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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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Coffee - Good Or Bad?

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Personally, I've always had digestive issues when I consume coffee - every time. I know coffee acts as a stimulant which makes you need to go, but is it still considered a no go for gluten free diet?

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Good!   coffee-machine.gif

 

 

 

Seriously, There is no reason not to have coffee on a gluten free diet.  It has never been on the forbidden foods list as it does not contain gluten.

 

Now coffee does bother some people, Celiac or not.  The acid in it can be hard on the stomach or the caffeine bothers people.  If that is the case, don't drink it.

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I have heard about some CC issues with coffee, so that might be something to double check :)

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Plain coffee is good.

Flavored coffees and creamers need to be checked for safe ingredients - every time.

As Karen mentioned there are other reasons folks cant drink plain coffee, gluten is not one of them.

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Unless you order your coffee at a donut shop, there really are no cc issues with coffee.

 

GottaSki.....screamers?  :P

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If coffee was a problem from a gluten standpoint half the people here would be dead by now. Not an issue. Also Bailey's (I think?) makes a killer red velvet creamer. I use it for hot chocolate but I'll bet it's amazing in coffee. 

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Nice, well that's good to hear! Just thought I'd check.

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If I couldn't have coffee......I have no words

Coffee=good. Very very good

And tea too!

Really there is a lot more we CAN eat than not

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I find coffee to be very acidic and I cannot drink it on an empty stomach.  Some people need that first cup of joe to get moving in the morning, but I've found that I need to have food in my stomach first.  Otherwise it tends to make me a little nausious.  For what it's worth... orange juice does the same thing to me.  Too acidic and high in sugar - I can't stomach orange juice even with food, unless I really, really dilute it (and at that point, what's the point?).

 

Coffee also freaks out my bladder - but my bladder is retarded for other reasons.

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My mom is gluten intolerant just like me and she cannot have coffee. She's intolerant to it. She has been gluten free for a while and every time she tries to add coffee back, she gets sick. So I think it's possible that you might be intolerant to it. I hope not!

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I read that the protein in coffee is similar in structure to the protein of gluten. Sometimes the body gets tricked and thus you get sick. 

 

http://primaldocs.com/opinion/19-foods-that-cross-react-with-gluten/

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I read that the protein in coffee is similar in structure to the protein of gluten. Sometimes the body gets tricked and thus you get sick. 

 

http://primaldocs.com/opinion/19-foods-that-cross-react-with-gluten/

That whole idea of coffee cross reacting is junk science.......it has no validity at all.  Coffee can be an irritant for all the reasons stated above.  It has nothing to do with gluten.  :)

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I read that the protein in coffee is similar in structure to the protein of gluten. Sometimes the body gets tricked and thus you get sick. 

 

http://primaldocs.com/opinion/19-foods-that-cross-react-with-gluten/

 

I wonder how these internet pseudo-doctors came up with this nonsense? 

 

What’s with all the talk about certain types of food causing “cross-reactivity?”

There is not yet reliable data about cross-reactivity. As for the alleged possibility that many gluten-free foods or drinks (such as coffee, milk, orange juice, etc.) would trigger symptoms in celiac individuals due to hidden antigens mimicking gluten or cross-reacting with anti-gluten antibodies, it must be clearly stated that this is all false information, devoid of any scientific basis, and must be rejected as untrue

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/archives/faq/whats-with-all-the-talk-about-certain-types-of-food-causing-cross-reactivity

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I wonder how these internet pseudo-doctors came up with this nonsense? 

 

What’s with all the talk about certain types of food causing “cross-reactivity?”

There is not yet reliable data about cross-reactivity. As for the alleged possibility that many gluten-free foods or drinks (such as coffee, milk, orange juice, etc.) would trigger symptoms in celiac individuals due to hidden antigens mimicking gluten or cross-reacting with anti-gluten antibodies, it must be clearly stated that this is all false information, devoid of any scientific basis, and must be rejected as untrue

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/archives/faq/whats-with-all-the-talk-about-certain-types-of-food-causing-cross-reactivity

 

My mistake. I had heard about cross-reactive foods a few times, so I thought I'd post something. Thanks for clearing that up! :)

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I wonder how these internet pseudo-doctors came up with this nonsense? 

 

What’s with all the talk about certain types of food causing “cross-reactivity?”

There is not yet reliable data about cross-reactivity. As for the alleged possibility that many gluten-free foods or drinks (such as coffee, milk, orange juice, etc.) would trigger symptoms in celiac individuals due to hidden antigens mimicking gluten or cross-reacting with anti-gluten antibodies, it must be clearly stated that this is all false information, devoid of any scientific basis, and must be rejected as untrue

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/archives/faq/whats-with-all-the-talk-about-certain-types-of-food-causing-cross-reactivity

Maybe there should be a sticky, or at least something on the newbie thread about this. It seems that lately a LOT of people are reading about this on those quack sites. If we nip it in the bud, it'll save a lot of new folks from giving up foods they don't need to.

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Maybe there should be a sticky, or at least something on the newbie thread about this. It seems that lately a LOT of people are reading about this on those quack sites. If we nip it in the bud, it'll save a lot of new folks from giving up foods they don't need to.

Agreed it would be good to add to the newbie thread, but I had heard about this through the grapevine and I am not a newbie. I think it's important to keep each other updated on supposedly "new research" and what is true/false, not just automatically stick it in a section that only newbies would read  ;)

 

Thank you again for the correct information. 

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I suggested a "celiac myth sticky" a while back but the consensus was that people will argue with the facts anyway because of what's on the Internet

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Maybe there should be a sticky, or at least something on the newbie thread about this. It seems that lately a LOT of people are reading about this on those quack sites. If we nip it in the bud, it'll save a lot of new folks from giving up foods they don't need to.

We do have links on that thread to reputable sites. Unfortunately, we can't force people to read them. Nor can we keep up with all the odd theories, cures, and other myths that might pop up. We try, but it's really up to each person to use some common sense, recognize scams and attention seekers and seek out reliable info.

If people don't believe us and the Univ of Chicago, it won't hurt them not to drink coffee. The Internet sites I think are worse are the " cures" and the companies that take hundreds of dollars for bogus testing.

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I agree that the idea of coffee being mistaken by your body as being the same as wheat protein sounds like voodoo BS.

 

However, isn't this the same thing as what happens with oats?  I was lead to believe that the protein in oats is not actually the same as that in wheat, rye, and barley - but many celiacs cannot tolerate oats because the protein is similar-enough that the body reacts to it as if it were the same protein.  Same with rice, only a reaction to rice is much more rare.

No??

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I agree that the idea of coffee being mistaken by your body as being the same as wheat protein sounds like voodoo BS.

 

However, isn't this the same thing as what happens with oats?  I was lead to believe that the protein in oats is not actually the same as that in wheat, rye, and barley - but many celiacs cannot tolerate oats because the protein is similar-enough that the body reacts to it as if it were the same protein.  Same with rice, only a reaction to rice is much more rare.

No??

 

 

Oats -

 

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/archives/faq/do-oats-contain-gluten

 

Rice probably comes from the same "cross-reactive" nonsense.  Coffee, unless you eat the bean, has almost no protein in it.  This just makes this whole idea even sillier.  I imagine someone thinking - "What food would cause the biggest uproar and get me the most attention?"  :ph34r:

 

http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/archives/faq/is-there-evidence-of-cross-reactivity-such-as-any-foods-that-do-not-contain-gluten-but-cause-gluten-like-reactions-in-the-body

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Thanks KarenG.  I'm still a bit confused because my uncle has Celiac and he most definitely cannot tolerate oats.  Even the ones that are certified gluten-free.

 

(my confusion is in relation to the oats - not the coffee)

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Look at it botanically and you can understand better.  If you aren't familiar with the plants, look them up online.  Wheat, barley, rye and oats are members of the grass family.  Many celiacs don't even react to oats.  All are not supposed to react to other grasses such as corn rice and millet.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poaceae 

Coffee comes from a flowering shrub.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coffee_plant  It is not at all closely related to grasses.  

 

Apart from that, coffee is known to have contamination issues.  Not everyone is honest on this planet, and when things are expensive, they can have cheaper things added to them to increase profit.  http://www.rsc.org/chemistryworld/Issues/2007/September/FightingFoodFraudWithScience.asp

 

Coffee has been found to be contaminated with barley among other things:

http://www.usp.org/food-ingredients/food-fraud-database

http://www.foodfraud.org/search/site?search_api_views_fulltext=coffee

 

You grind your own whole beans for extra safety.  As a super sensitive, that's what I do.

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Just wanted to mention the possibility of reacting to caffeine for some people.  Not as a gluten reaction, but some people don't tolerate coffee or caffeine.  It's simple to test if it bothers you.  Stop drinking coffee and any caffeine for a month and see if there is an improvement.

 

Thanks for the links Stephanie.  I'd seen those reports about barley in some coffee before but had forgot about it.

 

Here is a link to the CSA page on oats.  It has several studies listed that discuss the possibility of some celiacs reacting to oats.

 

http://www.csaceliacs.info/guide_to_oats.jsp

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It's simple to test if it bothers you.  Stop drinking coffee and any caffeine for a month and see if there is an improvement.

 

Just wanted to add that some people will have an initial withdrawal reaction to giving up caffeine cold-turkey, such as headaches.

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