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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

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31 posts in this topic

I've been overseas plenty of times, and have two adapters, but I'm concerned I'll blow up my rice cooker using one. I had an immersion boiler that I ruined trying to use in Europe with one of those...

 

But thanks for the advice. I'll definitely go with a bag full of food - just in case.

 

Yeah, just to let you know - an adapter just makes the plug fit into a socket - it doesn't change the voltage. As you have found, the voltage in Europe is generally higher than the US (My American friends fritzed their stuff too). You need a device that actually converts the voltage, called a "step-down transformer". Like this:

 

http://uk.rs-online.com/web/p/product/4784689/?grossPrice=Y&cm_mmc=UK%7CShopping-_-Google+PLA-_-OEP%7CPlug+In+Power+Supply-_-4784689&kpid=&istCompanyId=f7e7b05b-2daf-4c0e-8825-3633baf8113b&istItemId=xwilpaipx&istBid=tzit&gclid=CLSd0v6iwrwCFUj4wgod0VcAJQ

 

Have fun!

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bring gluten-free cereal, crackers & a loaf of bread! Pretty much anywhere you go you should be able to pop in and find some cheese or meats. I've actually heard really good things about traveling europe gluten free, so you should be fine. I think there is even a whole section about it on glutenfreeglobtrotter

 

Let us know how it goes! I'm planning my first trip out of the U.S. right now, so I'm ready to hear better ideas than just live off of sandwiches! 

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bless your little heart (says the 48 year old)  :)

 

Oh honey.....whenever you are on the other side of a number, the lower one is YOUNG. ;)

 

My 87- year- old mother (who is probably healthier than all of us, goes to the gym and does the stair master and cardio-kick boxing and

can rake leaves without huffing and puffing--and yeah, I ave often thought maybe I was adopted, but I am not) lol

 

says "Age is mind over matter. If you don't mind, it doesn't matter"

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Where exactly are you going in Europe? There are many really great gluten-free brands available all across Europe. You can usually find these in large supermarkets, health stores and even pharmacies. Great brands include Dr.Schär, Glutano, Hammermühle, Finax, Procelli etc. The two really big ones that I've been able to find across Europe have been Schär and Glutano. They have a whole range of products that are not only gluten-free but also lactose-free.

Here is a gluten-free travel guide on where to get certain products and at which stores all across Europe! http://www.coeliac.gr/library/downloads/Docs/Documents/Travel_Guide_Coeliac_Youth_of_Europe.pdf

:D Don't fear travelling because of gluten. Embrace it. Just stay away from foods that you are not sure of! You may not be able to try some of the local foods but in the end it's not really worth it. Good luck & have fun!

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Berlin,

That is a great guide! thanks for posting!

Cheers.

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I spent 5 months earlier this year living abroad. It's actually way easier than the United States, depending on where you go - their labeling rules may be better, food less processed, and restaurants in larger cities pretty good about gluten free items. 

 

If you're smart about it it shouldn't be a problem. I did a lot of crazy s$#&/had a good time/I'm pretty sensitive

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