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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Favorite Gluten Free Cookbook/website/blog
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Does anyone have a favorite gluten free cookbook, website or blog that they use for recipes?  I have tried to recipes from glutenfreegoddess and both were so good.  I grabbed 2 cookbooks at the library.  1 had no pictures...I'm super visual so I took that right back.  The other has yummy looking recipes, but everything with flour has 4-6 different flours/starches.  A bit overwhelming.

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You might do better buying a flour mix.  Like Pamela's.  They will have recipes on the bag and on their websites. I have used the Pamelas when a recipe calls for a spoonful or 2 of regular flour to thicken.   Or buy a mix, like Chebe focaccia and use  it for other things.  They have recipes on their websites/FB pages.  I made little balls with moz and Italian sausage and dip them in pasta sauce for Super Bowl last night.

 

 

Betty Crocker has gluten-free recipes that use the gluten-free Bisquick and the other gluten-free mixes.

 

http://www.bettycrocker.com/recipes/gluten-free-cheese-garlic-biscuits/781e1a42-c051-4ab9-bd5e-ac38c7588bc0  

 

Chebe:

 

http://recipes.chebe.com/

 

http://www.365daysofcrockpot.com/

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I use flour blends like Pamela's too. I just convert gluten recipes over to gluten-free. I have not made yeast breads though. During this past year, I have tried to keep it simple. I just did not have the energy. Now that I do,I am catching up on home projects and sewing in my spare time.

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Does anyone have a favorite gluten free cookbook, website or blog that they use for recipes?  I have tried to recipes from glutenfreegoddess and both were so good.  I grabbed 2 cookbooks at the library.  1 had no pictures...I'm super visual so I took that right back.  The other has yummy looking recipes, but everything with flour has 4-6 different flours/starches.  A bit overwhelming.

I have thru time used my own recipes and adjusted as I have tried them.  I have used Bob's mill all purpose baking flour.  That has seemed to work for me.  I live in a smaller town & do not have a lot of grocery options to choose from, but that one is available.

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I went to the store and bought a bunch of individual flours...maybe I should take them back and just get all purpose. I'm fairly sure I'm over thinking this.

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No, you are not over thinking this. Different baked goods require different flour mixes to get the best results and some folks have allergies or intolerances so they might need to avoid ingredients like potato, etc. that are lumped into a flour mix.

For me, it was easier and I get good results for cobblers, cakes, cookies. I have not attempted bake bread because 1) I baked all my own bread prior to my dx and 2) I still remember really good bread and 3) it taken me a long time to feel up to baking after all the cooking I have to do!

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In terms of blogs, I really like Elana's Pantry ( http://www.elanaspantry.com ) and Gluten Free on a Shoestring http://glutenfreeonashoestring.com ) for recipes and inspiration. Both of these lovely ladies also have cookbooks available. I also frequent a lot of paleo/primal cooking blogs (which are popping up everywhere now) as all the recipes are gluten free.

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I was tired of mixing flours for different recipes. I had little bags all over the place... and they are pricey! I went to Better Batter flour which already contains xanthan gum. It's all I use and I love it!! I also use Pamela's bread mix and my fave is Namaste pizza crust mix.

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I was tired of mixing flours for different recipes. I had little bags all over the place... and they are pricey! I went to Better Batter flour which already contains xanthan gum. It's all I use and I love it!! I also use Pamela's bread mix and my fave is Namaste pizza crust mix.

Thanks for that info. I went out and bought like 5 different flours plus xanthan gum. It was ridiculously expensive. I don't think I will do that again.
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There are so many cooking blogs that I semi regularly follow, some gluten-free and some not.  The place I find the most new blogs at is actually on facebook- someone I already follow will post something from somewhere else, and I go to the source and realize I like it.  A lot of the gluten-free organizations will post stuff from bloggers as well, so if you use facebook go like all the celiac stuff you can find and you can get some great information that way.

 

When I was first diagnosed, I went to my local library and checked out every book that had to do with being gluten-free and combed through them all.  My city library is connected to a larger area where you can go on the catalog and request a book from somewhere else.  It really helped me when I first started out because some of those books would have been a waste of time and money.  Others were better.  

 

My favorite food blog actually isnt a gluten-free blog, but it has great basic cooking stuff on there that tends to stay on the healthier but realistic side.  http://www.101cookingfortwo.com/

A lot of the gluten-free blogs seem to have a ton of advertisement and product promotion so I don't really have one that stands out.  I have facebook set up to show all their posts to my newsfeed and I will go read if they post something interesting.

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We went gluten-free last April due to my daughter's celiac diagnosis, and I, too, was very confused about the flour blends. It seems that every cookbook I bought or checked out of the library called for something different. My suggestion is to find a book you like and go with that blend to start - either a purchased one they recommend or one you blend yourself.

 

My first best purchase was 1000 Gluten Free recipes by Carol Fenster. It's my "go to' for all sorts of things, from marinades to funnel cake batter! Everything we tried from there was good.

 

Then I purchased a bunch of Jules Gluten Free Flour and used that in any recipe, and it was good.

Then I discovered GlutenFreeOnAShoestring.com and everything I have made from there is WONDERFUL!  She recommends mostly Better Batter flour blend, but provides "copycat" flour mix recipes. She came out with a Bakes Bread cookbook in December that has changed our lives. I made baguettes last night, and they were fabulous!

 

So....my best advice is to find one cookbook author/blog you like and go with that. It's so confusing otherwise...

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Store the flours and the Xanthan gum in airtight containers and it will last you a long time!

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Store the flours and the Xanthan gum in airtight containers and it will last you a long time!

Especially when stored in the refrigerator, or better yet, the freezer.

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Here are some of my favorite blogs: someone mentioned Elana's Pantry - love her site because all her recipes are easy and don't require a lot of ingredients (she does usually only use one flour).  Www.Lillianstestkitchen.com has fun cooking videos.  I also love www.chocolatecoveredkatie.com.  It's not strictly gluten free but most of her recipes have the adjustments listed.  Couple others: www.realsustenance.com, www.paleomg.com, and www.detoxinista.com, www.spunkycoconut.com.

 

Like others have said, I really like Pamela's baking mixes.  I used one in my bread machine today and it came out amazing.  Also use her muffin mix a lot.  I get them in bulk from Amazon. 

 

For cookbooks, I use all of Elana's Pantry a lot.  I also really like Paleo Indulgences.  

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Here are some of my favorite blogs: someone mentioned Elana's Pantry - love her site because all her recipes are easy and don't require a lot of ingredients (she does usually only use one flour). Www.Lillianstestkitchen.com has fun cooking videos. I also love www.chocolatecoveredkatie.com. It's not strictly gluten free but most of her recipes have the adjustments listed. Couple others: www.realsustenance.com, www.paleomg.com, and www.detoxinista.com, www.spunkycoconut.com.

Like others have said, I really like Pamela's baking mixes. I used one in my bread machine today and it came out amazing. Also use her muffin mix a lot. I get them in bulk from Amazon.

For cookbooks, I use all of Elana's Pantry a lot. I also really like Paleo Indulgences.

Thanks for all the great ideas! I'm going to take a look at these today.
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The Dairy-free and Gluten-free Kitchen by Denise Jardine is amazing! I like that nothing processed is called for but if you have a milk sub you buy or stock you purchase and like you can use it and its full of great tasting recipes even my non gluten-free fammily loves it!

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Especially when stored in the refrigerator, or better yet, the freezer.

Thanks! I forgot to include freezer! My big freezer in the garage is one of the best investments I have made!

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Even after all this time gluten free I keep it very very simple.

 

I stick with mostly paleo/ simple ( meaning very few  basic ingredients ) recpies

 

I am intolerant of so many things buying  pre mixed flours is not an option

 

Food for life organic rice tortillas are about as fancy as I get :P:D

 

Do I miss bread/pastrys /ect... some times but my reaction is so severe  that I do not risk my health

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I did the same thing as you when I was first diagnosed . . . got a bunch of gluten-free cookbooks from the library.  The ingredient lists were crazy long and included all kinds of flours . . . it felt more like a science experiment than a recipe.

 

I found many more "friendly" recipes in Paleo cookbooks and even Low Carb cookbooks . . . 

 

I use Pamela's blend for general cooking (and pancakes) and I use Betty Crocker mixes when I want a baked dessert.  Otherwise, we now have more puddings, cheesecakes, and things like that for dessert.

 

If you use a crockpot, the "Make it Fast, Cook it Slow" cookbooks are GREAT.  Every recipe just happens to be gluten free because the author's daughter has Celiac.  They don't have any weird ingredients in it at all.

 

http://crockpot365.blogspot.com

 

The most annoying thing is the gluten-free cookbooks that have recipes for things like "grilled cheese sandwich" (use gluten-free bread!) and lasagna (use gluten-free noodles!)   Who can't figure that out?  I want recipes that just happen to be gluten free . . .

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I did the same thing as you when I was first diagnosed . . . got a bunch of gluten-free cookbooks from the library.  The ingredient lists were crazy long and included all kinds of flours . . . it felt more like a science experiment than a recipe. I found many more "friendly" recipes in Paleo cookbooks and even Low Carb cookbooks . . .  I use Pamela's blend for general cooking (and pancakes) and I use Betty Crocker mixes when I want a baked dessert.  Otherwise, we now have more puddings, cheesecakes, and things like that for dessert. If you use a crockpot, the "Make it Fast, Cook it Slow" cookbooks are GREAT.  Every recipe just happens to be gluten free because the author's daughter has Celiac.  They don't have any weird ingredients in it at all. http://crockpot365.blogspot.com The most annoying thing is the gluten-free cookbooks that have recipes for things like "grilled cheese sandwich" (use gluten-free bread!) and lasagna (use gluten-free noodles!)   Who can't figure that out?  I want recipes that just happen to be gluten free . . .

Thanks for all the info...great ideas. I bought a bunch of flours and I don't even know what to do with them. Millet...Quinoa...Coconut and potato starch. And all I ever use is the all purpose.
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    • I am very interested in this too. My daughter tested negative for celiac, but has terrible primarily neurological symptoms. Because she tested positive for SIBO at the time and was having some GI symptoms, I was told it was just a Fodmap issue.  I knew better and we have been gluten free for 2 years.  Fast forward to this February. She had a SIBO recurrence that I treated at home with diet and herbal antibiotics because I couldn't get the insurance referral. She was doing great. Then stupid me brought in gluten containing chick feed for the new baby chicks we got.   Feed dust everywhere. Total mess.  Really, no GI symptoms (she was SIBO free by then)...but the neurological symptoms! my daughter couldn't walk for three days. Burning down one leg, nerve pain in the foot. Also heaviness of limbs, headache and fatigue. Better after three days. But unfortunately she had a TINY gluten exposure at that three day mark and had another severe reaction: loss of balance, loss of feeling in her back and arms, couldn't see for a few seconds, and three days of hand numbness, fatigue, concentration problems.  Well, I actually contacted Dr. Hadjivassilou by email and he confirmed that the symptoms are consistent with gluten ataxia but any testing would require a gluten challenge. Even with these exposures, antibodies would not be high enough.  His suggestion was maintain vigilance gluten free.  I just saw my daughter's GI at U of C and she really only recognizes celiac disease and neurological complications of that. But my impression is that gluten ataxia is another branch in the autoimmune side of things (with celiac and DH being the other two).   At this point, I know a diagnosis is important. But I don't know how to get there. We homeschool right now so I can give her time to heal when she is accidentally glutened, I can keep my home safe for her (ugh, that I didn't think of the chicken feed!)  But at some point, she is going to be in college, needing to take exams, and totally incapacitated because of an exposure.  And doctors state side that are worth seeing?  Who is looking at gluten ataxia in the US?
    • Caro..............monitoring only the TSH to gauge thyroid function is what endo's do who don' t do a good job of managing thyroid disease.  They should do the full panel and check the actual thyroid hormone numbers.........T3 and T4. The importance of the TSH comes second to hormone levels. In order to track how severely the thyroid is under attack, you need to track antibody levels.......not the TSH. I did not stay with endocrinologists because I found they did not do a very good job and found much greater help and results with a functional medicine MD.  You should not have a goiter if your thyroid is functioning well and your TSH is "normal".  Maybe they should do a full panel? Going gluten free can have a profound affect for the better on thyroid function and that is something that is becoming more and more accepted today.  Ask most people with Celiac and thyroid disease and they will tell you that. My thyroid never functioned well or was under control under after I discovered I had Celiac and went gluten free.  It was the only way I got my antibody numbers back down close to normal and they were around 1200 when it was diagnosed with Celiac.  I was diagnosed with Hashi's long before the Celiac diagnosis.  I am not sure Vitamin D has anything to do with thyroid antibodies but who knows?  Maybe it does have an affect for the better. It is really hard to get Vitmain D levels up, depending on where you live. Mine are going up, slowly, even after 12 years gluten-free but I live in the Northeast in the US and we don't have sun levels like they do in the South.  I take 5,000 IU daily and that is a safe level to take, believe it or not.  I get no sun on my job so the large dose it is! Having Celiac Disease should not stop you from being able to travel, especially S. America. I travel, although I do agree that some countries might be very difficult to be gluten free in. You can be a foodie and travel with Celiac so no worries on that front. You may not be able to sample from someone else's plate, unless they are eating gluten-free too but I have had awesome experiences with food when traveling so you can too!
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    • Hi Stephanie, I'm also from the UK, I've found this site more helpful than anything we have!  As already mentioned above, in my experience it could depend on what and where you were drinking. Gluten free food and drink isn't always (not usually) 100% gluten free as you may know, maybe you have become more sensitive to even a trace of gluten that is probably in gluten free food/drink. Is it possible you have a problem with corn, particularly high fructose corn syrup that is in a lot of alcoholic drinks? This was a big problem for me and the only alcoholic drinks I can tolerate are William Chase vodka and gin. I contacted the company last year and all their drinks are 100% gluten and corn free, made the old fashioned way with no additives, so maybe try their products if you like the occasional drink and see how you get on. If you drink out, not many pubs sell their products but I know Wetherspoons do and smaller wine bars may too. l was never a spirit drinker but I must say their products are absolutely lovely! Very easy on a compromised gut too considering it's alcohol. I second the suggestion on seeing a natural health practitioner. I've recently started seeing a medical herbalist, as I've got nowhere with my now many food intolerances since going gluten free last year and I've noticed a difference in my health already. 
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