to go veg.  They were able to accomodate all my problems, gluten/dairy/soy and corn.  It was great.  I felt like a human again.  It was nice to be out socializing, living my life.  Ok, it was with a bunch of 16 year olds, but it was still nice.  We had a great day in Chinatown and then the ROM for the dinosaur exhibit.

 

The next day I was back in Toronto.  My husband and I were in the north part of town so we stopped by Goodbye Gluten.  I had a nice lunch and got some good cabbage rolls for dinner.  Also had some amazing biscotti.  Then we went to the Canada Blooms show and had a great day. 

 

It was just nice to know that I have these options.  Having so many intolerances, I've been afraid to go out anywhere.  Parking in downtown TO is a nightmare and carrying food for an entire day gets heavy.  So knowing that with a little research and faith there is a way to live life again, is nice.

 

As for the "wuss" of missing work, don't worry about it.  I had to quit my job because I couldn't walk anymore.  Didn't know that was all related to Celiac though.  It took another 2 years to find that out.

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Oh my goodness..."mild villous atrophy" ?????????????

 

So sorry, forgot my manners when I read the above quote.

 

Welcome Finding My Way....you have come to the right place.

 

Ask questions...snoop around posts by searching similar symptoms - read the "newbie 101" if you haven't had the opportunity...for goodness sake -- please, stick around.

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HI FINDING MY WAY

 

What the ....&^%$!  <_<


If I hear one more person say their doc said "it was only mild atrophy" or "you have mild celiac", I think my head will explode.

 

Ask the doc if you can be "mildly pregnant". 

 

Hon, you're one of us.

 

Welcome to the forum and please know we are here for you!

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Yes, welcome to the forum!

And what GottaSki and IrishHeart said, there's no such thing as "mild" celiac disease. You've either got it or you don't and you've got it.

 

Hibiscus was also one of the first places I went to when I moved here. I haven't been in a while, but so good! They have wonderful gluten-free/vegan treats too. I haven't made the trek to Goodbye Gluten yet (mostly cause I'm afraid I will leave it with a drained bank account)

 

I don't know how things are in Kitchener, but look up Ontario Gluten-Free (or something like that) and there's a database of gluten-free restaurants and such.

 

Good luck!

Peg

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Thanks for the welcome everyone!  I'm not sure why my gastro doc is so relunctant to say Celiac.  I'm suppose to tell HIM if I have it on our next appointment.  :blink:

 

Pegleg, Kitchener's not too bad for the gluten free stuff.  There are three places I go to that specialize in gluten free stuff, so I'm able to get treats when I need them. 

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Here is something you can tell him...

 

"Thanks Doc...I have Celiac Disease and you are fired" ;)

 

or "I have determined I have Celiac Disease and you need to read current research regarding my condition so you will know as much as I do".

 

Joking aside -- a good primary can take care of your follow up unless you need subsequent endoscopic biopsy....if that happens find the best Celiac specialist in your area.

 

Keep hanging out and ask questions - it really does make the transition much easier.

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    • My son is 13 and we have been dealing with his unusual issues for years. By 3rd grade, he was The Hulk, breaking things, punching holes in walls and raging. He had depression, anxiety and panic attacks. His skin would have rashes or turn bright red and i didn't understand why (now i know it's salicylic acid added to conditioner, sunscreen, lotion, ect). We realized that dyes were a problem and cut those out. Little by little, we removed sulfur, sulfites, preservatives, salicylates (aspirin-we assume he will be allergic to this but he has never had it and we won't ever test it, most fruits, spices, veggies and honey), nitrates, soy sauce and many more. He lived on an all home made, special diet and he was better but not well. (We did the Feingold and Failsafe Diet but that wasn't enough). He was diagnosed with hypersensitivity to medication by 5th grade (tried anti-anxiety meds-big mistake). Consecutive doses of anything would get stuck in his body and then the real fun started, full body rash, suicidal thoughts, vomiting and my least favorite-hallucinations. He was in the ER for a fall from a tree and they gave ibuprofen and Vicodin. Within 30 minutes the rash spread up and down his whole body (including under the damn cast). The worst night of my life was trying to keep him from breaking his own cast off and talking him down from trying to hurt himself.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             We tested my son for everything and anything, hormones, vitamin deficiency (later found out they don't test for nearly enough to really know) and thyroid. Everything was normal but a mildly low vitamin D level. He was very unhealthy, he was sick a LOT, allergies were bad, asthma and he developed food intolerances out of nowhere. We did a gluten/dairy free diet (because his sister is gluten/dairy free) but it made no difference and his diet was already so restricted. We did a year long food journal and also found an issue with pork, apples, citrus fruit, cinnamon, ect.  I researched my kid like it was my job. We tried many vitamins and supplements and he had bad reactions to many of them. I finally found a man with several of the same gene mutations (we tested with 23andme.com) who's Dr. thought it was a PST-Pathway issue. We decided to try the protocol of vitamins, supplements and amino acids to see if it made any difference and OMG, what a difference. At this point, we didn't have a pediatrician that actually listened so I asked several doctors about the specific vitamin/minerals/amino acids and kept all the does to a child size dose.  We had always used epsom salts as a response to a reaction in something, not as a preventative measure. We now soak his feet twice a day in Epsom salt water (or in the bath), it gives him a form of sulfur that his body was missing and now he can eat anything he wants (except soy sauce but we'll gladly leave that out). He takes molybdenum everyday with magnesium/calcium and vitamin D3 (and when we stop that, panic attacks come back. Weekly he takes milk thistle (we tried L-Glycine but too much gave him terrible insomnia (like 3 days of barely any sleep) and milk thistle works just as well to keep his liver open and working it's best), B vitamins, Cod liver oil capsules with Vitamins A and D and liquid Zinc.  His personality changed on the L-Glycine in a more outgoing way but then in a manic, not himself way so that scared us. Since the supplements started (6 months ago), his anxiety and depression is gone (and it was really controlling how we lived). He would never talk to people before...he was diagnosed with selective mutism but we felt that was incorrect and he was just very shy. He never liked talking with adults. Now, there is no problem, he is not super chatty with everyone but all he adults in our family noticed immediately. He is ready to stop home schooling and start high school next year. He has become a responsible, sweet, calm and caring child. No more daily fights, no more holes in the walls, no more rage. Our daughter has anorexia and we have been very busy dealing with her behaviors and missed the daily vitamins on occasion for several days....old son comes raging back. It doesn't take too long to figure out the mistake and gets him back where he needs to be. We did some genetic testing with a neurologist who specializes in metabolic function and while he tested for some helpful issues relating to hypersensitivity to medication, I still got the impression that he thought it was a placebo effect. We have burned through many therapists, pediatricians, a neuropsychologist, a psychiatrist, a gastroenterologist and possibly this neurologist. I hate not being taken seriously because while they may not agree with my ideas, they have nothing to offer in return.   
    • Yep no fruit, juice, sugar, or grains like oatmeal. The sugars glucose, fructose etc. Are common causes of flares in some. Sugar free fiber like nuts, but butters, cocanibs seem to be great for me. Keto diet sugar free high fat, mostly over cooked to mush or blended works great for me......heck as a baker I had to invent low carb, grain free, starch free bread. Sorta lead to a god like revelation and business took off with diabetics and my bakery.
    • Gastritis was my initial diagnoses before finding out I had celiac. The pains from the gastritis were terrible. I had to wake up in the middle of the night to eat cause I felt nauseous. The Doc prescribed me omeprozole and antacids. I took the meds for about a week but I cured it mostly by not drinking and eliminated caffeine intake. Alcohol was one of the main causes for mine 
    • The UC is a whole different beast. I’ve been eliminating tons of food. Meat is definitely good to me. I can eat all the steak, chicken, and pork without problems. I agree that paleo would be great for me. I’m gonna look more into their recipes.  Have you had any problems with fruits and veggies causing flare ups? I make smoothies with mixed berries, banana, gluten free oatmeal, spinach, and a splash of juice. It seems to be a cause. Maybe it’s the high fiber? I’m not sure. That and caffeine. I’m having a hard time eliminating caffeine though  
    • Pain wise a glutening celiac gets me more central gut pain and much worse with sharpness, urge to vomit, gurgles etc. UC is more along the the outside edges of your abdomen from the sides, lower area around the belt line, and upper area right under the rib cage, and is more of a boat and pleasure pain like your intestines are huge feeling.  UC triggers alot more gas, and makes you want to lie down I get the urge to massage and press on the pressure areas as it seems to help.
      Timing wise Celiac glutening I notice within 20-60mins and main vomiting starts in 1-3hours after eating it. UC flare you get it like 4-18hours or later depending on transit time of your food. A glutening will normally result in both a celiac reaction and a later UC reaction. For me a gluten CC or consumption issue also causes neurological symptoms, this is not true for some people but for me I also have a gluten ataxia, so the anxiety, panic, fog, mind looping, numb hands, loss of coordination or straight up motor loss is definite sign for me. Others will have to keep track with a food diary to nail down there own as every person can have a slightly different reaction.

      I also find with UC I do not directly vomit, Sometimes with UC it can trigger constipation and if not remedied in 12-24 hours leads to m system backing up and vomiting. Celiac can also cause me constipation but there is a slight difference in where it seems to get stuck at first. Hard to explain but you can sort of feel it. Also I find a gluten celiac response will result in a week or more of constipation issues. Starting mid section then moving to the outside gut area and  but some people do not get these and get D instead. So this is not very reliable.

      UC flare ups for me with my damage also always have bloody stools, worse flare ups its not just streaks but clots. Red and Dark red show it is in the large intestines. If you get tar like black  and red it is either a sign it is way back in the large intestine or in the stomach or small intestine. This makes my Anemia SOO much worse. Imagine how you feel with the loss of blood coupled with inability to efficiently absorb nutrients like iron and magnesium

      Thing to recall is UC is mostly the large intestine while celiac is mostly the small, so symptoms and trying to get the feeling of where the problem is can help.  Also if you get a glutening expect to have the UC flare up right after the celiac flare up.

      NOTE it is hard for me to say still, on the exact details and clarity, it has been since june of last year that I had a major gluten consumption issue. UC I get more regular but without the direct comparison in a while my memory is a bit iffy. Just trying to recall those exact pains and feelings from that last time. Also UC seems to wax and wane in and out while almost always being present for months in the background you just feel a bit off in the gut. SO many triggers, I felt that for years I swear til I went to this keto diet and dropped all fruit, sugar, carbs, and grains. Could have been the anemia, but I think it was more of a combination of the inflammation, bleeding, gas, and just being uncomfortable.
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