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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.
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Am I Being Hypochodriac?
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OK, so I have palmoplantar pustular psoriasis. It is about gone on my hands and my feet were almost completely healed too. After the cookie crumb incident two or three months ago, my feet got bad again. They haven't healed yet but that's not unusual. The feet take a LOT longer to heal anyway.

 

But here's the thing: there are no whitehead pimple-looking pustules like there usually are. Instead there are little red dots. And they itch. My psoriasis hardly ever itched. And when I scratch it, my fingers are wet. That never happened before. The skin also itches outside of the rash area.

 

I know DH will present on both feet if it really is DH, but my psoriasis patches were/are on both feet anyway. The itching isn't constant, but several times a day (and at night) it'll get to itching so bad I just have to scratch it.

 

So I guess what I'm asking is, has anyone else had DH show up on TOP of psoriasis? And has anyone else had it show up a couple of weeks after a glutening? (This has been going on for a while now.)

 

Please tell me my worst gluten nightmare hasn't come true! And if it has, why is it still going on and even getting worse? I don't salt my food, I haven't eaten an egg in two weeks, and I know I haven't been glutened again.

 

Maybe it's just a new type of psoriasis?

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Did you try or come into contact with anything new?

 

It is certainly possible, however, I would look into anything you might have come into contact with. To my understanding, DH is constantly itchy.

 

Another thought would be a heat rash of sorts.

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Nothing new, Shadow. Same soap, same socks and shoes, no new food items. I went looking at the DH photo bank pictures and my red dots look sort of like some of them but it's hard to tell because they are on top of the red patches from the psoriasis. Where it itches outside of that area there are a couple of red dots too. Not a thing on my hands, which used to become so sore from the psoriasis.

 

What made me first think of DH was the itchiness, and especially the wetness. I will look at the spots through a magnifying glass later to see if there are actual  blisters.

 

It could very well be something else. Probably IS something else. I just know it is not my usual psoriasis. I have lived with that for years and it didn't itch except on very rare occasions (maybe once every week or two it would be a little itchy for a few minutes). And it never ever made my fingertips wet.

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It might be time to head to a dermatologist.  It could even be a third type of problem  -- skin stuff is very difficult to tell apart.

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How is that rash doing now bartful?

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Itchy with little red spots overlaid on the red area from the psoriasis. My fingers still get wet when I scratch. And there are still some red spots on the clear skin around the psoriasis patch. Those seem to itch more than the others. They seem to be working their way up toward my ankle. That's one of the reasons I know it's not psoriasis. My psoriasis is on the bottoms of my feet and sides of my heels.

 

My jaw (probably unrelated) is acting up again too. I can't get my mouth open, not even enough for rice. All I have eaten in the past two days is organic yogurt. (Even THAT gets all over my lips. GRRR...) I'm sure that there must be iodine in the whole milk they make it with.

 

I'll try to get a picture next time someone with a camera is in.

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My DH would swell and pop at night, and itch at night and in the morning. Ice helped calm it.

That said, in the very beginning I had one spot on one quad. Took a while for it to become bilateral.

Iodine is found everywhere. Egg yolks, potatoes, asparagus, and anything with carageenan got me. A little milk/butter not so much. It was cumulative.

Try ice, it stops the itching and reduces swelling. I sincerely hope it isn't DH.

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Regular potatoes are okay as long as you peel them as the iodine is in the skin but do not use red potatoes; just use regular old potatoes. Egg whites are fine but not the yolks. Spinach, turnip greens or the like, kidney beans, navy beans, lima beans, water chestnuts, raisins & seafood are on the no-no list as well as the asparagus Prickly mentioned. And of course all dairy is high in iodine.

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I had raisins last week and DH is flaring now.  I also felt glutened so not sure what got me exactly but whats in raisins that causes DH to flare?  Are grapes ok?

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Raisins are dried grapes. I remember reading on thyca when I first learned about the iodine connection that raisins were on the iodine no-no list. That would also put grapes on the no-no list. Guess what? Vino --- made from grapes.

The thing is that thyca changed their list & lots of thing I remember being on the no-no list are no longer specified on there. Somewhere -- can't remember specifically where, I also read that strawberries & watermelons are high iodine. Also somewhere I read peanuts are iodine & that would include peanut butter -- it said the iodine is in the peanut skins but they use the skins when making peanut butter. Sigh.

What other foods would you like to cross off your "allowed" list? Big sigh.

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I had raisins last week and DH is flaring now. I also felt glutened so not sure what got me exactly but whats in raisins that causes DH to flare? Are grapes ok?

We're they organic, free of sulphites (or sulfates or whatever they put on them to "preserve freshness")? Some people react to that stuff.

Or it could have been iodine.

For me, potatoes did it - even peeled. I think we all have our little buttons...and don't get me started on carageenan. Ugh.

Btw, I had a DH outbreak last week. Very very mild but I swear I almost had a panic attack. Felt like I was flipping it the bird every time I ate asparagus, potatoes, and cream cheese. Only thing that kept it in check was lack of antibodies. Bumps were minuscule compared to 2 years ago. Keep the faith, it will happen.

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Thanks for that hopeful news Prickly! :D

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Thanks Prickly. I'm tryin to keep the faith.  :)

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