• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Celiac.com E-Newsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsCeliac.com E-Newsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Making Food For Others
0

63 posts in this topic

hey, melissa - hang in there - you might have withdrawal symptoms before you start feeling better.  most of us quit dairy in the beginning. i did for about 6 months to give damaged villi healing time.  eat simply, that is your best bet.  i went crazy at first, trying to substitute 'familiar' foods - i finally just (mostly) ate boar's head turkey on udi's bread lolz not very exciting but it works.  it is still my "go-to" when my insides are feeling wonky  :)  and feeling better is gradual.  i think one day i woke up and said "WOW.  I FEEL GREAT!" not realizing i was feeling better and better every day.  have your vitamin levels checked - i have to supplement with D and B12 - you might want to look into a gluten-free multi-vitamin.  as you heal, you will absorb more of the vitamins and nutrients your body needs to thrive.  when i was first diagnosed, i caught every flu, cold, etc - my hair was brittle and i had rash after rash.  could not keep weight on at all.  my nails broke easily and i woke up every day thinking about taking a nap.  i am about 2 1/2 years in and happy to say that for the first time in since i can remember, i have gone the whole winter without so much as a cold.  i didn't even get a flu shot!  so, there is proof that my antibodies are staying busy keeping me well instead of attacking my insides/gluten.  stay around here and you will get alot of helpful advice!  this place and these people are priceless.  i would have done much worse (maybe not even stuck to the diet - it's hard!!) without all the tips/tricks i have learned here.  good luck and ask away - the only stupid question is the one not asked :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


Well thank you and I have been eating simple. I pretty much live off of boneless skinless chicken on grill and potatoes and veggies. I make enough the night before for lunch the next day. I never was into breads but I did love pasta so its hard. I think the hardest thing is having 4 kids and hubby that dont need to do this and just making their foods make me very sick. Im not sure what to do about that but I will have my kids checked out too. Thanks for the help

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Look, guys, if some of you don't quit with the misinfo on the USDA "natural flavors" loophole, which allows gluten in barley and rye byproducts, and from processed starches and other grain byproducts which may not be gluten free, to be applied or used as flavoring or seasonings,  you are going to inadvertently make somebody sick.   USDA does not care at all about gluten free labeling according to a statement I have read from the current Secretary Vilsack, he says companies following VOLUNTARY food labeling for the top 8 allergens is enough and does not think the USA needs stricter standards.  Never assume. We do not have gluten free labeling standards here at this time, April 2013, in the United States. 

We may not have official gluten free labeling but what we do have, or most of us do, is a brain.....which can easily be used to figure out what is safe and what is not.  It requires some research and learning but we do not need the government to figure out what is safe for us.  Peter gave the correct information on Natural Flavorings so listen to Peter!  :rolleyes:

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im just so hoping this all will get easier with time. Im not a patient person and being swallon like im 9 months pregnant is so not feeling good. I cant even fit into my own clothes. Im stressed to max

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It really does get better Melissa. Each of us takes a different amount of time to heal. Although I had  trained as a chef I had not worked at it in 30 years until I came down with celiac about 8 years ago or. Having it really awakened me and my family and forced me to change for the better.  If cooking for your family makes  you sick I"m sure they will adjust. Try some different  gluten free pastas for them. Let yourself get creative with gluten-free cooking. There are many cook books out there and recipes online. Its a challenge but you can make it fun for you and your family.

good luck

 

 

 

Im just so hoping this all will get easier with time. Im not a patient person and being swallon like im 9 months pregnant is so not feeling good. I cant even fit into my own clothes. Im stressed to max

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


Well thank you and I have been eating simple. I pretty much live off of boneless skinless chicken on grill and potatoes and veggies. I make enough the night before for lunch the next day. I never was into breads but I did love pasta so its hard. I think the hardest thing is having 4 kids and hubby that dont need to do this and just making their foods make me very sick. Im not sure what to do about that but I will have my kids checked out too. Thanks for the help

Buy gluten-free pasta.  Tinkyada is very good!  Just be sure not to overcook it and if you use a plastic strainer, you'll need to buy a new one.  My Italian husband never noticed that I had changed the pasta.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well thank you and I have been eating simple. I pretty much live off of boneless skinless chicken on grill and potatoes and veggies. I make enough the night before for lunch the next day. I never was into breads but I did love pasta so its hard. I think the hardest thing is having 4 kids and hubby that dont need to do this and just making their foods make me very sick. Im not sure what to do about that but I will have my kids checked out too. Thanks for the help

if you are putting your food directly onto a pre-gluten-free grill, you might be cross contaminating yourself - put yours in tinfoil before putting on grates.  stop licking your fingers when you are making kids' food lolz that was one i learned the hard way.  tinkyada pasta is da bomb - i am also a huge pasta lover and tink comes pretty close - it even holds up well in pasta salads.  you can make their food (dinners, at least) gluten free with out that much change.   i will make most of the meal gluten-free (say, tacos) so:  meat <i season my own with onion & garlic powder, cumin, chili powder, etc s&p all gluten-free)  top with (now i can eat it) monterrey jack cheese, lettuce tomato, guacamole, salsa, sour cream.  i heat up some refried beans, and use corn taco shells, for example.  the husband wants rice a roni <not gluten free!  so i fix it and move the pot very farrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr away from the rest of the meal.  tends to remind him that he needs to be careful.  how old are your kids?  we also have 4, but the youngest is in last year of college already.  i think she and our son probably would test to be ncgi at least....  but their symptoms are minor to them maybe because their bodies are not damaged enough for them to care yet.  son had onset of type 1 diabetes at age 19 so he already struggles with his diet.  if they were young enough that i was still feeding them, i would feed them gluten-free anyway whether i had them tested or not.  i changed their diapers....  'nuff said lolz !  :D

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for all the tips it realy does help to hear from all the different views people have and tips. I think Im finaly comming around to the change. I even got hubby to make sons Bday cake as I was not doing it. As for myself I even made a apple crisp glutin free so I can have a treat to as well as some sorbiet ice cream yummy. Im learning slowly. I just cant stand feeling so horrible all the time so deff need to change. My dr said Im in bad shape left untreated for 30 plus years is not good. I have been sick since a very young child. So thanks all for the support

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Torani flavored syrups are one example of a gluten-containing ingredient being part of "natural flavors" and not being otherwise declared. The FAQ page on their website lists the following flavors as containing gluten:

Bacon, Classic Caramel, Sugar Free Classic Caramel, Toasted Marshmallow and Sugar Free French Vanilla.

Here are the ingredients for the Classic Caramel: Pure cane sugar, water, natural flavors, citric acid, sodium benzoate, potassium sorbate (to preserve freshness). I have one of the SF Classic Caramel and it does not say that it contains wheat or gluten anywhere on the package. But it does, according to their website.

I just wanted to repost this. It looks as though this is an example like Peter was looking for. It isn't "hidden" in that they clearly state on their website that these flavors contain gluten, but you'd NEVER know if you only looked at the label. So, on the label, it is hidden. It may be rare, but it does happen.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just wanted to repost this. It looks as though this is an example like Peter was looking for. It isn't "hidden" in that they clearly state on their website that these flavors contain gluten, but you'd NEVER know if you only looked at the label. So, on the label, it is hidden. It may be rare, but it does happen.

Exactly -- and it's the type of thing that makes me nervous about anything that lists "natural flavors." I read the label at the coffee shop, itched from it later, and found this on Torani's website. Reading the label did me no good.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was hoping someone would repost this. I strictly avoid everything that says "natutal flavors" on the label because even though I am not gluten intolerant, my wife is. And seeing her in pain because I haven't been cautious enough doesn't work for me.

 

I'm not convinced that natural flavors are safe in the US even though Peter is very compelling in his arguments.

I just wanted to repost this. It looks as though this is an example like Peter was looking for. It isn't "hidden" in that they clearly state on their website that these flavors contain gluten, but you'd NEVER know if you only looked at the label. So, on the label, it is hidden. It may be rare, but it does happen.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cookingpapa, I am going to offer another avenue to relaxing about flavors.

There are a number of food manufacturers who have a policy that any gluten will be explicitly named in the ingredients list and never hidden. They include some of the largest companies in the business, and apply to all their brands and products worldwide.

Here's a list from a source I trust.

With these companies, you don't have to call and ask. Indeed, if you call Kraft, the customer service representative will tell you to read the label. That is because formulas change, and the product you have may not match the current ingredients.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well Hello everyone.

 

         Im a brand new memeber and have been reading all these post and just soaking it all in. Im having a hard time with all this at this point and assumeit will get easier at one point. I am a mother of 4 kids so making food for them has even been gettting me sick too does anyone know what to do in this situation. Im very stressed out with it all. I cant even get myself out of bed someday because im so sick or at times Im just depressed. Any Idea for help

Hi Melissa! I hope you are slowly figuring things out. I have found a wonderful gluten-free bread mix, and my kids even request it ("Mommy, could you make the gluten-free bread?"). I am not sure if I am allowed to mention the name here? Moderators, is that OK? I am getting my daughter tested this week as well, as she has tummy issues. Good luck!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is perfectly okay to mention a product you have enjoyed, so long as you are not associated with the company that makes it and do not have a pecuniary interest in the product. :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You'll be great at this after a bit of time and practice, Melissa! I only cook gluten free for my myself and my husband and when people come over.  I make a yummy tinkyada spiral pasta salad with mozarella and tomato and other stuff and people are always surprised it is gluten free. 

 

If you happen to live where they have Wegman's -- I made the wegmans gluten-free brownies tonight and holy cow I have to stop myself from eating the whole batch!!  So good.  Nobody would know the difference.  Your kids can still enjoy the traditional "sweet treats" -- you just have to be a little creative and find brands that work for you.  I wish I had some vanilla ice cream to put on these brownies....yum!   (I am mostly eating healthy but sometimes you gotta have a treat) :)

 

I still have some non gluten-free items in the house so my husband can make a regular sandwich or whatever for himself but we have separate items like butter tubs etc to help avoid cross-contamination. 

 

You can do this! :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just wanted to repost this. It looks as though this is an example like Peter was looking for. It isn't "hidden" in that they clearly state on their website that these flavors contain gluten, but you'd NEVER know if you only looked at the label. So, on the label, it is hidden. It may be rare, but it does happen.

That is old information, and their website is out of date.  Caramel coloring/flavoring and vanilla flavoring  are no longer considered to contain gluten.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is old information, and their website is out of date. Caramel coloring/flavoring and vanilla flavoring are no longer considered to contain gluten.

Can you provide a source for this?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Caramel color is one of those celiac urban myths that just won't go away.

Here is Shelley Case's take on it, from Gluten-Free Diet A Comprehensive Resource Guide:

Although gluten-containing ingredients (barley malt syrup and starch hydrolysates) can be used in the production of caramel color, North American companies use corn as it has a longer shelf life and makes a superior product. European companies use glucose derived from wheat starch, however caramel color is highly processed and contains no gluten.

[Emphasis in original]
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well Im still not all the way there but am learning slowing some of the secrets in glutin free eating. love the support here

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a question to anyone out there that may be able to answer it. How does anyone afford to shop glutin free is there a good place to shop that is affordable. I have a house of 5 and my pockets aren't deep enough to afford the cost of glutin free foods. Help

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't buy processed gluten free foods. Use whole, naturally gluten free foods. Beans, lentils, rice, corn, buckwheat, quinoa, eggs, fruits and vegetables that are in season, lots of root veggies and winter squash when in season. Small amounts of meats or fish.

There are lots of blogs with inexpensive, whole food recipes. We do dinner with a family once a week, and for the six of us, the full cost of dinner runs between $15 and $30 (usually when we do salmon fillets ;) ), including two to three leftover servings for lunch the next day.

What sorts of foods do you usually eat and are willing to eat?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i usually 'splurge' on:  bread, pasta, (i still use lactaid, but i probably don't need to) i have no reaction to boar's head cold-cuts, so i buy a little for me and a cheaper brand for everybody else, pizza crust, burger/hot dog buns <so, still bread items..  the 'fake' soy bragg's enzyme sauce, certain flours <and that you will collect different ones over time.  i don't use pre-mixed - just combine depending on what i'm making.  if i find (omgosh, udi's cinnamon buns on the reduced rack for a dollar a package, HELLO i bought all of them haha :) ) a deal on something i will load up the freezer.  if you're not feeding everyone gluten-free, just use (say) one burger bun for you and feed the rest regular wheat buns.  that saves me $$ i eat my sloppy joe on my expensive bread and he can eat his on the cheap-os.  everything else i can usually fake lolz :D  and a few years ago, we started planting veggies and can them ourselves.  that way, i know exactly what sort of (vinegar, NATURAL FLAVORINGS LOLOL etc) are going into our food.   if i make a bunch of something and freeze it, i have a dinner for myself if everyone decides they really need to eat kentucky fried chicken or whatever.  or if i have to run out the door, i usually have something to chuck into my backpack so i won't starve to death.  i swear, sometimes, i won't be hungry until i leave the house!!  i think my car makes me hungry haha

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is old information, and their website is out of date.  Caramel coloring/flavoring and vanilla flavoring  are no longer considered to contain gluten.

Are you stating that Torani's website is out of date? If so, what is your source?

 

http://www.torani.com/faqs Under product-related questions.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you stating that Torani's website is out of date? If so, what is your source?

It may be based on outdated thinking about certain ingredients. I already responded here regarding caramel color.

 

http://www.celiac.ca/index.php/about-celiac-disease/what-to-eat/'>Here is a link to the Canadian Celiac Association page that lists vanilla as safe.

 

As testing technology has advanced over time, some things, like these, that were once feared to contain gluten have now been scientifically shown not to contain it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      106,421
    • Total Posts
      930,469
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      63,848
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    glutenfreekiddo
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Hello Anonymous, and if nobody has said as much yet, welcome Don't worry (difficult to do when it can cause anxiety :P) it's very early days and you have a lot of healing to come.  If you've not already seen it there's advice and further info here:    It gets easier over time as checking becomes routine, you know your 'safe' products and your eating pattern changes. You'll get there  Maybe start a thread of your own if you'd like some input from others? Finally, back on topic. My Aunt has narcolepsy and although she's fiercely resistant to giving up gluten she has now made a connnection to eating bread and it's onset. As often, not conclusive but suggestive...
    • Hello again   Well first thing is the - Usual disclaimers apply... and this is something you have to follow up with your doctors as you know. But it's helpful sometimes to get another perspective so here's this layman see's from outside.  What I have seen from the various results posted here is that people's numbers vary wildly and, just as important, the numbers often don't bear any direct relationship to the level of intestinal damage revealed via endoscopy. Ultimately although you're not scoring much above positive, you are scoring a positive  and there are a couple of other risk factors you've mentioned that are suggestive if not conclusive - you have another autoimmune which raises the odds of having another one for example.  You've had two tests that are positive. The purpose of taking the second test was either to invalidate or confirm the first. I'd suggest it's achieved the latter, at least inasmuch as a GI may want to check you via endoscopy. That's still the 'gold standard' of celiac diagnosis and would give you an idea if there's any intestinal damage. I suspect with 2 positive tests and the history above that's what they'll suggest.  If your doctor or GI doesn't want to proceed with that you have a decision to make. Push for a second opinion or new doctor or if you're done with testing give the gluten free diet a proper try. Make a journal and see if some of those subtle things you reference may actually be symptoms. Fwiw, there are a lot of people here whose thyroid issues improved dramatically once they were gluten free, so whether celiac or gluten sensitive you should certainly give the diet a try. Only however once the testing is completed and remember: 
    • Hi! I've just been recently diagnosed as Celiac through the whole biopsy-shebang, and I have a little bit of insight on the whole diagnosis thing and how I was eventually diagnosed, and my advice for you. Brace yourself, this might be a bit long, but it might be worth the read and I promise I will eventually get to the point. If you don't want the huge story, skip to the long line of capital As: I first saw my doctor when I had a few problems swallowing. I've compared it to when you're nervous and you feel like you have a lump in your throat - but after I eat and (sometimes) drink. I just mentioned briefly it to my family doctor when I was addressing another issue, but right away he referred me to a gastroenterologist and ordered a barium swallow x-ray test. The x-ray came back completely normal, and so the g.e. then suspected GERD, put me on acid blockers to see if they would work, no harm done sort of thing. The only thing I got out of the acid blockers were the side effects, so it was back to square 1. The g.e. said that the next test he could do was an upper endoscopy with biopsies. (hint: the celiac test!) Wanting to find a solution to my problems, the endoscopy was scheduled. Pretty painless, I was in and out in a day, but the results took much much longer. Biopsies, or the little pieces of my esophagus, stomach, and small intestine, were sent to the lab, and they came back clean. I didn't really go back to the g.e. for a whole year after that because life became busy, I wasn't prompted to follow up, and I just dismissed the swallowing problems the best I could and went on my way. Now, I've never been huge on the gluten, big bread-y sandwiches or croissants or pies were never foods that I super "enjoyed". I wouldn't feel bad after eating them, I just didn't like the taste of bread so much, but I loved cookies, cake and a lot of other things that do have gluten in them. I lead a lowish gluten life but I wasn't really monitoring it that way. Everything changed when I got really nasty (systemic) poison ivy. My eyes were swollen shut, and the rash was everywhere. I almost went to the hospital, but cooped out at the family doctor's place and got a script for prednisone (a steroid). But, I found that after I had tapered off the steroids, I had magically become lactose intolerant. So back to the family doctor again probably because I broke my toe or something, but we also got to talk about this magical lactose intolerance business (because I love anything dairy and it was indeed devastating). He was surprised as there is literally no correlation between steroids and becoming lactose intolerant. He asked me if I still had the swallowing problems, which I did, and so it was back to the g.e. for round 3. because my family doctor "does not believe in coincidences". Meeting with the G.E., he mainly addressed the swallowing problems telling me that he had done what he could to diagnose with the technology that we had at the highly specialized hospital that we were at, and I would have to travel about 3 hours away to see a different doctor who would do some tests involving the muscles in the esophagus. But right before I was about to leave, we started talking about lactose intolerance. He brought up other foods that I was avoiding (if any), and then the conversation went to gluten. I mentioned that I had an aunt that was gluten-sensitive. He advised that I do the blood test that can show an indication of celiac whenever in the future. I decided to do it that day. At this point in time, I was not eating much gluten because of the fact that it was personal preference. The normal range for values in this test is from 0 to 20. A few weeks later, I learned that I scored a 35. A second upper endoscopy with biopsies was scheduled, but this time I was told to eat a moderate amount of gluten everyday before the procedure. I ate about two slices of bread per day, which is more than I normally would. I was normal for the first two-three weeks of the gluten plus diet, but then I became really sick. I started getting the normal celiac symptoms, like diarrhea and extreme tiredness. Near the end, I had debilitating stomach pain and I was 2 times more asleep than awake each day. I couldn't do the 2 pieces of bread a day some days, but the pain was still there. I knew that I wouldn't ever have to force myself to eat bread for a test ever again. I was called a few days before my endoscopy telling me that a kid in a worse state than me had to take the OR during my time. I forced myself to eat more bread for another month and a half. The day finally came. I was diagnosed celiac, which I have concluded to be initiated by (1) the steroids/poison ivy and (2) the gluten binge fest.  AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA Celiac Disease isn't completely understood yet. Most of the time if you weren't showing symptoms when you were a baby (so your case) it means that celiac was/could be triggered by an event in your life that causes stress on the body (like stress, physical injury, etc.).  The positive result that you got from the blood test doesn't automatically mean celiac, but it could. Here's some options: Talk to your doctor (or a different doctor) or even a specialist gastroenterologist (you can get a referral from a family doctor (general physician)) and see if you can do the blood test again, you have to have some kind of gluten for this to work in advance, so if you don't want to break your gluten-free streak, than don't really invest in this option. If you feel comfortable, you could even ask to do this test under a few scenarios (no gluten (now) and after a gluten binge, compare results). If you do this test and your indication is low off gluten and then high after gluten, I'd probably skip the biopsy. That's a strong enough sign that you don't need to put yourself through the painful-gluten binge. Maybe this is what that first doctor just assumed. But having that test when you haven't had any gluten could make the difference - it acts as a control. Go straight to the biopsy. You could do this, but I'd probably do the blood test first. I went through a lot of stress with the gluten-binge that you have to do to get an accurate result, you would also be breaking your gluten-free diet that may/may not be helping you right now. Do nothing, stay on your gluten free diet hoping that it is helping you. But if you are not celiac or gluten-sensitive (celiac before it starts to wreck your small intestine), going gluten free isn't healthy - you can do some research on this if it interests you. If you feel bad/unhealthy after going gluten free it's probably a sign. Good luck, also know that you might come to a point of stress in your life that can start celiac's destructive path. Ultimately, it is your body, and you should not feel forced or hesitate to act on health issues that impact you.
    • I'm sorry that life is so hard right now. Really.  I can't imagine working 3 jobs and trying to manage this terrible illness.  I think about American society and their obsession with food often.  Whenever you look at the internet, there are all these fabulous gluten-free recipes, but when you don't have time or money to cook these things, a simple gluten-free lifestyle is just that - simple. There isn't a lot of variety, so it's kind of boring. But, I guess I have gotten used to being boring. I just eat corn chex and fruit or yogurt for breakfast. I eat a lot of eggs, beans, rice, corn tortillas, nuts, chicken, fruit and veggies.  A loaf of gluten-free bread will last me 4-6 months in the freezer.  I buy a bag of dried beans for $1.29, I soak them overnight, and put them in the crockpot the next day. I add different spices, sometimes chicken and Voila! - dinner is ready when I get home from a long day. Family gatherings are miserable and I haven't quite figured out the best way to deal yet. If my grandmother were still alive, I imagine she would be a lot like yours - well-meaning but not really able to understand the nitty-gritty.   I just reassure my family that I am fine and that they really shouldn't do anything special for me. I bring a bag of Hershey's kisses or other gluten-free candy I can nibble on along with my meal and then I try to treat myself to a nicer home cooked meal later in the week when I have time to cook - because who has time to cook during Christmas???? And, I agree with knitty knitty. If someone else in your family/friends were gluten-free for medical reasons, it would make socializing a bit easier. One of my husband's good friends is NCGS. When we get together as a group, we can make each other special dishes and it helps to feel less isolated.  Good luck!  
    • Hi!  Um, please forgive my quirky sense of humor..... Celiac Disease is genetic... All first degree relatives of people diagnosed with Celiac Disease should be tested for the disease, too.  Gall bladder problems are often associated with Celiac Disease.  Your diagnosis might save your whole family from further medical problems as they age and the disease progresses... You need to set a good example if relatives are similarly diagnosed.... and then everybody will have to eat gluten free at family gatherings....  
  • Upcoming Events