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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Concerns With Going Gluten-Free?
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14 posts in this topic

I would love to hear your responses to the following question. 

Question:
What  have been your biggest questions, challenges or concerns with going gluten-free?

Thanks all for your insight!!!

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Cross contamination. Eating in restaurants. That's all I can think of right now.

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How in the world I'm going to keep gluten away from my 6 year old celiac who's friends with all the neighbors that all seem to like to feed him random crap! And I'm talking both kids and adults. I'm hoping the adults understand (and so far most of them are) but kids....well....they're kids.

Also...how in the world we're going to afford to eat like this.

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At first it was a bit of a panic as I went through out pantry and tossed or gave away about a quarter of it. So many fast dishes were gone like pork chops with a mushroom soup gravy. I have one picky son who loves chicken nuggets. i had to figure out new ways to cook all of those things... I think the need and anticipation of doing new things was much worse than actually doing it.  Homemade gravy is tastier (and I have found gluten-free mushroom soup) and the chicken nuggets I make are probably healthier that those that come in a box.

 

So, at first I would say the hardest part was facing the change.

 

Now the only thing that bugs me is the hassle of packing extra food when ever we go out to eat at friends' houses. I have to bring an appetizer so my kids and I can fill up if it looks like our menu will be limited, I often bring gluten-free buns so the kids can have those 9buns are s often served) and I always bring a dessert because no one knows how to bake gluten-free.  LOL  It's also a hassle to pack food for errands knowing that we can't stop off in a fast food store.

 

Overall, the changes are for the best. knowing that we are all healthier now makes it easier to put in the extra effort.

 

Mommy2krj - I have three gluten-free kids (ages 5-10) who live on a street of two dozen kids. Keeping them gluten-free can be done. I talked with all of the parents and asked they not give the kids food unless I give the okay; they all seem to respect that. My kids know the rule too, although I worry a bit about my oldest in case he wants to be "cool" and eat junk with the rest.  I compensate by having lots of snacks around so I can feed the neighbourhood. Peanuts, fruit smoothies, watermelon or freezies are the norm.

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At first it was a bit of a panic as I went through out pantry and tossed or gave away about a quarter of it. So many fast dishes were gone like pork chops with a mushroom soup gravy. I have one picky son who loves chicken nuggets. i had to figure out new ways to cook all of those things... I think the need and anticipation of doing new things was much worse than actually doing it.  Homemade gravy is tastier (and I have found gluten-free mushroom soup) and the chicken nuggets I make are probably healthier that those that come in a box.

 

So, at first I would say the hardest part was facing the change.

 

Now the only thing that bugs me is the hassle of packing extra food when ever we go out to eat at friends' houses. I have to bring an appetizer so my kids and I can fill up if it looks like our menu will be limited, I often bring gluten-free buns so the kids can have those 9buns are s often served) and I always bring a dessert because no one knows how to bake gluten-free.  LOL  It's also a hassle to pack food for errands knowing that we can't stop off in a fast food store.

 

Overall, the changes are for the best. knowing that we are all healthier now makes it easier to put in the extra effort.

 

Mommy2krj - I have three gluten-free kids (ages 5-10) who live on a street of two dozen kids. Keeping them gluten-free can be done. I talked with all of the parents and asked they not give the kids food unless I give the okay; they all seem to respect that. My kids know the rule too, although I worry a bit about my oldest in case he wants to be "cool" and eat junk with the rest.  I compensate by having lots of snacks around so I can feed the neighbourhood. Peanuts, fruit smoothies, watermelon or freezies are the norm.

Thanks...it helps to have someone who gets that part. :) I'm slowly talking to all the neighbors and all the kids too....there's just one kid that worries me as he is constantly sneaking food out of his house! He'll bring out a whole container of something that was just bought at the store and feed all the kids in the neighborhood with it. Oy. His parents don't seem to care as I've said something to them before....they yell at him and nothing else so he just does it again the next day. *sigh*

I do plan on learning to make some decent snacks from scratch because with the prices of the gluten free snacks....well....we're not sharing that with anyone on a regular basis! It would cost a fortune!!! So we'll stick to the whole food snacks and keep lots of fruit around. :)

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NVSMOM

 

Can you tell us the brand of gluten-free mushroom soup?

 

MOMMY2KRJ,

 

Eating out and going to someone's house for a get together are the toughest, but can be managed.

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NVSMOM

 

Can you tell us the brand of gluten-free mushroom soup?.

It is called Pacific Natural Foods, Organic Cream of Mushroom Condensed Soup. It comes in a small brown/beige carton that is shorter than the typical soup can. It is expensive but I like to have it on and for quick meals in a pinch.

I found it in the natural foods section at Superstore - this is in Canada.

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Thanks for all the great replies.  Going gluten-free is a challenge but definitely worth it!

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It is called Pacific Natural Foods, Organic Cream of Mushroom Condensed Soup. It comes in a small brown/beige carton that is shorter than the typical soup can. It is expensive but I like to have it on and for quick meals in a pinch.

I found it in the natural foods section at Superstore - this is in Canada.

 

You can also make a white sauce (milk (or sub) butter and cornstartch) and add chopped mushrooms for a quick sauce. It freezes just fine too. Add salt and pepper too. Takes about 10 minutes. Skip the mushrooms and add cheese. The options are endless to a basic white sauce.

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How in the world I'm going to keep gluten away from my 6 year old celiac who's friends with all the neighbors that all seem to like to feed him random crap! And I'm talking both kids and adults. I'm hoping the adults understand (and so far most of them are) but kids....well....they're kids.

Also...how in the world we're going to afford to eat like this.

Going gluten-free is tough especially with kids because of the social pressures.  How do you handle this with your child?  Any tips for helping young children to understand that gluten is not good for them?  Thanks for your insight, greatly appreciated!  

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Facing it was toughest. It's a major life change and for me (and probably for many of you too) it was extremely daunting.

 

Then came cleaning out the pantry. It was a sort of funeral for the things I loved and couldn't have anymore.

 

I thought summer bbq's would be difficult, but now I just ask my host to please cook my food on a piece of tin foil on the grill (less chance of cc that way.) And I bring my own dessert.

 

Eating out - well - I only have a list of 5 places right now where I feel safe and comfortable. I haven't traveled yet, but will be traveling this month, so we'll see how that goes. I plan to bring A LOT of food/snacks with me.

 

Hang in there. It will get easier.

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At first it was a bit of a panic as I went through out pantry and tossed or gave away about a quarter of it. So many fast dishes were gone like pork chops with a mushroom soup gravy. I have one picky son who loves chicken nuggets. i had to figure out new ways to cook all of those things... I think the need and anticipation of doing new things was much worse than actually doing it.  Homemade gravy is tastier (and I have found gluten-free mushroom soup) and the chicken nuggets I make are probably healthier that those that come in a box.

 

So, at first I would say the hardest part was facing the change.

 

Now the only thing that bugs me is the hassle of packing extra food when ever we go out to eat at friends' houses. I have to bring an appetizer so my kids and I can fill up if it looks like our menu will be limited, I often bring gluten-free buns so the kids can have those 9buns are s often served) and I always bring a dessert because no one knows how to bake gluten-free.  LOL  It's also a hassle to pack food for errands knowing that we can't stop off in a fast food store.

 

Overall, the changes are for the best. knowing that we are all healthier now makes it easier to put in the extra effort.

 

Mommy2krj - I have three gluten-free kids (ages 5-10) who live on a street of two dozen kids. Keeping them gluten-free can be done. I talked with all of the parents and asked they not give the kids food unless I give the okay; they all seem to respect that. My kids know the rule too, although I worry a bit about my oldest in case he wants to be "cool" and eat junk with the rest.  I compensate by having lots of snacks around so I can feed the neighbourhood. Peanuts, fruit smoothies, watermelon or freezies are the norm.

Thanks for the inspiration!  Great to know that it can be done with a little effort :)!

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Dealing with the DX. Trying to figure out make up, lotions, shampoos. Feeling socially left out and feeling deprived. Wondering if I'll ever be pain free?

 

Just to name a few.

 

Now, 3 years in, cross contamination, eating out, and trying to figure out if I need to quit my job.  I'm around gluten and my allergy foods way too much. .

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I would love to hear your responses to the following question. 

Question:

What  have been your biggest questions, challenges or concerns with going gluten-free?

Thanks all for your insight!!!

 

 

My biggest challenges and concerns are being careful to not contaminate my wife. I do not have celiac and we are not a 100% gluten free house so I need to be very careful on what I use and where and to be sure to clean up my mess when done.

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