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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Rapid Weight Loss
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16 posts in this topic

Hey everyone, as I am very sure, many others have this issue, so you are probably thinking, why are you re-posting instead of following other posts made towards this issue. My answer, maybe i am looking for some kind of personal relief, something that pertains to me and my problem with advice given to me rather than someone else without my exact body type. OKAY so, I am 21 years old, 5' 8'' and i have been diagnosed with celiacs disease two weeks ago and began my gluten free journy at that point with no exception. Something to know about me, i am very athletic, i play sports and stay active, and i am extremely into working out. As of two weeks ago i was up to 165lbs, as of now (two weeks later) i am down to 135 lbs. This for me is extremely demoralizing and between you guys and me, it's ripping me apart.... everything i've worked for is rapidly dissapearing before my eyes to the point i'm nearly in tears. I just don't know what to do anymore.

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Slow down...Breathe...

Ok...now to help people understand:

Are you male or female? You lost 30 pounds in 2 weeks?

Editing to add: what are you eating? How were you diagnosed?

Edited by kareng
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sorry, I am male. and yes that is correct.

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Ok , i only have like 5 posts, and ive used two, but I was diagnosed after getting tests done at the doctors, and i'm eating only things off the gluten free sections in grocery stores, i do not eat anything other than gluten free items.

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Congratulations on getting a diagnosis. I say that because I so wish I had figured this whole thing out 20 years sooner.

I had plenty of weight loss issues, but they did improve when I wasn't eating gluten. It sounds as if you have a great motivator for staying gluten free so I'd also see this as a positive.

I'd get tested for vitamin deficiencies due to the obvious malabsorption issues as some can't be fixed with just a multivitamins or by eating the proper foods because of damage that is still in the process of healing.

Otherwise, I would probably consider modifying your work-out routine for these first few months so that you're not overtaxing your body as it is trying to heal, then slowly work back up to the higher levels again.

And already finding and using this forum is huge. I still learn things all of the time. You'll probably have all sorts of accidental glutenings in the beginning, but it does get a lot easier, especially if you take advantage of sources like this for less-well-known information.

And for phase two of your gluten-free life, I'd plan to get into the kitchen and cook more foods from scratch rather than relying on foods sold as gluten-free. They are really good at helping you to feel as if you're not deprived of anything in the beginning, but like any pre-made or processed foods, they generally aren't the best thing that you can be eating.

Speaking from experience, I can tell you that making a huge batch of potato salad with eggs, black olives, and spices, is a great way to tack on a pound or two. 

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It sounds like too much processed foods even if they are gluten free.    You need to eat whole foods (meat/fish, rice, potatoes, squash, veggies and fruits).   But it's hard for me to give sound advice when I don't enough information (like do you have access to a kitchen, etc.)

 

So, I'm an old lady and definitely not your body type.  But I'm probably in the top 1% of my age group in terms of fitness.  I'm a runner, cyclist and swimmer.  I work out six days a week.  Used to do triathalons, but I don't have the time to do them now (raising a family/working).  You know that you need lots of protein to keep fit.  If you cant' grill a steak, then open up a can of salmon (I eat that for breakfast since I'm egg intolerant).  Buy a roasted chicken at the supermarket (check the label to make sure there are no gluten ingredients), eat nuts, eat peanut butter!  

 

When I'm racing, I'm eating protein six times a day plus veggies (nuke a sweet potato).  Lots of fruit (bananas can be your best friend for energy and they travel so well!)  Take packages of Gu when you hit the gym and keep up on the Gatoraide to quench your thirst, keep your electrolytes in balance and easily absorbed calories.  Eat dried fruit.  Chocolate.  Humm....those chocolate covered coffee beans really give me a kick!)  Drink your chocolate milk (soymilk for me) for recovery.  

 

But, that said, you are recovering from Celiac and you need to stop and slow down (hard to do when you're 21).  It's just a little "blip" in your life and this time will pass.  Work out, but slow it down. Give yourself six months to heal.  You will get back to your old weight and strength soon.  Give your body and mind a chance to heal.  

 

Take care.

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You guys are amazing, I recently lost my medical insurance shortly after my diagnosis, so at this point in time im in this alone ( other than this forum ! =] ). After two of your posts I'm already feeling better and getting better ideas of what i need to be eating and something extremely important to me, what i need to be focusing on with getting back to my usual condition. I appriciate the help so far, I'm feeling better already. Just need to keep learning, and keep my head up until i can get everything figured out and until my body can get over celiac, considering i have no clue how long i've had it prior to diagnosis. As far as buying off the 2 ft x 2ft gluten free sections in stores, i think i'll dust off the chefs hat and see what i can brew up based on what you all tell me, and what i can find elsewhere in the forum. This website does amazing things and i am happy to have stumbled upon it.

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Another thought, I wouldn't underestimate just how far you have to go in order to actually be gluten free or the emotional strain getting a diagnosis has dumped on you, first not knowing what was causing problems, and now, starting to discover how much your life is going have to be modified going forward. Just the amount of learning that needs to be done in the first few weeks is pretty huge. But it does get easier once you've figured things out.

I had a friend who thought he was doing okay at being gluten free for years. In hindsight now that I know that I have a gluten problem too and have more knowledge, I realize that he wasn't gluten free at all, and probably still isn't. I'd watch him eat the hotdog out of the bun at ball games, and he didn't realize that all vodka wasn't made from potatoes! He still eats out regularly, and I know I've been glutened from the same meal that he ordered when he doesn't notice it. When I see him online in the middle of the night, unable to sleep, I have to wonder if he glutened himself again.

If you put in the time and effort up front to get really informed about cross contamination and hidden sources of gluten, you could save yourself a lot of hassle down the road and get back to the healthy form you desire. There is the newbie thread here on this forum, and I'd research hidden sources of gluten so that you don't get whalloped with them accidentally. Seek out the natural and organic grocery stores for more gluten-free options than what you can find in regular stores (they may even be able to order gluten-free beers for you).

Every accidental glutening often comes with days of recovery, so the better you are at avoiding them, the sooner you'll get back to top physical form.

And feel free to keep updating those profile pics with the topless shots. We women will appreciate it.

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This might be helpful

 

http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/91878-newbie-info-101/

 

 

 

Eating just processed and boxed foods isn't very healthy gluten free or not.  You can eat meat, dairy (if it agrees with you), rice, veggies (fresh, frozen or canned), fruits, beans, eggs, etc.  Just read the ingredients.  A plain frozen veggie probably doesn't have anything added - a "sauced one might have wheat. 

 

We have threads about what people eat for dinner, lunch and breakfast you might find helpful.

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Ditto what CyclingLady said. Less processed foods and a lot more protein, to help you build and sustain muscle. As you are gluten free longer, you'll realize just how many things you can eat, especially when you still to natural, fresh food, and you won't feel as tied to the official gluten free shelf. Most things that are one ingredient are naturally gluten free - which in addition to vegetables and fruits includes all types of fresh meat, seafood, poultry, eggs, nuts, and most cheeses. Just be careful of seemingly simple things that have undergone some processing, such as cured meats, beef jerky, packed lunch meat, fake crab, seasoned nuts, or anything that has been marinated. For building and maintaining muscle, I'm also a big fan of whey protein powder after workouts, and you may be able to find some gluten free version that also contains creatine if that's something you are interested in.

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I to have lost alot of weight! Most of it came off when I first got DX'd .. It is still coming off! I thought I was at a stand still but I know I am getting slimmer and slimmer!! I can tell by the clothes I am wearing.. Lets see a size 14 to a size 8 in 3 months one of my new pants are a size 6 but they are a lil tight!! . It is amazing to me specially because I know someone who was DX'd b4 me and they have gained weight!! But she was stick thin to begin with.  I don't know why some lose and some gain!! All I can say is I am eating natural foods 90 % of the time!! I am not eating very much boxed, bagged or frozen! Or processed not much anyway! And It is causing me to lose weight!! 

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You should look up Marksdailyapple.com and look into a Paleo/primal diet. Lots of Crossfit athletes over there doing that. You can still eat carbs, just make them whole foods from non gluten sources. And yes, you will need that chef's hat!

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Pauliewog is right!! Good call!! WTG!! 

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Alright mate, weve really similar stats and i also train 3x a week. i KNOW exactly how you feel takes me like 8 weeks to put 6lbs and thats a good 8 weeks then i get sick and just drop 5lbs. Inbox me if you need any help with gluten free supplements lik protein, creatiine etc. Also il put my diet below you should scrap the gluten free food for now and eat only the cleanest caveman food as you put it, From your pic you look good shape already which is good cause i work extra hard now to put on muscle and weight. I know losing that hard earn weight is the worst but alot is water weight and cutting time is easy :)

 

 

Meal 1

 

5 egg whites, gluten free oats, peanut butter

 

Meal 2

 

200g brown rice 120g salmon

 

Meal 3

 

200g brown rice 150g chicken fillet

 

Meal 4

 

Protein shake gluten free ofc

 

Meal 5

 

150g chicken fillet

 

Extras

 

Almonds, 1 apple, gallons of water

 

If you get reactions of this the problem isnt food

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When I first went gluten free I lost 20 lbs within a few weeks and was "skeletal" and "sick looking" as people told me but I felt great. Marksdailyapple is a great site to go to. Good, clean protein is essential so you don't lose too much muscle mass.

I would also second researching nutrient deficiencies this aided me greatly in recovering. I am back to my normal weight and find I no longer have the luxury of eating whatever and whenever I want as my food is actually being absorbed and my body acting properly. I had to (and still do at times) journal everything to see how my body reacts to what I am eating. But at the beginning I couldn't eat enough food to keep the weight from falling off. You're body will balance out once you get this sorted out. Good luck.

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Digestive enzymes. These will break down your food for you so your gut can absorb as much food as it possibly can. They sped up my recovery, and ability to excercise, very quickly.

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