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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Is Wine gluten-free?
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38 posts in this topic

I thought wine was Gluten Free but now I'm starting to wonder....I drink White Zinfandel...has anyone ever had trouble with wine or does anyone know if that could effect your blood work levels????

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Kiki....wine is unequivocably gluten free.  This has been discussed many times previously on this forum and I can assure you....wine is gluten-free.  Some people may disagree but all the celiac organizations out there....the reputable ones, do not list wine on the forbidden lists and state wine is safe so go ahead and enjoy your Zinfandel.  It will not affect your blood work.  :)

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I assure you,  it is gluten free, otherwise I'd be dead by now.

 

Cheers!

 

drinking-wine-smiley-emoticon.gif

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Thank you both for responding!!! This makes me feel so much better!!!!  Now if I can figure out why my levels are so high I can fix it. Terrible feeling thinking that for the past 3 years you been eating right and all new dishes and they still tell you your doing it wrong :(

I am so thankful for this website you all on here are so helpful and caring..thanks again so much!

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Wine is gluten free, but that does not mean that your body can process it successfully. Some can, some can't.

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Kiki, there have definitely been a number of discussions regarding this on this forum.

I would recommend doing a search of the forum to read them and draw your own conclusions.

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Kiki, there have definitely been a number of discussions regarding this on this forum.

I would recommend doing a search of the forum to read them and draw your own conclusions.

 

:rolleyes:

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I drink wine and my repeat antibody tests are fine.  I would think that the major Celiac Centers and organizations would warn us if wine was not safe for Celiacs. 

 

 

 

 

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/archives/faq/can-someone-with-celiac-disease-drink-red-wine-ive-heard-that-some-manufacturers-seal-their-barrels-with-a-gluten-containing-ingredient

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A link about fining: http://www.ajevonline.org/content/53/4/308.abstract

 

Tricia Thompson's study showing negative tests with detection limits of 5 and 10 ppm of wine aged in oak barrels sealed with wheat paste: https://www.glutenfreewatchdog.org/blog.php?id=8

 

My experience is that it isn't a problem unless you are extremely sensitive.  As stated by others, I can't know for sure that any reaction I have is to gluten, just like anyone else here.  All I can know is that all those symptoms that went away when I got diagnosed and went gluten-free come back when I eat or drink certain things.

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I drink wine -- it is really my only indulgence -- I cannot drink white and some reds -- but it has nothing to do with gluten -- rather sulphites and histamine.

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I drink wine and my repeat antibody tests are fine.  I would think that the major Celiac Centers and organizations would warn us if wine was not safe for Celiacs. 

 

 

 

 

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/archives/faq/can-someone-with-celiac-disease-drink-red-wine-ive-heard-that-some-manufacturers-seal-their-barrels-with-a-gluten-containing-ingredient

Same here.  And I must admit, I drink a glass of wine every night with my dinner.  I love my red wine.  My antibody tests were pegged when I was diagnosed and my last one came in at a 1...which is as low as humanly possible to achieve. If there were any amount of gluten in wine, this would not be possible.

 

I answered your other post, Kiki, regarding your high levels.  It may not be your diet so make sure the doctor did the correct testing and go from there!

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Same here.  And I must admit, I drink a glass of wine every night with my dinner.  I love my red wine.  My antibody tests were pegged when I was diagnosed and my last one came in at a 1...which is as low as humanly possible to achieve. If there were any amount of gluten in wine, this would not be possible.

 

I answered your other post, Kiki, regarding your high levels.  It may not be your diet so make sure the doctor did the correct testing and go from there!

Thank you all for your help and I do a lot of research on this site but it is helpful when you really get to talk to people who are going through what you are so thanks!

And Gemini I will check out the testing part also!

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I used to always drink arbor mist strawberry wine. After cutting out gluten I found I felt like I was hit by a truck the morning following arbor mist, my stomach hurt and I was in the bathroom often. I switched to "real" wine at the advice of the owner of the liquor store and I have felt much better. That being said some of the white wines still made me feel  really foggy the next day, others don't. I don't know if this lend credence to the how they are stored theory? but i would stick with pure wines (beware "wine drinks" coolers etc), and keep track of any brand that caused you to feel glutened. I'm not an expert on liquor I barely know what half the things are in the store but the owner seemed to have a lot of gluten-free customers and said many report getting sick with certain wines or "wine like drinks" (he said anything made in a day and not aged isn't wine haha referring to my arbor mist question) and he saw some consistency in the complaints of real wines making him wonder if some have contamination issues.  

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I thought wine was Gluten Free but now I'm starting to wonder....I drink White Zinfandel...has anyone ever had trouble with wine or does anyone know if that could effect your blood work levels????

Wine is gluten-free.
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Some think many wines have gluten; if so, please note each batch of wine may vary in ppm. You can contact the manufacturer, or run your own elisa test. http://www.drvino.com/2011/11/30/gluten-free-wine/

This standard of 20 ppm of gluten as not showing symptoms of damage: is there really a safe limit, now that we know of the extent of neurologic and other "hidden" or "slowly accreting" health problems? Has anyone actually experimented with a product certified 20 ppm, and if so, what happened? 100 ppm?

Hmmm...you know, if you folks who drink wine got together, you could do your own label of gluten free wine, called "celiac.com's finest".

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Some think many wines have gluten; if so, please note each batch of wine may vary in ppm. You can contact the manufacturer, or run your own elisa test. http://www.drvino.com/2011/11/30/gluten-free-wine/This standard of 20 ppm of gluten as not showing symptoms of damage: is there really a safe limit, now that we know of the extent of neurologic and other "hidden" or "slowly accreting" health problems? Has anyone actually experimented with a product certified 20 ppm, and if so, what happened? 100 ppm?Hmmm...you know, if you folks who drink wine got together, you could do your own label of gluten free wine, called "celiac.com's finest".

Once again...your " proof" contradicts you. Your article says " But the chances are pretty slim that any wines actually contain gluten. "

I really don't understand you odd comment about 20 ppm. Just because a product is tested using the test " less than 20 ppm" , that does not mean it has 20 ppm or 19 or 6. It could have 0. Many of the certified gluten-free products are certified at 20, some at 10. Once again, that does not mean they are saying it has 20 ppm. They tested for less than 20 ppm.

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I am not much of a drinker, sometimes a beer would do me good! But since I have been DX'd, I have had a few glasses of wine. I cannot tolerate the high alcohol levels of some wines!! I didn't even know wine had a high level of alcohol in it!! So now I look at high alcohol levels and if my friends or family offer me wine I look to see alcohol level and I either will put in in a tall galss filled with ice or I mix it with pop or sparkling water or something. Sparkling water is good if it doesn't have artificial sweetener in it (I am allergic to it) Who knew? It tasted good with wine .... So I rarely have a drink of wine either , sometimes it's just not worth the fuss!! In fact someone mentioned wine spritzers , thats what gave me the idea... They are good if you find the right mix!! :) 

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Some think many wines have gluten; if so, please note each batch of wine may vary in ppm. You can contact the manufacturer, or run your own elisa test. http://www.drvino.com/2011/11/30/gluten-free-wine/

This standard of 20 ppm of gluten as not showing symptoms of damage: is there really a safe limit, now that we know of the extent of neurologic and other "hidden" or "slowly accreting" health problems? Has anyone actually experimented with a product certified 20 ppm, and if so, what happened? 100 ppm?

Hmmm...you know, if you folks who drink wine got together, you could do your own label of gluten free wine, called "celiac.com's finest".

 

It is thought that a gluten reaction comes from a certain amount of daily intake and not a certain concentration.  There have been studies done on this.  This is an FDA review of the studies which is long: http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Food/FoodScienceResearch/UCM264152.pdf

 

 

This is the most often cited one from which the 20 ppm safe limit came. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17209192

 

You will see that sensitivity levels vary and while 20 ppm is considered safe for most celiacs, it is not for all.  Some with ongoing symptoms require a gluten contamination free diet: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-230X/13/40

 

This doesn't have so much to do with the wine gluten-free issue, I'm addressing the question in that previous post.  You can note that alcoholic beverages are not allowed in the gluten contamination free diet.

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This doesn't have so much to do with the wine gluten-free issue, I'm addressing the question in that previous post.  You can note that alcoholic beverages are not allowed in the gluten contamination free diet.

 

I have a very limited whole food diet and safely consume Red Wine often.  My intestines are finally healing according to my repeat biopsies -- there is no gluten in the wine I am drinking -- If I were offered a fine very old vintage -- I might question what it was contained in originally, but newer/mass produced wines are not held in containers with or strained through any gluten.

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.  You can note that alcoholic beverages are not allowed in the gluten contamination free diet.

 

 

Not surprising that alcohol is not allowed in a restrictive diet meant to help people heal from an ailment.  That is just normal for many of those type of diets.

Edited by kareng
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The study which cites the 20 ppm issue makes no sense because many of the people in the study were able to resume a normal gluten-free diet with no recurrance of symptoms.  Most people, when diagnosed, follow a pretty spartan, whole foods diet and go on to add many more foods back in as they recover.  After 8 years gluten-free, I am amazed at how many more foods I can tolerate well and I am extremely sensitive to small amounts also but don't label myself with the super sensitive label.  There has been no proof that any of these questionable foods (processed) have any trace amount of gluten in them because of current testing methods. So making that assumption is a leap. 

 

If you go through life fearing that all the food out there is contaminated, that mindset in itself could interfere with your ability to heal well and will make for a pretty spartan food experience.

Celiacs often have so many other issues and couple that with long healing times for many of us, can go a long way to making people feel nothing is safe to eat.  That's when you need to rely on established organizations that will publish safe and non-safe food lists.  Wine has never been listed on any unsafe food list that I have seen in 8 years. Wine is routinely consumed by the vast majority of Celiacs with no problem.  However, as wine can be an irritant to the stomach because of it's alcohol content, there will be those who just cannot tolerate it in the beginning or never. That does not mean there is gluten in the wine.

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I agree with Gemini really sounds so true!! Ilike the last paragraph!! :) 

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Not surprising that alcohol is not allowed in a restrictive diet meant to help people heal from an ailment.  That is just normal for many of those type of diets.

 

I agree.  Alcohol consumption is not the best thing when you are sick.  Thank you for being more clear.

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Taken from the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity winter 2013 issue:

 

Wine that is aged in oak

barrels contains less gluten than we

are currently capable of testing for,

whether hydrolyzed or not.

At this point, a lot of people will

begin to shake their heads: “If wine

is gluten-free, then why do I get sick

when I drink __________ wine?” The

likely answer is that you are reacting

to something else! Many winemakers

use egg whites as a clarifying agent.

The amount of egg used is far more

substantial than any wheat paste that

might have leaked into the wine, so if

you know eggs are a problem, this is

likely what you are reacting to.

 

 

Wine is safe.  If you are drinking coolers check the ingredients!

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Taken from the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity winter 2013 issue:

 

Wine that is aged in oak

barrels contains less gluten than we

are currently capable of testing for,

whether hydrolyzed or not.

At this point, a lot of people will

begin to shake their heads: “If wine

is gluten-free, then why do I get sick

when I drink __________ wine?” The

likely answer is that you are reacting

to something else! Many winemakers

use egg whites as a clarifying agent.

The amount of egg used is far more

substantial than any wheat paste that

might have leaked into the wine, so if

you know eggs are a problem, this is

likely what you are reacting to.

 

 

Wine is safe.  If you are drinking coolers check the ingredients!

 

Thank you for sharing this. :)  This is a recurring question/concern.  C :) heers!

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