• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Celiac.com E-Newsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsCeliac.com E-Newsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Newly Diagnosed . . . What To Avoid On Food Labeling?
0

7 posts in this topic

Hi.  Newly diagnosed Celiac here, male, 48 years old . . . just looking for direction.  The diagnosis came very fast - in December.  I saw my new PCP, he ordered blood tests, I had a TTGiGA blood confirmation, and a subsequent GI appt / upper endo intestinal biopsy (and colonoscopy) done and a confirmation of Celiac - all in the space of about 4 weeks!  My head has been spinning ever since.  My biopsy showed marsh 3, villous atrophy.  I’m still just trying to let this diagnosis settle in my brain.  I just got the confirmation on Jan 8th.  I never even knew what Celiac was, but given my symptoms, I should have known.  I knew something wasn’t right for sure.   What I’m concerned about now is eating the right foods, and trying to figure out how to work the maze of all the “gluten-free” food out there . . . and what actually still has trace amounts of gluten!!  I know for people dieting it’s no big deal to have trace amounts of gluten, but for me, that’s no good.  Right?  And, I guess, what ingredients do you need to steer clear of when reading packaging? :unsure: 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


Hi and Welcome to the Forum!

 

Many newbies find the Newbie 101 thread to be very helpful (in the "Coping With" section).  You are correct in that trace amounts of gluten are no good for you.  In fact, they are poison.  That may sound extreme to you right now... but once you've been gluten-free for awhile and start to feel better I think you'll see what I mean.  After that, the first time you accidentally get glutened (it happens to all of us) you'll be convinced.  :)

 

For the first few months it is best to avoid processed food.  In my opinion, processed food isn't really healthy and it doesn't get any healthier just because it is gluten-free.  In fact, some gluten-free products are even less healthy because of all the extra additives they have to add to get it to stick together and not taste like cardboard or sawdust.. and a lot of it does anyhow.  Try to stick with whole food... meat, veggies, simple starches.  They are naturally gluten-free, don't require label analysis, and will allow your body to heal.

 

If you do go for processed food - or any food that requires a label - here's a gluten-free additive list:  http://zenfullydelicious.com/gluten-free-101/list-of-gluten-free-ingredients-additives/

Make sure you also check any vitamins/supplements/medications that you take.

When in doubt Google it - a simple "does ketchup have gluten?" or "is modified food starch gluten free?" Google search will answer 99% of your questions.

A good probiotic and a good digestive enzyme usually help a lot too while you're healing and restoring your good gut bacteria.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The obvious things to look for, and avoid, are wheat, rye, barley and oats.

In Canada and the US, wheat must be clearly disclosed on the label, either in the ingredients list, or in a "contains" statement. In Canada, all gluten sources must be clearly disclosed.

Rye and oats don't hide, but barley can in the US. Look for the word "malt" and assume it is barley malt unless stated otherwise. Ingredients starting with M-A-L-T as the first letters (maltodextrin, for example) are not gluten.

Many companies have a policy that they will clearly disclose any gluten source, whether required by law or not.

Here's a list.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The obvious things to look for, and avoid, are wheat, rye, barley and oats.

In Canada and the US, wheat must be clearly disclosed on the label, either in the ingredients list, or in a "contains" statement. In Canada, all gluten sources must be clearly disclosed.

Rye and oats don't hide, but barley can in the US. Look for the word "malt" and assume it is barley malt unless stated otherwise. Ingredients starting with M-A-L-T as the first letters (maltodextrin, for example) are not gluten.

Many companies have a policy that they will clearly disclose any gluten source, whether required by law or not.

Here's a list.

 

 

This is a nice concise version of what I would say!  

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to the forum Justneguy! :)

 

Peter got it right, wheat, rye, barley, oats.  Oats are very often contaminated with other gluten grains in processing.  Some celiacs react to them the same way as they react to wheat, rye and barley though, even if they are not contaminated.  So to be on the safe side and give yourself the best chance of healing, it is best to stay away from them for a while.

 

Eating whole foods is a good way to start the gluten-free diet.  It saves lots of time reading labels in the grocery store.  You often can find whole foods around the outside perimeter of the grocery stores.  Frozen foods are ok if they are simple single items like frozen peas etc.  Usually if there are 3 or fewer ingredients on the package you are ok.  As long as they aren't gluten of course.

 

Some starting the gluten-free diet tips for the first 6 months:

Get tested before starting the gluten-free diet.
Get your vitamin/mineral levels tested also.
Don't eat in restaurants
Eat only whole foods not processed foods.
Eat only food you cook yourself, think simple foods, not gourmet meals.
Take probiotics.
Take gluten-free vitamins.
Take digestive enzymes.
Avoid dairy if it causes symptoms.
Avoid sugars and starchy foods.
Avoid alcohol.
Watch out for cross contamination.

Helpful threads:

FAQ Celiac com
http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/forum-7/announcement-3-frequently-asked-questions-about-celiac-disease/

Newbie Info 101
http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/91878-newbie-info-101/

 

What's For Breakfast Today?
http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/81858-whats-for-breakfast-today/

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


Thank you all for the information. I really appreciate it!! This is certainly a major undertaking so I appreciate the advice.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I'm a newbie here as well and my GI doctor suggested the website: fooducate.com and it's very useful. I'm in the same boat as you learning by trial and error. My shopping trips take longer and it's hard when you have a 2yr old impatient boy to boot.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      107,313
    • Total Posts
      935,428
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      64,971
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    johnojohno
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I tried saving receipts and itemizing everything one year. It came out just a few dollars below the standard deduction so I don't even bother anymore. Plus, I don't eat much bread or noodles, the older I get. The hassle of being gluten free has turned me into a fresh fruit, vegetable and meat person.  Good luck.
    • Thanks Ennis and cycling lady, Ennis thanks for letting me know I'm not alone on the goofy intolerance stuff. cycling lady I'd love an orange tree that must be great to just go pluck one to get your serving. We do fruits regularly here too.  I just test the lands of processed land occasionally and apparently the land mines are everywhere. I chose homemade almond milk today.  I am just perplexed my son reacted too which is the concerning thing to me. From the research I've done and your suggestions it's best we remove the product from our list of potential items for it clearly is not a match. have a good day
    • Drop the dairy and if your eating any drop oats. Enzymes to digest lactose are produced by the tips of the villi, so your going to have issues with til they heal. Remove for a few months at least change over to a nut based milk, some hard cheeses might still be fine but you might want to change over to vegan/dairy free versions of it for a while then try reintroducing them.  Fruits yeah large amounts of sugar are more of a issue then the fiber and bother are going to cause bloating, gas, etc. Try eating more dark green leafy veggies, smaller amounts of fruit and eating nuts, seeds, etc in there to up fiber without the sugar and get some fats in there that way, If you eat meats stews, soups in large pots are going to be your friend for awhile easy, simple, cheap, and can be done in batches, and portioned off for a week at a time. Check out the 101 thread for more info, I think some of our EU members can help you more with finding products that I can, same with supplements. Cross contamination and chances your still eating gluten unknowingly are highly possible there is a HUGE learning curve refer to hte 101 thread for more info. That covers the basics. welcome to the club? https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/91878-newbie-info-101/  
    • Think about this.  I have only had my daughter tested for celiac disease.  She tested negative.  She will need to be retested sometime in the future or when symptoms develop.  But genetic testing?  This might impact her insurability in terms of health and life.  I do not have the answers, but I would research this before having everyone tested.  Some 40% of the population carries the genes to develop celiac disease.  Only a very few actually develop it.  Insurance companies will deny you for all kinds of lame reasons.  Just be careful. 
    • I think for adults who are disabled or have really low incomes, they should be allowed to keep their Rx.  But anyone else who is an adult and has a job, they should pay their own way.  There are so many options available in the UK now and their gluten-free options are really good.  You have better bread than we do in the States and the cost in many instances is lower than it is here.
  • Upcoming Events