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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Greater "sensitivity" To Alcohol?
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18 posts in this topic

Ok... I'm not a huge drinker, but I do like to down a few now and then with friends.  Ever since I was in high-school I have been able to "hold my own".  For a small-framed, skinny female I can hold my liquor suprisingly well.  But I had two drinks the other night and had more of a buzz than I've ever had before from just two drinks.  And yes, I had eaten well and all that.  Absolutely no chance of any accidental gluten.

 

Anyone else find this to be true after going gluten-free?

I'm wondering if I'm actually starting to absorb things better/faster - including alcohol???  Am I crazy?

 

(I've only been gluten-free for about 6 weeks.)

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By now you would most definitely have improvement with absorbtion.  Way to go with the healing. :D

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For the first couple months, I had a ton of problems drinking, mostly because it's harder than you'd think to learn all the gluten-free alcohols! If you drank vodka or spiced rum, chances are it wasn't gluten free

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For the first couple months, I had a ton of problems drinking, mostly because it's harder than you'd think to learn all the gluten-free alcohols! If you drank vodka or spiced rum, chances are it wasn't gluten free

 

Nope - Wild Turkey Bourbon.  The distillation process takes out any gluten.  And this wasn't a sick feeling, just a buzzed feeling - like I would normally get after the 4th or 5th drink... not after just two.

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I experienced this too.  When young I used to be able to keep up with the guys when I was out and about.  Once married life slowed down, but I could still drink along with my husband.  However, since going gluten free, no more.  I can only have one or two drinks and I am done.  I had even started getting night sweats when I drank more than two drinks, so I just stopped.  Now after 4 months, I will let myself have 1 or 2 at home and only once in awhile, as in, I had a bad day Friday, and had some wine, before that it was October 6 or 7 since I had, enjoyed a glass of wine.  Not sure why, what is going on inside to create this difference, but it is there.

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Nope - Wild Turkey Bourbon.  The distillation process takes out any gluten.  And this wasn't a sick feeling, just a buzzed feeling - like I would normally get after the 4th or 5th drink... not after just two.

I was a crown, wine, absinthe, jager, mojito, and martini sometimes drinker.  When the problems started I was down to just crown and wine.  Same thing here, one or two hits like four or five.  

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yup - i could always hold my own and had no problems (since my wild child days, i only drank beer and wine anyway) now i can not CAN NOT drink my chardonnay <really the only wine i really liked anyway) i am ready to fight!  <which is really unlike me, i am a silly giggly person and always have been even when drinking)  this is since i am recovering well, i guess, my intestines are absorbing everything now, including alcohol.  beer it is, and not even that many lolz i guess i am a cheap date anymore  ;)

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My alcohol tolerance has diminished as well. I was a margarita, sipping tequila drinker with the occasional red wine. I literally have the worst GI symptoms from drinking alcohol as well as being a lightweight now. I choose not to drink because it makes me feel sick. It was not always the case.

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I'm pretty sure it's because, before going gluten-free, our bodies weren't absorbing all the alcohol. Once it starts healing, BAM! I went from being able to hold my beer pretty well pre-gluten-free, then down to drunk on 1 glass of wine after.  I've re-built my tolerance over the years, but more than 2 or 3 drinks puts me firmly in tipsy category.

I drink a lot of brown liquor (scotch, bourbon, whisky, rye), and if it wasn't gluten-free, I'd probably be dead by now.

 

Some people, however, develop a real sensitivity to alcohol, in that they react to it no matter how much. Then there's sensitivities to sulfites, which makes finding a safe wine a pain in the arse (my mom has this. I'm always trying to find low-sulfite wines to take home to her)

 

Being a cheap drunk is definitely easier on the wallet, though. So, if you know you can only handle a couple, make sure they're something good and take your time.

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Thanks everone!  Always good to know I'm not the only one!

 

Pegleg84: regarding sulfites and wine-headaches... I've found pinot noir to not hit me like that (well... in my pre-gluten-free days anyhow... haven't had it recently) - and it also seems to really help to let the wine breathe for a bit before drinking it.

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Me too. When I was younger, I could drink just fine, but around the mid-point of college (which is, incidentally, when I really started to get sick,) I found that drinking just one beer would give me a horrible hangover, and often times drinking more than one glass of wine would make me throw up. These days, I prefer to have a half a glass of wine every now and then, but nothing more. My body does NOT like alcohol. 

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Organic Wines such as Frey and Orleans Hill Winery do not add sulfites to their wine. Both  are reasonably priced. I drink occasionally, wine only, and it really has no intoxicating effect. Just like I have been " mildly" glutened . so, no point in drinking it.

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This happened to me too. Back in college, I could slam so much alcohol and swagger about all night. Now I basically puke when I drink in excess. I figure this is a blessing in disguise since I'll never have to worry about getting crazy or otherwise making a huge fool of myself. Cest la vie!

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I don't have much of a problem with alcohol that is gluten free, although i am in college (a senior) so still kinda young.

 

I had a ton of problems (i mean a ton) drinking when I first started out. It is a total myth that the distillation process takes out gluten from alcohol - it does, to some extent, but to celiacs who are pretty sensitive (so, most of us), it actually still totally affects us. It's really obnoxious actually, looking up gluten free items on the internet, because a lot of people will still tell you that vodka or whiskey is gluten free. That's a total lie. Better quality vodka or whiskey has less gluten, because it has been distilled more, and cheaper vodka or whiskey has more gluten that survives the process. 

 

Generally, if you drink vodka or whiskey that is pretty affordable, it has gluten in it. (assuming it's a wheat based vodka. smirnoff and other vodkas made from wheat is totally fine) I am extremely sensitive, and pretty experienced, and I can tell you right now that wheat vodka or any whiskey makes me want to die, for like, two weeks. i might have well just drank a beer. some rum is dangerous too, even though it's derived from sugar cane - captain morgan, for example, is NOT gluten free - the spice they use contains gluten. both me and one of my less sensitive celiac friends both take a huge hit from one drink of captain morgan. a lot of dark rums aren't in fact gluten free. bacardi is great though!

 

So, if you're having reactions to alcohol, it's probably because it's really hard to drink alcohol at first. I drink cider, gluten free beer sometimes (it sucks), bacardi, smirnoff, and jose cuervo. If i do that, i don't take a risk at all (although a lot of bars like to replace a good alcohol with crappy alcohol - like pour some cheap vodka into a smirnoff bottle, so that's risky). A lot of s$#& has crap in it that you don't want. If you aren't having reactions, but just getting hit hard, I'd say that's pretty sweet since you're saving money!

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 It is a total myth that the distillation process takes out gluten from alcohol - it does, to some extent, but to celiacs who are pretty sensitive (so, most of us), it actually still totally affects us. It's really obnoxious actually, looking up gluten free items on the internet, because a lot of people will still tell you that vodka or whiskey is gluten free. That's a total lie. Better quality vodka or whiskey has less gluten, because it has been distilled more, and cheaper vodka or whiskey has more gluten that survives the process. 

 

 

 

I do not know why you persist in perpetuating this myth, Nick. 

 

 We have told you before that the distillation process renders the gluten harmless. I have given you the science to read

and I have linked you to the celiac research centers that say it is safe for celiacs.

 

If there were gluten in plain alcohol,--vodka, gin, whiskey, etc.-- I'd be dead by now. 

 

Please refrain from posting outright untruths. Thank you.

 

Are distilled beverages made with a prohibited grain (wheat, rye, barley) safe for celiacs?

Only specific gluten-free beers (Bard’s Tale, New Grist, Green’s, Redbridge, to name a few) are appropriately gluten free. As for pure spirits, (vodka, gin, scotch), the distillation process makes these beverages safe because the protein is removed. However, flavored spirits may contain malt, and should be avoided.

 

--Univ. of Chicago Celiac Center

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I don't have much of a problem with alcohol that is gluten free, although i am in college (a senior) so still kinda young.

I had a ton of problems (i mean a ton) drinking when I first started out. It is a total myth that the distillation process takes out gluten from alcohol - it does, to some extent, but to celiacs who are pretty sensitive (so, most of us), it actually still totally affects us. It's really obnoxious actually, looking up gluten free items on the internet, because a lot of people will still tell you that vodka or whiskey is gluten free. That's a total lie. Better quality vodka or whiskey has less gluten, because it has been distilled more, and cheaper vodka or whiskey has more gluten that survives the process.

Generally, if you drink vodka or whiskey that is pretty affordable, it has gluten in it. (assuming it's a wheat based vodka. smirnoff and other vodkas made from wheat is totally fine) I am extremely sensitive, and pretty experienced, and I can tell you right now that wheat vodka or any whiskey makes me want to die, for like, two weeks. i might have well just drank a beer. some rum is dangerous too, even though it's derived from sugar cane - captain morgan, for example, is NOT gluten free - the spice they use contains gluten. both me and one of my less sensitive celiac friends both take a huge hit from one drink of captain morgan. a lot of dark rums aren't in fact gluten free. bacardi is great though!

So, if you're having reactions to alcohol, it's probably because it's really hard to drink alcohol at first. I drink cider, gluten free beer sometimes (it sucks), bacardi, smirnoff, and jose cuervo. If i do that, i don't take a risk at all (although a lot of bars like to replace a good alcohol with crappy alcohol - like pour some cheap vodka into a smirnoff bottle, so that's risky). A lot of s$#& has crap in it that you don't want. If you aren't having reactions, but just getting hit hard, I'd say that's pretty sweet since you're saving money!

I agree with Irish on this. Also, what proof do you have that Captain Morgans rum drinks have gluten? Or any dark rums? Last I heard, they were gluten-free but I don't drink them so I haven't kept up with that.

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I had a ton of problems (i mean a ton) drinking when I first started out. It is a total myth that the distillation process takes out gluten from alcohol - it does, to some extent, but to celiacs who are pretty sensitive (so, most of us), it actually still totally affects us. It's really obnoxious actually, looking up gluten free items on the internet, because a lot of people will still tell you that vodka or whiskey is gluten free. That's a total lie. Better quality vodka or whiskey has less gluten, because it has been distilled more, and cheaper vodka or whiskey has more gluten that survives the process.

Calling people liars is a violation of our board rules, unless you can provide a credible, scientifically verified source to back up your allegation. Provide one, or retract your statement.
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Captain Morgan Spiced Rum is gluten-free

 

"Rum – Captain Morgan Spiced Rum, Barcardi, Malibu – Most rums are made from sugar cane. Captain Morgan indicated that the spiced rum contains no gluten ingredients."

http://www.gluten-free-for-life.com/gluten-free-alcohol.html

 

 

Whiskey and other distilled alcohols are also gluten-free - as long as they don't have malt flavorings in them, which of course come from Barley.

 

If you're having a reaction to whiskey, it is not gluten, it is something else.

 

For me, I prefer Bourbon.  Wild Turkey Bourbon.  (Bourbon is also required to be made in virgin barrels too.)  I don't get any kind of gluten-reaction, or get sick or anything - it just goes to my head much faster than it used to.

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