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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Recipes Needed Please...
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38 posts in this topic

I need recipes for the following dishes:

 

Creamed Corn Casserole

Green Bean Casserole

Fresh cranberry salad

 

And....is there a way to make rolls without a food processer?

 

Thanks Foodie Friends,

 

Colleen

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Just so you know, I'm not a completely horrible person who forgot about you or was ignoring you. I went out to the mall last night to get a phone and then looked around later for my recipes from last year. No dice. I usually just google recipes and use whatever looks good for my sides. I don't get too attached to that sort of recipe.

 

If you're a fan of the "traditional" green bean casserole, this is a good recipe.

http://www.glutenista.com/gluten-free-green-bean-casserole-step-by-step.html

 

I'll probably do this this year because I haven't tried it before. I'll just use AP flour and make my own bread crumbs.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/best-ever-green-bean-casserole-recipe/index.html

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You could never be a horrible person :D

 

I like the second one.  Question tho...what is Panko?

 

Thanks,

 

Colleen

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We call it corn puddin' down here.

 

6 ears of starchy corn

1/2 cup half & half or heavy cream

s&p to taste

graham masala (optional, to taste)

1-2 T butter

pinch of sugar

1/4 - 1/2 cup water

 

Cut the corn kernels 1/2 way through into a bowl or 9x13" pan.  Turn the cob upside down and scrape the remainders of the corn into the bowl or pan.  Repeat with the remaining cobs of corn.

 

Heat a non-stick pan over med. heat, and the butter.  Once melted, add the corn goo and season with S&P.    Add the water, increase the heat to MH and allow to come to a boil.  Reduce the heat to ML.  I usually let this simmer about 3-4 hours, stirring occasionally, adding a little  water when it appears to be getting too thick. 

 

Add the cream or half and half at the end.  If it's not thick enough (because you added too much water), mix up a little arrowroot with water, bring to a boil, and stir that in.  You can make it up to 2 days in advance, then just reheat it in the micro or bake it. 

 

I think 6 ears would serve 4-5 people as a side.  This is how my cracker MIL taught me how to make corn puddin', but she usually cooked it all day. 

 

Warning:  do not leave your glasses on the table if that's where you scrape the corn.  I put them on the day after I made corn puddin' and thought I was going to need to buy new glasses.

 

I've never tried it with frozen or canned corn out of respect for dear MIL.

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You could never be a horrible person :D

 

I like the second one.  Question tho...what is Panko?

 

Thanks,

 

Colleen

 

I grew up baking, not cooking. So uh... it's breadcrumbs? I put bread in a food processor and BAM! It's whatever I decide to call it. I'm sure if our resident expert meanders along she'll be able to explain that there is an important difference but it's all the crumbs of bread to me. :ph34r:

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Marilyn,

 

That sounds excellent.  Thank you.  What is graham Masala?

 

Colleen

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lol.  Ok, Panko = bread crumbs.  Sounds good to me.

 

Thanks,

 

Colleen

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Just an FYI- you can make bread crumbs in a blender.

Can you eat cheese? I have a great cheesy corn recipe that a local BBQ place is known for.

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 I can certainly eat cheese on Thanksgiving.   Would love the recipe Karen, Thank You.

 

 

Colleen 

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I think Marilyn meant garam masala which is a mixture of fragrant spices, but I'll let her clarify since it is her recipe.

 

There is a difference between bread crumbs and panko. Panko are Japanese breadcrumbs and they are denser and are made only from the white bread, not the crusts.

Recipes that call for panko usually do that for a reason, but I have been sneaky when I am out of panko and used just chunky coarser breadcrumbs.

I make my own in a mini-chopper but blenders work fine.

I have purchased G F panko, but they were "meh".

 

I am sure you meant the real resident expert, not me, but she may meander by as well.

I just happened to be meandering...that's all....not buttin in or nuthin, honest.  ^_^

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er

Marilyn,

 

That sounds excellent.  Thank you.  What is graham Masala?

 

Colleen

Yes, I misspelled it.  Garam Masala.  It wasn't in my MIL's original recipe, but I love the additional flavors.  It typically is a spice mixture including coriander, cardamon, pepper, cinnamon, caraway, cloves, ginger, nutmeg and a couple of other herbs. 

 

I get mine online at The s p I c e house.  Yummy yummy!

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I need to type it out.  Bug me tomorrow if I haven't put it on.

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I need to type it out.  Bug me tomorrow if I haven't put it on.

you heard it....we get to bug her. he he bzz bzz bzz

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Not your Mama's green bean casserole!

 

Swiss Cheese Green Beans

 

2 Tbsp flour - rice or an AP mix

2 Tbsp margarine/butter

2 cups sour cream (light is OK)

½ teasp onion powder

¼ teasp sugar

32 oz frozen whole petite green beans

½ lb strong Swiss cheese, shredded

½ cup bread crumbs

2 tabsp margarine/butter

 

Pre heat oven to 400F (this is flexible if something else is cooking at 350F or 425F that is fine)

 

Melt 2 tbsp of butter in saucepan, gradually blend in the flour.

Add sour cream, onion, salt (I omit), sugar. Stir. Take off heat and set aside.

 

Cook beans in water until fork tender. Don’t over cook because they will still cook in the casserole.

 

Saute bread crumbs in butter.

 

Grease an 8 x 11 dish. Layer beans, cheese and white sauce. Sprinkle bread crumbs on top.

Cook for 20 minutes.

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The cat senses any time someone thinks of ham and here she is trying to help with this recipe!

 

 

 

 Cheesy Corn Bake

 

2 Tbps margarine/butter

4 tsp gluten-free Flour (AP or rice)

1/8 tea garlic powder

¾ cup milk

6 oz shredded American Cheese (get the good stuff, not Kraft singles)

3 oz cream cheese, cut up

3 (10 oz) packs of frozen corn

3 oz ham diced teeny tiny (bacon might be good) (Of course, bacon would be good)

 

Pre heat oven to 350F. Flexible if cooking something else at a higher heat. Put this on bottom to avoid burning the top if cooking at a higher heat.

 

In a large pan, melt butter. Stir in flour and garlic powder until smooth. Add milk. Cook and stir over medium heat until thickened and bubbly (maybe 5-20 minutes)

 

Stir in cheese and cream cheese. Cook and stir over low heat until melted. Stir in ham and corn.

 

Transfer to a greased 2 quart casserole. Bake for 45 minutes uncovered. If cooking at a higher temp, might need to put the lid or foil over top after 25 minutes if its browning or looking dry.

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When I type up recipes, I try to make them very simple because some people are trying to learn to cook.  Also, this way I don't have to re-type them for my boys or my SIL or niece that need lots of directions. 

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Not your Mama's green bean casserole!

 

Swiss Cheese Green Beans

 

2 Tbsp flour - rice or an AP mix

2 Tbsp margarine/butter

2 cups sour cream (light is OK)

½ teasp onion powder

¼ teasp sugar

32 oz frozen whole petite green beans

½ lb strong Swiss cheese, shredded

½ cup bread crumbs

2 tabsp margarine/butter

 

Pre heat oven to 400F (this is flexible if something else is cooking at 350F or 425F that is fine)

 

Melt 2 tbsp of butter in saucepan, gradually blend in the flour.

Add sour cream, onion, salt (I omit), sugar. Stir. Take off heat and set aside.

 

Cook beans in water until fork tender. Don’t over cook because they will still cook in the casserole.

 

Saute bread crumbs in butter.

 

Grease an 8 x 11 dish. Layer beans, cheese and white sauce. Sprinkle bread crumbs on top.

Cook for 20 minutes.

WHERE was this recipe when i was over-run with green beans from the never-ending garden???  :lol:

 

that's ok - i froze a bunch of them already cooked, so this should work great - everybody loves the green bean casserole (with the cr of mush soup and fried onions) but ME.  maybe i will make this for ME lolz happpy thanxgiving to ME  - i'll call them haricort verts or whatever and people will fear them  ;)  

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There is a difference between bread crumbs and panko. Panko are Japanese breadcrumbs and they are denser and are made only from the white bread, not the crusts.

Recipes that call for panko usually do that for a reason, but I have been sneaky when I am out of panko and used just chunky coarser breadcrumbs.

I make my own in a mini-chopper but blenders work fine.

I have purchased G F panko, but they were "meh".

 

I am sure you meant the real resident expert, not me, but she may meander by as well.

I just happened to be meandering...that's all....not buttin in or nuthin, honest.  ^_^

i am not the resident expert, but if i need panko-like crumbs, i put bread in the oven to dry it out until it's dried on the outside but still 'bready' on the inside, then break it into pieces and put in mini-chopper.  the moistness of the inside bread sort of compacts it a little and keeps it big.  if i'm really ambitious or i'm making something that i want to be really crunchy, i will spread the crumbs on a sheet pan (or *shhhhh!*  tinfoil) and bake them so they are nice and crispy.  i am too lazy to cut the crusts off, but one could do that if one wished.

 

yah - i haven't found any packaged bread crumbs of any sort that were worth a flip - and they cost $$$ for stupid crumbs.  i'd rather make my own.  for my 'regular' bread crumbs, i save out the bread ends in the freezer until i have enough to do a batch  :)

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i am not the resident expert, but if i need panko-like crumbs, i put bread in the oven to dry it out until it's dried on the outside but still 'bready' on the inside, then break it into pieces and put in mini-chopper.  the moistness of the inside bread sort of compacts it a little and keeps it big.  if i'm really ambitious or i'm making something that i want to be really crunchy, i will spread the crumbs on a sheet pan (or *shhhhh!*  tinfoil) and bake them so they are nice and crispy.  i am too lazy to cut the crusts off, but one could do that if one wished.

 

yah - i haven't found any packaged bread crumbs of any sort that were worth a flip - and they cost $$$ for stupid crumbs.  i'd rather make my own.  for my 'regular' bread crumbs, i save out the bread ends in the freezer until i have enough to do a batch  :)

 

I do almost the same thing, only I just use my toaster on a super light setting. I didn't know about the no crust thing, but I'm too lazy too and I've never had a bad result from using a whole slice of bread to make crumbs. Besides, I could never justify throwing perfectly good bread away so on top of the cutting crusts off I'd have to freeze the crusts with my bread butts to not make myself crazy with the waste. Not worth the effort in my house. It's all just bread out of a food processor. 

 

I totally agree about the waste of money on buying crumbs too. We already pay 3-4 times as much for bread, and crumbs cause about twice as much as a loaf of bread. And all they have to do is put stale bread in a food processor! What a rip off. 

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Cookie Pie Crust

 

2 cups gluten-free ginger snaps (35 to 38 cookies)

2 Tbsp sugar

1/3 cup cold butter or margarine, diced small

1 Tbsp rice flour or baking mix

 

Preheat oven to 350.

 

Put cookies, rice flour and sugar into a food processor or blender and pulse until you have fine crumbs.

Add butter and pulse until it forms clumps.

 

Lightly grease a pie pan. Press the crumb mixture into pie pan and up the sides.

Bake for 8-9 minutes. Then fill.

 

I used Mi-Del gingersnaps about an 8 oz bag. Kininkinick makes some too.

This works well with Pamela’s chocolate wafer cookies, just omit sugar.

 

I just use the pumpkin pie recipe on the Libbys pumpkin can.  You can make a pumpkin pie without a crust and its yummy.  I have seen that and they put pecans on top to have a little crunch

 

 

 

 

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I've actually never made a ginger snap crust, but I've heard good things. I'm sure that it would positively thrill my husband as he loves the cookies and loves pumpkin pie. Maybe I'll try something new this year instead of the whole making a crust thing for my pie. I'd personally prefer chocolate, but he's anti-pumpkin chocolate anything. He says they don't go together. (He may have been dropped when he was a baby, I never asked.) 

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Those are great Karen.  Thank you so much. :D

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How did Thanksgiving already approach anyway???

 

That's what I want to know. 

 

Ewwwww, and then there's Christmas. 

 

Bah Hum Bug, sorry.

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Ewwwww, and then there's Christmas. 

 

Bah Hum Bug, sorry.

 

Too soon!

mouthshut-mouth-shut-zip-zip-it-smiley-e

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I do almost the same thing, only I just use my toaster on a super light setting. I didn't know about the no crust thing, but I'm too lazy too and I've never had a bad result from using a whole slice of bread to make crumbs. Besides, I could never justify throwing perfectly good bread away so on top of the cutting crusts off I'd have to freeze the crusts with my bread butts to not make myself crazy with the waste. Not worth the effort in my house. It's all just bread out of a food processor. 

 

I totally agree about the waste of money on buying crumbs too. We already pay 3-4 times as much for bread, and crumbs cause about twice as much as a loaf of bread. And all they have to do is put stale bread in a food processor! What a rip off. 

Oh man, I've been makin' bad panko crumbs for awhile now.  I just take a hunk of year old gluten-free French bread out of the freezer and stick it in my mini food processor, watch it closely, and when I have big crumbs, consider it panko.  If I  don't catch it in time, I substitute bread crumbs.  :wub:

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