• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Celiac.com E-Newsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsCeliac.com E-Newsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Traveling For Business To Seattle/bellevue (Suggestions)--Newly Diagnosed
0

11 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

alannakitty    0

Hi everyone!

 

I just joined.  I'm in the process of being diagnosed and after my last test I will be on the gluten-free diet/lifestyle. 

 

My question or my appeal for advice is that I will be traveling for business not even a month into my new lifestyle change and I'm afraid that going away on business will make what is already a hard task (finding things to eat that are safe/allowed) will be even harder.

 

Does anyone have any suggestions for flying/traveling gluten free?  I figured I can bring some snacks for the plane they are offering food service.  I also notified the hosts of the conference and they are aware of my special dietary needs for the few meals they will be providing. 

 

What do people suggest?  I just read that carrying a card with what I'm "allergic" to is helpful (different forum).  I feel like when I ask people about food prep and other things they look at me like I've grown two heads even if they are like ... ah, yeah gluten free. 

 

Thanks in advance!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


ryann14    1

Ask questions, talk to managers, if you have a smart phone or use of a computer use the application or website find me gluten free. I don't live in Washington but when I do travel then I bring snacks and go to to the grocery store and buy food I can make in the hotel. Good luck! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi everyone!

 

I just joined.  I'm in the process of being diagnosed and after my last test I will be on the gluten-free diet/lifestyle. 

 

My question or my appeal for advice is that I will be traveling for business not even a month into my new lifestyle change and I'm afraid that going away on business will make what is already a hard task (finding things to eat that are safe/allowed) will be even harder.

 

Does anyone have any suggestions for flying/traveling gluten free?  I figured I can bring some snacks for the plane they are offering food service.  I also notified the hosts of the conference and they are aware of my special dietary needs for the few meals they will be providing. 

 

What do people suggest?  I just read that carrying a card with what I'm "allergic" to is helpful (different forum).  I feel like when I ask people about food prep and other things they look at me like I've grown two heads even if they are like ... ah, yeah gluten free. 

 

Thanks in advance!

No need to worry if you are prepared, it takes some planning and knowledge (comes with time and experience) as it will not be as easy as before going gluten free. It also depends on your comfort level of eating out. When I travel I carry safe gluten free food with me on my carry on (Laura bars, almonds...etc and twice as much as I'll need just in case there is a delay). I will book hotels that I will have access to a microwave and fridge (either a room with a kitchenette or a hotel that will deliver a small fridge and microwave to the room). I look for a wholefoods (usually book a hotel near one) and swing by a get food for my stay.  Note: you can find gluten-free food at almost all stores now (not a huge variety,but it is getting better)...I just prefer wholefoods.

 

Another very helpful thing to do is contact the local GIG/Celiac support group prior to going, so you are armed with information from people that know the gluten free diet and the local area. Most if not all are more than willing to help a fellow Celiac/GInC. Awesome folks.

 

Contact me if you ever travel to the Twin Cities and I'll give you a list places to eat and where to get gluten-free food.

 

Cheers and goodluck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cyclinglady    723

All excellent suggestions!  I would just add that if your hotel offers a buffet type breakfast, talk to the people who actually prepares your food.  More than likely, they'll accommodate you. Lots of them use prepackaged foods and will even show you the box.  Other's will cook your eggs on a separate grille.  For business we (both hubby and I are gluten-free) book rooms with refrigerators and we grocery shop upon arrival.  Google for gluten-free restaurants in advance.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tarnalberry    314

How long is your flight? Where are you staying? I live immediately south of Bellevue (as in, the city border is across the street), and there is a lot of gluten-free friendly stuff in the area. (More in Seattle, but you didn't specify where you are staying...)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


notme45    2

Here is my advice:

 

1.  Get the "Find Me gluten-free" app for your smartphone.  If you don't have a smartphone then buy a smart phone.  The app will help you find gluten free restaurants and grocery stores that sell gluten free products.  I will make a big difference in your life when you travel.

 

2.  Plan in advance where you will buy food at and bring food with you.  On my last trip I had a frozen loaf of bread in my luggage (I like Canyon Bakehouse bread) and when I landed I went to a deli and bought lunch meat.  Lunch meat is almost always gluten free. 

 

3.  In general, the nicer the restaurant is the more accomodating they will be. 

 

4.  If you are going to a restaurant, try to call in advance and ask questions. 

 

5.  Your best bet is usually to order a steak with NO seasonings other than salt and pepper and no sauce.  Other good option is roasted chicken.   

 

6.  GoPicnic is a brand of boxed snacks that requires no refrigeration. You can buy these at Target, Amazon, or Sprouts (if you have Sprouts near you).  GoPicnic is good for plane rides and as an emergency meal. 

 

7.  Subscribe to Gluten Free Living

 

8.  Traveling with Celiac Disease is a bit of a pain but is not the end of the world as long as you plan ahead.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tim-n-VA    0

I will have a lengthy layover at the Seattle airport in late October.  Allowing for a comfortable cushion on travel by the light rail, I could have 3-4 hours.  Any suggestions for lunch in the downtown area?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


Jestgar    715

What do you like to eat?

 

Greenleaf in the ID is awesome.

 

Ivar's is good.  Really good if you hit happy hour

 

Most places are really aware of what they serve and I've never had a problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tim-n-VA    0

Moderately adventurous: Something either uniquely Pacific NW or something not readily available gluten free. For the latter, I saw "biscuit b%$@#" online.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jestgar    715

If you are traveling with someone else, the Crabpot is fun.  You get a pile of steamed seafood, corn and potatoes dumped on your table.  Just ask them to skip the bread that comes with the meal.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


Salax    34

There is a PF Changs downtown, a place (I think it's called something cinnamon?) in pike's that has amazing baked goodies (if they are still there, been awhile since I was there in 2011), try the gluten free registry website, found most places on that site. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      107,913
    • Total Posts
      938,658
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      65,840
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    Scott Nelson
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Yeah been there, done that, I have broken down to learning to how to cook acorns even, fall I steal pumpkins from the city decorations after halloween so I can eat the seeds and sell the meat in baked goods at the markets. I sometimes used to take produce from the grocery stores. Note you can sometimes talk with a manager and haggle on damaged produce they would toss.  I do not do steal them anymore, my family now offers to support me more now days, and the farmers market and bakery sales keep it where I can just afford food.

           It is  risky state, you have to MAKE sure you eating plenty of fat and protein. Otherwise your body eats itself, as the next best source for fats and protein is the stuff stored on your body as the fat and muscles your have. I live this way myself bit more mild since I can not eat meats. But I eat plenty of egg whites, nuts, seeds, and leafy greens. I literally eat every 4-5 hours at least a protein shake to prevent my body from turning on itself. You can actually body build in ketososis. You just need to really load on the fats and protein, it makes for a LEAN and slow building process....not as easy as carb bulking but my only choice due to my ulcerative colitis having carb, and sugar triggers.

          I am allergic to corn and break out in a rash from it....my mother is hispanic and well you see where that goes, I recall about a year ago she hugged and kissed me on the cheek....well she had eaten something with corn or drank a soda cause I ended up with a red rash in a lip imprint on my cheek bit amusing story for you.   I did a post earlier about where to bulk buy foil sheets, and freezer paper online from my supplier for my bakery I will update this later today with links for you. Buy in industrial rolls and they last you 4-6months
       
    • FYI newly diagnosed should not have oats right away. 
    • You may want to ask your doctor for a celiac panel. That would be a good start. The biopsy needs to be done next to an active lesion and they need to be looking for DH.  Unfortunately it can take a while for DH to be diagnosed because many doctors are not very knowledgeable in the skin form of celiac. Keep eating gluten until all celiac related testing is done. Then you can try the diet if the doctors haven't been able to figure things out or won't test properly.  It can take some time for DH to resolve so you might not notice a difference right away and folks with DH tend to be very sensitive to even small amounts of gluten so you must be very strict. Hope you get some relief soon as I know how miserable the rash can be.
    • Take the opportunity to get healthy!    Nuts, seeds, fruits, take these as snacks on your drive. I personally love almonds and pumpkin seeds. Or bananas and blueberries. Or if you need protein there's lots of gluten free protein bars at gas stations. I like to pack hard boiled eggs too.  One thing I do for long trips is I make sort of a granola/protein bar at home and take it with me.    1 cup oats 3 eggs two spoonfuls of peanut butter some cinnamon and a banana.   mash it all together and bake it like a cake for about 20 minutes. Chop em up into little bars and bag em for your trip. just get creative and try new things! 
    • I totally understand.    Ive noticed the same thing when I started really ramping up my fitness program.    To start, cut out the 30 day challenges. If your serious about fitness, you will incorporate it as a normal entity of life. We already have compromised immune systems so putting sudden outbursts (or challenges) of stress on it will only make you more susceptible to pathogens and ultimately, get you sick.    Take a week, only stretch, light cardio, very light strength training, and lots of rest. Next week, add a little more. Show your body that you can handle it, but do it push it by any means. This new training regime is forever, it's your lifestyle. Take it easy, and play it smart. Slowly add more intense training over time... slowly. Get to a point where you feel your nutrition and fitness needs are being satisfied, and you're productively making differences.   i personally work out 3-4 days a week. But if I go too hard, I get sick. Then I get frustrated that I can't exercise, I work out anyway, and get even more sick. It's just not smart. So I stopped that. I have respect for my immune system and its limits. I took it very slow, and increased my intensity over time. Now I'm at that golden point in my life where everything is balanced. Progress (in terms of personal aesthetics for myself and my interests) is slow, but it's progress. And it's a hell of a lot better than the go hard and get sick cycle.   Best of luck to you friend! I'm sure you will find your way! Learn your body. Know that you are strong, you are powerful, you just have to play it smart. 
  • Upcoming Events