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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Cookbook Recommendations?
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15 posts in this topic

Hi, I'm a busy working mom who was never an accomplished cook to begin with, though I enjoy it.

 

Now that restaurants are less than simple, I'd like to use this opportunity to cook more at home.

I don't really need to start with baking -- I was never that into cookies and cakes, but I'd like to find quick and easy recipes for things with a little spice and flair:  Mexican, Indian etc.  Even better if it's meals I can share with the (non Celiac and not adventurous) family.  And maybe prepare ahead on the weekends.

 

There are so many gluten-free cookbooks out there, can anyone recommend one or two to start with that sound like they might work for me?

 

Thanks.

 

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You are right about there being so many glutenfree cookbooks out there. I have about 25 of them and there is only one that suits my tastes. Not only is the author from my specific area of the country where we are used to certain foods but she gives substitutions for many things which is most helpful to me since I also can't have corn or soy. And she uses sorghum flour which I am especially fond of. This was the most recent cookbook I got and the one I consistently refer to...but for me it was very hard to find a glutenfree cookbook that suits my specific tastes and needs.

 

You have very different tastes than me as I do not like Mexican, Indian or spicy. Can you name any specific recipes you are looking for. If no one here can suggest a cookbook I think you might have luck going to google and searching for glutenfree recipes Mexican or gluten free recipes Indian or glutenfree recipes spicy. I just went there and typed in glutenfree recipes Mexican and ended up on youtube watching a quick little video from a site called yummy yummy on how to make a quick and easy Mexican enchilada pie in the microwave.

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Now that sounds like a cookbook I would be interested in.  I don't do Mexican, Indian or spicy either, nor Asian of any kind.  AND I love sorghum :D   Can you share?

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The cookbook I am referring to that is most helpful to me is called gluten-free Makeovers by Beth Hillson. And I think it a good book for anyone beginning a glutenfree diet. I wish I had it as my first book as the other ones seemed to overwhelm me, make things more complicated than necessary, and ask for things that were the author's own preference instead of trying to be helpful to the readers.

 

For me the book was informative in a practical and down to earth way. It lists different glutenfree flours, describes them and tells you what percentage to use in mixes. Best for me is a section in the back of the book listing substitutions for many things. My other books always ask for corn, oats and soy in recipes none of which I can have but this book describes corn free replacements and says you can use quinoa flakes to replace oats. I am usually never at a loss for quinoa flakes as I eat them as hot cereal just about every day. And the book gave me very helpful tips for using a bread machine (the author ever has the same brand and model as mine).

There are recipes for things I am used to eating such as chicken marsala, pierogies, spaghetti and meatballs, potato pancakes, chicken nuggets, and sour cream coffee cake.

 

I don't fault anyone for liking spicy foods but I prefer the clean simple taste of food not covered up by spices. And I don't want any mint, lime, cumin, cinnamon or cloves in my dinner food. Cumin is the absolute worse spice to me...it smells and tastes like stinky socks. :)

 

Enough of me. I do hope the original poster finds some recipes or cookbooks to their liking. I really only put this here in case it might be helpful to others since the book has been so helpful to me.

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That sounds really interesting, Sensitive Me.  I've been wondering about what flours i should get in my home, and some fairly basic recipes.  I really just need to find the time to stock up and get some food to cook!  Thanks.

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I get recipes from all over. I have gotten a few great ones lately from the TV show " The Chew". Sub gluten-free pasta or soy sauce if needed.

Here's is a thread you should watch. If you see something you like, we would be happy to help you make it & give you a recipe.

http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/75238-the-whats-for-dinner-tonight-chat/page-370#entry863090

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At first I waited to see what foods I would like best before deciding on what types of cookbooks to buy. I was a pasta and bread junkie. Over time I have learned that the internet is my best friend. My "cookbook" is a three ring binder of printed out recipes, I only keep what I like. I also use my old Betty Crocker and Better Homes and Gardens cookbooks extensively, even for baking. Once I started learning about flours, which there is no reason to line someone's pocketbook to do when the information is free all over the internet, I started baking again. I accepted that failures happen, and so what? Since adopting that attitude I have found I don't need gluten free cookbooks, just good ones. Use your old ones, use the internet to find out what to sub and with time it will become so second nature you won't have your cookbook covered in sticky notes. :lol:

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I don't know of any cookbooks, and I wish someone would write one, on where to even begin when having to go suddenly glutenfree. A book that just answers simple questions such as I want to make turkey or chicken gravy and am used to using wheat flour so what is the best glutenfree flour to use instead. Or I want to make a white sauce for scalloped potatoes and what is the best gluten free flour to use for that. And just how to make some plain bisquits. Or what to use on chicken for breading. In other words, a book that follows the Kiss principle of keep it simple stupid. Some book that kinda dips your toes in the glutenfree waters instead of plunging you into a raging river of information that tends to overwhelm people.

 

It seems to me there are about at least 20 glutenfree flour replacements to choose from, and they don't keep well either. For baking you are usually told you need some type of mix of glutenfree flours. So the book should tell a few basic flours to always keep on hand. I know I am not the only one here who bought a bunch of glutenfree flours and things and never got around to using them before they expired and had to be throw away. And I remember reading several here like me who essentially wasted money on things when beginning a glutenfree diet.

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I have about 500 cookbooks that I use.  There are tons of gluten free books but if you are seeking books for cooking as opposed to baking, so many books and recipes are naturally gluten free.  If they are not, they are extremely easy to change.  The only gluten free books I use are for baking when substitutions are trickier. 

 

I do a ton of ethnic cooking.  Probably about 250 of my books are intriguing books on Israeli, Lebanese, Chinese, Thai, Japanese, Mexican, Italian, Moroccan, Turkish...

 

It would be helpful to find websites (I've a few) on the properties of gluten free starches and just sub here and there.  For example, when making a bechamel sauce, sorghum is known to most closely replicate wheat flour.  Tips and tricks like that make all the difference.  Add them to regular cookbooks and you've got it!

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For me the most useful places to get recipe ideas from is from blog sites. There are plenty of gluten free bloggers out ther who are trying out recipes. Some are even adventurous enough to try to make gluten free naan bread!

 

Try typing gluten free recipes and you'll find a lot of bloggers out there. I especially like glutenfreegoddess. She even has a itunes app!

 

I started off my gluten free cooking by doing a replacement of all my chinese cooking sauces. Since they have soy sauce in them, they almost always have gluten in them.

 

And then I bought an "all purpose gluten free flour". Bob'd Red Mill is a good brand. You'll need it to thicken sauces etc.

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Our favorite cookbooks are GLUTEN FREE ON A SHOESTRING.

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Our favorite gluten-free cookbook is The Healthy Gluten Free Life.  I use it daily!  Very easy to read, pictures for every recipe, explanations of flours and other ingredients in the front of the book.  Really well done.  All recipes are gluten, dairy, soy, and egg free. 

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It hasn't come out yet, but I'm super excited for Gluten Free Girl Every Day. http://glutenfreegirl.com/2013/04/here-it-is/ That's her blog post talking about the book. Her blog is my favorite place to go when I need reassurance that everything will be okay and for ideas for great food.

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It hasn't come out yet, but I'm super excited for Gluten Free Girl Every Day. http://glutenfreegirl.com/2013/04/here-it-is/ That's her blog post talking about the book. Her blog is my favorite place to go when I need reassurance that everything will be okay and for ideas for great food.

I've tested some recipes from her new book (I am a recipe tester) and have her other book.  Her recipes are usually reliable but some need tweaking.  One bread one I made the other day was less than stellar but others are incredible.  I use her homemade pasta recipes with success.  Her chocolate chip cookies are the best I have ever had.  Ever.  Including those containing gluten.  I have requests for them from many people and often!

 

The Gluten Free Goddess is another of my favourites for successful no fail but delicious recipes. 

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Easy Indian recipes that can easily be converted to gluten free:

http://www.foodandwine.com/slideshows/easy-indian?xid=DISH041913EasyIndianRecipes

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