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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

How Does It Feel To Be Cured Of Celiacs, When You Finally Get Your Life Back?
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14 posts in this topic

Just curious of how it feels to get your life back after being sick and undiagonosed with Celiacs, long term? How does it feel to get healthy again?

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It feels great to feel "normal", of course.

 

I just want to address the title  as I don't want you to have any misconceptions.  Celiac is not "cured".  You have it for the rest of your life. You must eat gluten-free for the rest of your life.  You may feel "cured" but you can never stop treating your "illness". Unlike other chronic illnesses,  the treatment isn't dangerous.  The illness doesn't progress on the gluten-free diet.   :D

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I have to echo Karen's thoughts about the word "cure".

There are really no "complete cures" for autoimmune diseases, but there are treatments that put symptoms into

remission. We're lucky that it's the gluten free diet and not a medication or treatment that has horrible side effects

and we have an excellent chance of recovery provided we remain G F and address any deficiences, etc.

 

For me, it took a long time to feel good. But honestly, I was very ill at diagnosis,

so even though I have joint and connective tissue issues

as a result of going undiagnosed for so long, I am so much better

than I was,my brain works again,  I can do more (physically) than I could for a long time 

and I sleep through the night for the first time in my life. And I do not live in the bathroom anymore. (yaay!)

 

So, in a way, it feels like a whole new life. :)  whoohoo!

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as kareng and irishheart have already said no cure but  a forever treatment. I am good with that :)

I dont know if any one that knows me would call me normal in any way :P:lol: :lol:  but knowing that my hard work in adhering to a gluten free diet has  returned my gut to  "normal" ( well as normal as I will ever get :lol: :lol: ) is priceless :D

 

I ( as Irish) was undiagnosed for a very very long time, the damage from untreated long term celiacs can be tremendous ,, even life threatening ,,

The complications  of being undiagnosed,, there for untreated  ( additional intolerances ,gluten ataxia ,  additional autoimmune diseases ect ) is what I am  dealing with  long after my celiacs is under control.

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I don't feel cured either. I am not back to great health yet, and I honestly doubt I ever will be - too many permanent health problems were created by decades of a missed diagnosis. I may no longer have to carry an extra sweater to hide my bloat after I eat, but my thyroid still doesn't work, I still have an autoimmune blood disease, arthritis is still there (although much less), and a few other areas are still out of whack.

I feel better than I did, but far from cured.

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I feel so much better it is ridiculous.  I am carrying some damages though and still gathering inventory about it.  There wasn't a day that I said, "Oh, now I am better!"  There were many days I did feel that way.  It feels good to have a clear mind and energy.

 

D

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  There wasn't a day that I said, "Oh, now I am better!"  There were many days I did feel that way. .

 

D

yeap :)

 

it is not 'one day you feel like crap and the next day you are normal again never to be ill again'

 

it is  slow process ,after awhile you realize you are having more good days then bad, ,,,that you feel so good that a bad day can blind side you but good days come again , & again & again :wub:

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Thanks. Sorry, I should have worded it better. I know there is no cure but unlike many other autoimmune, there is at least a way to repair to some degree and feel better. You can't do that with let’s say Rheumatoid Arthritis or Fibromyalgia. With those there is no real end, no relief that actually fixes something, only band-aids. As I understand it, removing gluten from your diet actually repairs you somewhat and that has to feel better at least!

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Thanks. Sorry, I should have worded it better. I know there is no cure but unlike many other autoimmune, there is at least a way to repair to some degree and feel better. You can't do that with let’s say Rheumatoid Arthritis or Fibromyalgia. With those there is no real end, no relief that actually fixes something, only band-aids. As I understand it, removing gluten from your diet actually repairs you somewhat and that has to feel better at least!

 

Yes, removing gluten allows your small intestine to heal which allows your body to absorb all the nutrients needed to improve symptoms present throughout the body...not just the digestive system :)

 

Added bonus....many that remove gluten have marked improvement in symptoms of ALL autoimmune disorders - RA and Fibro included.

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....and some discover they never even had "fibro" or thyroid disease or clinical depression or

incurable insomnia, or ..., or...(fill in the blank)  .....at all....celiac is the great mimic.

 

See how your body heals and be patient. My motto:  "every day is a healing day".

Edited by IrishHeart
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yep, what she said :D

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It feels wonderful to not be in pain every day. I do still have a lot of damage that came about because of the long time it took for me to be diagnosed and it did take years to get to the point where I could live a semi-normal life. However it also makes me a bit sad when I think of all I missed out on with raising my children. My poor kids grew up with a mother who was slowly dieing in front of them. One of them as a teen even told me the family would understand if I committed suicide. No child should have to go through that. It also makes me sad that they never got to know the 'real' me as I wasn't diagnosed until they were almost fully grown.

Thankfully doctors are getting a bit more savvy about diagnosing us so hopefully there are fewer and fewer people living with having to watch a loved one suffer so greatly.

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I'm lucky in that I think I was diagnosed only a few years after problems began, that although looking back I can see I was ill, I didn't really have anything dramatic going on at the time of diagnosis (again, lucky to see an attentive GP!) and that other than the usual anaemia I didn't have any other AI illnesses. 

However, six months in and the difference certainly feels massive. Souped up version of the old me about covers it! As well as having more energy and a better mood generally I notice it in the sports training I do - I'm finally getting back what I put in, rather than just exhausting myself. Watch out world ;) 

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I'm lucky in that I think I was diagnosed only a few years after problems began, that although looking back I can see I was ill, I didn't really have anything dramatic going on at the time of diagnosis (again, lucky to see an attentive GP!) and that other than the usual anaemia I didn't have any other AI illnesses. 

However, six months in and the difference certainly feels massive. Souped up version of the old me about covers it! As well as having more energy and a better mood generally I notice it in the sports training I do - I'm finally getting back what I put in, rather than just exhausting myself. Watch out world ;)

 

That's exactly how I feel.  I was asymptomatic when I was diagnosed but since being gluten free my mood is better, I sleep better, and I can get in a really really good work out and come out feeling strong instead of beat-up.  For not knowing anything was wrong with me before the difference is pretty amazing.

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