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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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Laur2193

Newbie To Coeliac Disease - From England. Please Help!

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Hi everyone,

 

My name is Lauren, I'm 19 years old and I was just hoping for some help.

 

After 1.5 years of tests, new medications and hospital visits, I was finally diagnosed with coeliac disease in July of this year (2013). Since then, I'm been following a gluten free diet but I've been struggling with it. I have been trying out different brands of gluten free bread and even making my own and I still can't handle the taste of it. It's taking me some time to get used to a gluten free diet and it's getting me quite down because I don't know anyone with this condition and none of my friends even really understand it (my housemate - I live at uni, which also makes it hard. Student budget and all - has kindly offered to make me a gluten free cake for my birthday and my other housemate has offered to help me learn recipes which is VERY lovely of them!!) and I just need someone to talk to who has and understands the condition.

 

I am a member of Coeliac UK and have the food directory and a lot more information that comes with it - I was also given a lot from my dietician. It overwhelmed me quite a bit and going gluten free has been a huge change for me.

 

If anyone can help me or just talk about how they are managing with it and reassure me that it does get easier that will really be appreciated!

 

Thank you!
Lauren :)

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Hi Lauren.  Trust me when I say it gets much easier with time.  When I first tried gluten free bread I freaked out.  Then I just started with toast.  Now I don't even remember what the old stuff even tastes like.  It sounds like you have lots of good information and caring friends, that's half the battle.  You will find all kinds of additional information here as well as caring people who have walked in your shoes.

 

Ask if you have questions, rant if you need that too.  

 

Welcome to the Forum! 

 

Colleen 

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Hi Lauren....I am relatively new too. I felt much better after I gave up gluten, and now get really sick if I have any at all.   :(

I have found it easier to just do without bread...don't want the hassle of making gluten-free and expensive to buy. I like the corn tortilla shells, yellow and white, and use these for a sandwich wrap. I really freaked when I first went on the diet, thinking I can have nothing, but I realize now I can....I just have to think about it. Here is a good cookie recipe. I eat p-nut butter and celery a lot...it's good   :)

 

Claire Robinson's cookies: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/claire-robinson/flourless-peanut-butter-cookies-recipe/index.html?oc=linkback

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Hi Lauren.  Trust me when I say it gets much easier with time.  When I first tried gluten free bread I freaked out.  Then I just started with toast.  Now I don't even remember what the old stuff even tastes like.  It sounds like you have lots of good information and caring friends, that's half the battle.  You will find all kinds of additional information here as well as caring people who have walked in your shoes.

 

Ask if you have questions, rant if you need that too.  

 

Welcome to the Forum! 

 

Colleen 

Thank you Colleen! I'm going to go out and buy some bread today - it's expensive, especially on a student budget but if I freeze it and have a slice every now and then, I'll be fine. Did you get any cravings for the food you used to eat? 

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Hi Lauren....I am relatively new too. I felt much better after I gave up gluten, and now get really sick if I have any at all.   :(

I have found it easier to just do without bread...don't want the hassle of making gluten-free and expensive to buy. I like the corn tortilla shells, yellow and white, and use these for a sandwich wrap. I really freaked when I first went on the diet, thinking I can have nothing, but I realize now I can....I just have to think about it. Here is a good cookie recipe. I eat p-nut butter and celery a lot...it's good   :)

 

Claire Robinson's cookies only use a few ingredients but the last one, sea salt, is key as it gives them their addictive salty finish. Since the cookies are flourless, they're very tender, so let them cool awhile on the pan before moving them.

Ingredients

1 cup natural peanut butter

1 cup sugar

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

1 large egg, lightly beaten

Coarse sea salt, for sprinkling

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F and place the racks in the upper and lower third of the oven.

In a medium bowl, mix the peanut butter, sugar, vanilla and egg until well combined. Spoon 1 tablespoon of the mixture about 1 inch apart onto ungreased baking sheets. Flatten the mounds with the tines of a fork, making a crosshatch pattern on the cookies. Sprinkle coarse salt on top of the cookies.

Bake until golden around the edges, about 10 minutes, switching the position of the sheets halfway through baking. Transfer to racks to cool. Repeat with the remaining dough

From Food Network Kitchens; after further testing and to ensure the best results this recipe has been altered from what was in the actual episode.

Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/claire-robinson/flourless-peanut-butter-cookies-recipe/index.html?oc=linkback

Thank you for the recipe! I'm going to give baking cookies a go today, actually! 

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Hi. I live in Aus but have been to England a few times - I love the variety of gluten-free that you have.  I'll start by listing some of the products I liked over there.

 

Genius- they make breads, crossiants, pan aui chocolate and pizza bases. The brown and multigrain bread are some of the best gluten-free I've had

Livwell- They make bread roll/crumpets and a few other bakery type things

Purebred (irish company, not sure if available in England)- Bread and the most delicous gluten-free long rolls. All these are available in supermarkets here- I buy these despite the distance they travelled because I think they are the best.

 

Nak'd bars are raw food bars that come in different flavours. 

I've also tried some the tesco/ sainsbury own brand gluten-free things that are good.

 

Marks and Spencers and Starbucks offer gluten-free sandwiches. La Tasca have a lot of dishes that are gluten-free. 

 

Unfortunetly most gluten-free food is expensive- but if you never ate a lot of processed foods to begin with you may not find it so much of an issue.

 

You mentioned the difference in taste. Again even some of the best gluten-free will have a different taste. I think it is important when you try something to work out if is a lack of gluten that makes you not like it or if it's just not to your personal taste. To give an example: I don't like coconut biscuits even when made with gluten, so there not point me buying the gluten-free ones.  Remember just because something is gluten-free doesn't mean you have to like it.

 

Maybe if you give examples of the kind of things you used to eat, people will be able to suggest alternatives for you?

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Lauren,  honestly, there is nothing that I used to eat that I miss.  My reactions to gluten were so severe that I actually became afraid to eat anything.   When I started gluten free living I started with juicing.  I got the nutrients I needed and gave my body some time to adjust.  Then I started adding in fresh food and meats.  A gluten incident at a restaurant early on kept me away from those and I still do not eat out often and am very selective when I do.   When food tries to kill you, you tend not to miss it :)

 

I think it's great that you have been diagnosed so young.  This will become a very natural way of life for you and being healthy is better than the any pizza ever made.

 

Colleen 

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Hi everyone,

 

My name is Lauren, I'm 19 years old and I was just hoping for some help.

 

After 1.5 years of tests, new medications and hospital visits, I was finally diagnosed with coeliac disease in July of this year (2013). Since then, I'm been following a gluten free diet but I've been struggling with it. I have been trying out different brands of gluten free bread and even making my own and I still can't handle the taste of it. It's taking me some time to get used to a gluten free diet and it's getting me quite down because I don't know anyone with this condition and none of my friends even really understand it (my housemate - I live at uni, which also makes it hard. Student budget and all - has kindly offered to make me a gluten free cake for my birthday and my other housemate has offered to help me learn recipes which is VERY lovely of them!!) and I just need someone to talk to who has and understands the condition.

 

I am a member of Coeliac UK and have the food directory and a lot more information that comes with it - I was also given a lot from my dietician. It overwhelmed me quite a bit and going gluten free has been a huge change for me.

 

If anyone can help me or just talk about how they are managing with it and reassure me that it does get easier that will really be appreciated!

 

Thank you!

Lauren :)

Hi.

I was diagnosed October last year and has spent the last year learning to live with celiac disease. The bread: You get used to it, I thought it was horrible the first months, but now I almost can't remember what "normal" bread tastes like. Another thing I found difficult was being the "difficult one" when eating out, but as someone said to me: If you feel like you are being difficult asking for special food, just think about how it's going to be easier for the next celiac eating in the same restaurant. :)

 

A few tips:

Baking: Doves gluten free self raising flour (very good for fairy cakes that tastes almost just like "normal")

Pasta: Doves farm gluten-free pasta

Baguettes: Schär has got some good ones

Bread: Fria (frozen, I toast some each time I need bread)

Travel: Toastabag - reusable toastbags that makes it safe for you to use toasters everywhere

 

I hope this was of some help to you.

 

- Heidi

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Hi. I live in Aus but have been to England a few times - I love the variety of gluten-free that you have.  I'll start by listing some of the products I liked over there.

 

Genius- they make breads, crossiants, pan aui chocolate and pizza bases. The brown and multigrain bread are some of the best gluten-free I've had

Livwell- They make bread roll/crumpets and a few other bakery type things

Purebred (irish company, not sure if available in England)- Bread and the most delicous gluten-free long rolls. All these are available in supermarkets here- I buy these despite the distance they travelled because I think they are the best.

 

Nak'd bars are raw food bars that come in different flavours. 

I've also tried some the tesco/ sainsbury own brand gluten-free things that are good.

 

Marks and Spencers and Starbucks offer gluten-free sandwiches. La Tasca have a lot of dishes that are gluten-free. 

 

Unfortunetly most gluten-free food is expensive- but if you never ate a lot of processed foods to begin with you may not find it so much of an issue.

 

You mentioned the difference in taste. Again even some of the best gluten-free will have a different taste. I think it is important when you try something to work out if is a lack of gluten that makes you not like it or if it's just not to your personal taste. To give an example: I don't like coconut biscuits even when made with gluten, so there not point me buying the gluten-free ones.  Remember just because something is gluten-free doesn't mean you have to like it.

 

Maybe if you give examples of the kind of things you used to eat, people will be able to suggest alternatives for you?

Hiya,

 

sorry for the late reply.

 

I eat A LOT of fruit and veg so that wasn't a problem. I never really liked plain meats, I always like flavoring with them so I've been a bit "blah" on the meat side. I'm eating it but it's dry so I've been looking at alternative for like sauces and stuff. So far I've found nothing and haven't had a lot of time to make any from scratch.

 

Then I just at bread, pasta, pizza occasionally and other things. But I like the pasta. Not the bread/pizza though but I'm not too bothered. 

My main issue was what I could have with things, like meats and things to make meals a little less boring!

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Hi.

I was diagnosed October last year and has spent the last year learning to live with celiac disease. The bread: You get used to it, I thought it was horrible the first months, but now I almost can't remember what "normal" bread tastes like. Another thing I found difficult was being the "difficult one" when eating out, but as someone said to me: If you feel like you are being difficult asking for special food, just think about how it's going to be easier for the next celiac eating in the same restaurant. :)

 

A few tips:

Baking: Doves gluten free self raising flour (very good for fairy cakes that tastes almost just like "normal")

Pasta: Doves farm gluten-free pasta

Baguettes: Schär has got some good ones

Bread: Fria (frozen, I toast some each time I need bread)

Travel: Toastabag - reusable toastbags that makes it safe for you to use toasters everywhere

 

I hope this was of some help to you.

 

- Heidi

Thank you Heidi! I'll look out for those! I'll try some different breads. I think that's going to be one I don't get used to really.

 

Eating out has been a struggle - my family and I are going out tomorrow as it's my birthday but I haven't found anywhere that does gluten free options. I might just stick with a vegetarian dish if that will work!

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Lauren,  honestly, there is nothing that I used to eat that I miss.  My reactions to gluten were so severe that I actually became afraid to eat anything.   When I started gluten free living I started with juicing.  I got the nutrients I needed and gave my body some time to adjust.  Then I started adding in fresh food and meats.  A gluten incident at a restaurant early on kept me away from those and I still do not eat out often and am very selective when I do.   When food tries to kill you, you tend not to miss it :)

 

I think it's great that you have been diagnosed so young.  This will become a very natural way of life for you and being healthy is better than the any pizza ever made.

 

Colleen 

I'm sorry they were severe :(. I don't think mine were as severe, even though I did end up in hospital. I did some baking at the weekend - gluten free bread, cookies, and a cake today and it's made me feel better regarding food and so on! 

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if you need dinner/side dish ideas, check out the 'what's for dinner' thread on the baking forum - we have a broad spectrum of cooking skills, from beginner to chef-ish - and tips and advice if you want to make a specific dish  :)  we eat pretty well (and all gluten free!  yay!)

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Hiya,

 

sorry for the late reply.

 

I eat A LOT of fruit and veg so that wasn't a problem. I never really liked plain meats, I always like flavoring with them so I've been a bit "blah" on the meat side. I'm eating it but it's dry so I've been looking at alternative for like sauces and stuff. So far I've found nothing and haven't had a lot of time to make any from scratch.

 

Then I just at bread, pasta, pizza occasionally and other things. But I like the pasta. Not the bread/pizza though but I'm not too bothered. 

My main issue was what I could have with things, like meats and things to make meals a little less boring!

 

 

For side dishes- maybe veggies with things on like honey carrots or you can add different things to mash.

 

Links to free from section for online groceries-  a good way to see what's available. Just ensure it gluten-free though as some might just be nut/dairy free.

http://www.tesco.com/groceries/product/browse/default.aspx?N=4294792806&Ne=4294793660

http://www.tesco.com/groceries/product/browse/default.aspx?N=4294779085&Ne=4294793660

 

http://www.sainsburys.co.uk/groceries/index.jsp?bmUID=1380614559904

 

 

 

If you want to flavour meat you could make your own spice rub. You will probably find that some pre done ones are ok, even if they don't say gluten-free on the label. The same with some marinades. Once you get used to reading labels things get a little easier.

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For side dishes- maybe veggies with things on like honey carrots or you can add different things to mash.

 

Links to free from section for online groceries-  a good way to see what's available. Just ensure it gluten-free though as some might just be nut/dairy free.

http://www.tesco.com/groceries/product/browse/default.aspx?N=4294792806&Ne=4294793660

http://www.tesco.com/groceries/product/browse/default.aspx?N=4294779085&Ne=4294793660

 

http://www.sainsburys.co.uk/groceries/index.jsp?bmUID=1380614559904

 

 

 

If you want to flavour meat you could make your own spice rub. You will probably find that some pre done ones are ok, even if they don't say gluten-free on the label. The same with some marinades. Once you get used to reading labels things get a little easier.

Thank you for the links, Saz! I'll check them out tomorrow :)

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Hey Laura,

 

I'm a student too and recently diagnosed. Student budgets and gluten-free are not friends are they!? Have you looked at getting food on prescription? Or signing up to Glutafin and Juvela (the providers of the prescription food). They should send you a huge free hamper in order to tempt you to get their stuff on prescription. I think I've had about £35 worth of free food from them so far. 

Maybe if you find a recipe for a good sauce or something to go with meat (I'm a veggie so I don't really know what you'd eat with it :/) you could make it in bulk and freeze it? 

My flatmate isn't gluten-free but gave me a really good recipe for stirfry sauce/marinade - peanut butter, gluten-free soy sauce (or tamari sauce), sesame oil, lemon juice, honey/sugar and water. Really really quick cupboard food if they happen to be flavours you like. 

 

Oh and the Coeliac UK Youth Group on Facebook is good too. 

I found a good recipe for gluten-free soda bread which I will dig out and post up here which is still different to 'normal' bread I suppose but it's really tasty! I don't miss anything now except for beer and I suspect I don't get on with whisky either :/ 

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