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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Yeast For Bread Baking
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5 posts in this topic

The bread recipe calls for 1 Tablespoon of yeast. It does not give any advice about how to use the yeast. Do I just throw the yeast in dry? Or do I proof it first.

Any answers

Thank you

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bread machine?

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What type of bread and what type of yeast? Active dry, fast acting...?

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I always proof my yeast and that's because 1) I buy it in bulk and keep it after it "expires" and 2) I don't want to waste ingredients if the yeast is bad. To proof, just add the yeast to part of the water/milk that the recipe calls for.  For example, if the recipe calls for 1 cup of warm water, I add the yeast to just 1/4 cup of warm water (glass) and a smidge of sugar (to feed the yeast).  Stir with a wooden gluten-free spoon and wait five minutes or so.  The yeast should start to bubble up and if you let it sit a little longer, it will foam up.  Then add in the balance of the water/milk the recipe requires.  If bubbling doesn't occur, the yeast is old.  

 

Unless you're using a bread machine and are setting it up for an overnight baking, I wouldn't add the yeast right into the flour unless you know the  yeast is good (it lasts over a year in the frig in a sealed container) --  especially since gluten-free flours are more expensive.  

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Post the recipe and we'll have a better idea.  I know many older recipes put the yeast in with the dry ingredients, which works most of the time, but as the other posters noted, if you're not sure of your yeast's age it doesn't hurt to proof it and add it in with the wet ingredients.  Saves ending up with a squat dense loaf because the yeast was pooped out.

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