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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Help Interpreting Lab Results?
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5 posts in this topic

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glide4234    1

I just received my blood work from the Dr. after requesting a celiac panel. Just wondering if there is just a chance I'm celiac or if it is pretty likely. I have an appointment set up with a GI dr. But don't see him for a couple of weeks.

Here are my test results:

Transglutaminase Ab IgA

(H) 9.0. <4.0

Weak Positive

Anti-Gliad IgA, deamidated

(H) 23units. <20

Weak Positive

Anti-Gliad IgG, deamidated

(H) 120 units. <20

Moderate to Strong Positive

Endomysial Ab, S

(H)

Result: Positive Titer 1:40

Reticulin Ab

Negative

Any help interpreting these results would be greatly appreciated. :-)

Thanks so much!!!

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mushroom    1,205

With a positive endomysial antibody titer, there really isn't much doubt about it.  All your results are either weak or strong positive, except for the Reticulin Ab which is an outdated test and not recommended any more in testing for celiac.  Yes, I think it is time you started learning about the gluten free diet :)   Welcome to the club, and to the board.

 

You can start your reading with the Newbie Info 101 in the Coping With Celiac section.  It has loads of useful information. 

 

You may be referred to a GI for a scope and biopsies, which will probably be recommended to you.  Depending on your symptoms, it is often a good idea to go ahead and get this biopsy confirmation, because it gives an opportunity to assess the damage and a baseline against which to compare your healing.  It is also a chance to find out if there are any other problems.  He needs to take at least 6 samples for biopsy.

 

Do be sure to ask additional questions as they arise and we will do our best to answer them.  I wish you speedy healing.

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nvsmom    332

Welcome to the board and, as Mushroom said, to the club. I agree with everything she said.  With an EMA titre that high, you probably have a fair amount of intestinal damage from celiac disease, and then with so many other positive tests... I'd say there is virtually no doubt about it.   :(

 

When you see the GI doctor, you might want to ask about nutritional deficiencies. May celiacs are low in D, B12, calcium, ferritin, iron, and potassium. Some docs will check your bone health because osteoporosis can be a very real result of low calcium levels. You might want to have your thyroid checked too; there is a strong link to Hashimoto's. In fact I had mine routinely checked and it came back as hashimotos.

 

You might want to keep eating gluten if you can, until at least your visit with the GI. If he wants to do a biopsy, most people have to keep eating gluten for an accurate biopsy result.

 

Best wishes. I hope you are well soon.

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GottaSki    459

No doubts here - welcome to the club!

The transition to gluten-free living can be tough - read all you can -- as Mushroom mentioned - start with the Newbie 101 thread and ask questions - it really is the best was to speed the transition period along.

Don't remove gluten until you have seen GI and you are certain you have had all necessary tests - this starting data is important - once gluten is limited or removed - you lose this valuable information.

Hamg in there - the waiting is no fun, but it is worth getting a proper diagnosis when possible.

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glide4234    1

Thanks so much for your replies!

 

I look forward to meeting with the GI doc, going gluten free, and finally feeling better.

 

I've got lots to learn and I am thankful that this site exists :-)

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