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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Fasting After A Glutening? Pros And Cons?
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Hello All,

I have read some conflicting information on fasting, but the bits and pieces I've come across have been about rotational diets, which some discouraged for newbies.

 

I'm wondering if any of you fast after a glutening, either because that feels best or because  you've been advised to by a doctor.  I've been gluten-free for 9 months and accidentally glutened myself yesterday (SOOOooooo mad at myself).  Up until this point, my glutenings (which have been mostly cross contamination) have included an initial reaction and then I steadily got better.  Today I felt as though I got progressively worse- I might as well have the flu with the added plus of stomach cramping.  The kicker is I felt GREAT yesterday.  I tried to eat some lunch and some soup just now, but it doesn't make me feel any better and I feel like I'm forcing it down.  Water feels good.  Maybe some juice...

 

On a completely different note, it seems as though my symptoms are evolving to include headache, muscle ache, and joint ache.  That's never been an issue before, even before I went gluten-free.  Every encounter is an adventure!

 

Your comments are appreciated!!!  I don't want to do anything harmful that will make me feel worse.  :wacko:

Shellie

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I have found that I get very severe pains in my stomach that are only alleviated by not letting it empty fully after a glutening. Eating very much also distresses me greatly. I simply graze lightly all day on whatever sounds or feels good, either physically or emotionally. Half an apple and a smidge of peanut butter, a teeny bowl of soup, sometimes just small glasses of milk, or my ultimate comfort food, mac & cheese. With food, I do whatever feels good for my body.

 

More importantly, drink water. Then drink more water. When you can't stand water any more, have more water. Most of us will get either C or D and either way water will help greatly.

 

It is normal for symptoms to get worse with time, your body now is used to being free of gluten and can overreact in a whole new way. All you can do is wait for it to pass and treat yourself with TLC. I wouldn't fast, which is a personal choice, but if eating is making you physically ill a day off probably won't be the end of the world. Just don't let up on the liquids to get all that evilness flushed out of you.

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I have found that I get very severe pains in my stomach that are only alleviated by not letting it empty fully after a glutening. Eating very much also distresses me greatly. I simply graze lightly all day on whatever sounds or feels good, either physically or emotionally. Half an apple and a smidge of peanut butter, a teeny bowl of soup, sometimes just small glasses of milk, or my ultimate comfort food, mac & cheese. With food, I do whatever feels good for my body.

 

More importantly, drink water. Then drink more water. When you can't stand water any more, have more water. Most of us will get either C or D and either way water will help greatly.

 

It is normal for symptoms to get worse with time, your body now is used to being free of gluten and can overreact in a whole new way. All you can do is wait for it to pass and treat yourself with TLC. I wouldn't fast, which is a personal choice, but if eating is making you physically ill a day off probably won't be the end of the world. Just don't let up on the liquids to get all that evilness flushed out of you.

thanks Adalaide! evilness is the right would for it. ugh. I also have three swollen lymph nodes on my neck. Does that ever happen to you?

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I am not an alarmist but I had 2 swollen lymph nodes in my neck in 2007.   After testing and biopsy showing positive for NH Lymphoma.  I would recommend checking with your doctor. . . .  

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I am not an alarmist but I had 2 swollen lymph nodes in my neck in 2007.   After testing and biopsy showing positive for NH Lymphoma.  I would recommend checking with your doctor. . . .  

 

Thanks Lyn. I See my doc in a couple weeks and I'll be sure to let her know. I did just have a physical this month and all my bloodwork was normal. At that time, I had a swollen lymph node in arm pit (which I think also corresponds to a cross contamination issue).  I'm fairly certain it is connected to my reaction to gluten, and I'm hoping the swelling goes away in a few days as it did before. I'm not one to take chances,though, and I will certainly take your advice!

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Hi AS,

 

I think it is better to keep eating myself.  That way there is more good stuff in the gut to help thin out the bad stuff.  Lots of water is good too.  And some Pepto Bismol.

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 I agree with a light diet and lots of fluids. After a glutening it seems as if everything I eat has gluten...! It's really just that my GI tract is a mess. I will definitely eat less, smaller volume, and the most gentle food I can (unprocessed, non acidic, not spicy, no dairy). I try not to take anything but tylenol but if I have to work I will take pepto as well.

 

I also agree that the reactions seems stronger than when this mess all started !!! Way more sensitive...

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 I agree with a light diet and lots of fluids. After a glutening it seems as if everything I eat has gluten...! It's really just that my GI tract is a mess. I will definitely eat less, smaller volume, and the most gentle food I can (unprocessed, non acidic, not spicy, no dairy). I try not to take anything but tylenol but if I have to work I will take pepto as well.

 

I also agree that the reactions seems stronger than when this mess all started !!! Way more sensitive...

Thank you all for your replies.  I did eat lightly yesterday and I'm continuing today, although I still feel incredibly nauseous.   Lots of juice and tons of water.  I must have gotten up to pee 10 times last night!  The swelling in at least one lymph node has gone away today as well.  Man, I'm not used to this long of a reaction.  It takes endurance! 

 

I was wondering- when the small intestine is swollen, there's a higher chance of leaky gut, right?  Can eating then cause toxins to be released into the blood stream?  

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Hello All,

Just updating this post for anyone who may search it in the future.  Many times I read posts and wonder if they ever figured out what the issue was...

 

The shift in symptoms was actually a different issue- not from gluten.  The two issues just happened to coincide and who knows maybe the glutening triggered the other immune response.  Anyways, I was taking bactrim for a UTI after a round of cipro didn't work.  I was feeling great on the Bactrim for 5 days and it cleared all my UTI symptoms within a day or two.  After I had knowingly, stupidly glutened myself, the next morning I felt OK and had my usual breakfast.  It wasn't until lunch when I started feeling nauseous.  It did seem strange to me that I was feeling worse as the day went on, but I didn't think the med could give me those type of issues.  I had flu-like symptoms of headache, nausea, joint and muscle pains, and swollen lymph nodes- food didn't make sense to me and I didn't want it.  The next day I develop hives (hmmmmm).  Then I went to the Bactrim and low and behold all of that stuff was there.  Along with the hives came tongue swelling, which still hasn't completely subsided.  It's called a serum sickness reaction. Poor (yet still evil) gluten was blamed when it actually was a delayed allergic reaction to medication.

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thanks for the information, Anti-Soprano. Possibly your gut was frailer because of the glutening, though, and reacted to the med...

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