• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Celiac.com E-Newsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsCeliac.com E-Newsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Gluten Free Hair Dye
0

30 posts in this topic

Hi All, I am new to this forum & first time posting.

I have celiac disease, its been almost 2 years.  I now have a handle on what I can & can't eat and if I'm unsure then I won't touch it.

 

However, I'm in need of some tips on gluten-free Hair Dye.  I'm one of those very sensitive Celiac's and have breathing issues walking through the bakery isle of my local supermarket.   I'm looking for a safe and gluten free hair dye.  Apologies if this question has already been asked on here.

 

I live in Dubai, so our products are limited to those available in the USA.

 

Thanks for any tips!

L

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


Welcome to the forum, Linzi!  I moved your topic to a special section we have for Celiacs who are super sensitive, so you can get some insight from others who have the same sensitivity problems as you.  I am not sure on the hair dye thing but I am sure some of our ladies will be able to help you out! :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to the board. I have used Garneir Nutritionesse (not sure I got the spelling correct) and have also used Herbatint. You may want to do a board search for other brands. I don't know why this topic got moved and hope you get other replies and are able to find your post. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i use whatever's on sale.  (garnier nutriesse, nice n easy, olia, i know i have used)  i just don't rinse it in the shower like i used to.  i either rinse in the bathtub with a cup or in the sink under the tap.  but i don't get sick from walking down the bread aisle.  which is why you are super sensitive, i suppose, and other supers may have a better answer for you than the general celiac population.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am super sensitive to gluten and oats.  It is really hard to tell what is making you sick, especially when it happens often, like has been a problem for me.  I figured, why add another possibility?  It just confuses things further.  By now I'm well much of the time, but I got used to the grey.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


I will never be gray. I refuse, :)

 

I go to the salon and have my hair colored. Totally worth it. Lasts much  longer and I have never had a reaction of any kind and I am pretty

sensitive to trace CC. 

 

when I could not get there for some reason, I have used Garnier. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will never be gray. I refuse, :)

 

I go to the salon and have my hair colored. Totally worth it. Lasts much  longer and I have never had a reaction of any kind and I am pretty

sensitive to trace CC. 

 

when I could not get there for some reason, I have used Garnier.

Thanks for your replies guys. I had hoped for lots of options but maybe my post isn't been seen by the wider gluten-free community.

Can it be moved ???

Irishheart: which garnier dye was it? There are many variations?

I need to get it right - the symptoms are too severe if I get caught out!

Thanks again

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for your replies guys. I had hoped for lots of options but maybe my post isn't been seen by the wider gluten-free community.

Can it be moved ???

Irishheart: which garnier dye was it? There are many variations?

I need to get it right - the symptoms are too severe if I get caught out!

Thanks again

You say you are super sensitive. That is a very small percentage of Celiacs. What most Celiacs use or eat won't work for you. That is why you haven't gotten many answers. For me, it's no big deal what's in the dye as I don't get it in my mouth. But I don't think of my self as "super sensitive".

I would think you would need to call and quiz the manufacturers of various brands you might want to use? Perhaps, as was suggested, dyeing your hair is too risky?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for your replies guys. I had hoped for lots of options but maybe my post isn't been seen by the wider gluten-free community.

Can it be moved ???

 

Your topic can be seen by everyone.  Most Celiacs do not have a topical reaction to gluten and only have to worry about gluten getting in their mouth.  So putting your post in the super sensitive category (which you are) lets people know so it prevents the huge number of replies that would tell you that you don't have to worry about gluten-free hair dye unless you are getting it in your mouth.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for your replies guys. I had hoped for lots of options but maybe my post isn't been seen by the wider gluten-free community.

Can it be moved ???

Irishheart: which garnier dye was it? There are many variations?

I need to get it right - the symptoms are too severe if I get caught out!

Thanks again

 

 

I was mistaken about the brand. So sorry. It was L'Oreal. This one:

 

http://www.drugstore.com/products/prod.asp?pid=149741&catid=183846&cmbProdBrandFilter=120014&aid=338666&aparam=149741&kpid=149741

 

Hon, honestly, unless you have a topical wheat allergy, something applied to your skin or scalp, in this case, should not be an issue.

You are not going to swallow it and even if there were any form of minute gluten particle in the solution, it would be so remote that it

could in any way "gluten you". You should be fine!

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am topically sensitive to gluten.  I made the mistake of using a Wen hair product, which has hydrolyzed wheat protein clearly on the label.  I wanted to scratch my scalp off for days.  I had instantly bad dandruff.  I thought I was going to have to duct tape oven mitts onto my hands to keep from scratching my head until it bled.  But it's important to note that I did not have any other symptoms...nothing involving pain, fog, fatigue or gastro upset like I normally get.  Only the topical reaction.  Luckily for me I did not swallow any or I would have had to take a 48 hour nap.  I have heard that Garnier Nutrisse hair dyes are all considered gluten-free.  Unfortunately, I haven't tested any of them myself.  Sorry I couldn't be more help but please, update us if you find a product that works for you.  Best of luck!  :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am topically sensitive to gluten.  I made the mistake of using a Wen hair product, which has hydrolyzed wheat protein clearly on the label.  I wanted to scratch my scalp off for days.  I had instantly bad dandruff.  I thought I was going to have to duct tape oven mitts onto my hands to keep from scratching my head until it bled.  But it's important to note that I did not have any other symptoms...nothing involving pain, fog, fatigue or gastro upset like I normally get.  Only the topical reaction.  Luckily for me I did not swallow any or I would have had to take a 48 hour nap.  I have heard that Garnier Nutrisse hair dyes are all considered gluten-free.  Unfortunately, I haven't tested any of them myself.  Sorry I couldn't be more help but please, update us if you find a product that works for you.  Best of luck!  :)

 

Not to wander off topic here, but I tried a Wen shampoo and wish I could have all that money back. That stuff is awful. It made my hair flat,

dull and it looked like it was full of grease. I was so disappointed after seeing all the rave reviews about it. I have no idea why people say it's fantastic. Might as well just rub hand lotion in you hair and get the same result.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had the same thing with the Wen Shampoo, flat and dull.  Never have tried anything as bad as that one.

 

Colleen

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was mistaken about the brand. So sorry. It was L'Oreal. This one:

 

http://www.drugstore.com/products/prod.asp?pid=149741&catid=183846&cmbProdBrandFilter=120014&aid=338666&aparam=149741&kpid=149741

 

Hon, honestly, unless you have a topical wheat allergy, something applied to your skin or scalp, in this case, should not be an issue.

You are not going to swallow it and even if there were any form of minute gluten particle in the solution, it would be so remote that it

could in any way "gluten you". You should be fine!

 

 

Thanks for the link …  but when I open and read it states many gluten ingredients…. Is this the link you wanted to send ?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the link …  but when I open and read it states many gluten ingredients…. Is this the link you wanted to send ?

Yes.

The only mention is "Hydrolyzed wheat" which is not an issue in topical products for people with celiac. You are not eating it.

Don't use it if you are worried about it, but it never bothered me.

 

The experts say this(below) but again, if it bothers you, don't use it. 

 

Several celiac experts (Dr. Peter Green - Celiac Disease Center at Columbia Univ., Dr. Stephano Guandalini - Univ. of Chicago Celiac Disease Center, Dr. Alessio Fasano - Univ. of Maryland Center for Celiac Research) say not to worry about gluten in hair/skin care products because the gluten must be consumed in order for it to cause a celiac reaction [villi damage]. Their reasoning, based on scientific evidence - size matters. The gluten proteins are simply too large to be absorbed by your body's largest organ - your skin.

Did you know - skin makes up about 16% of your body weight?

Cynthia Kupper, RD, Executive Director of the Gluten Intolerance Group of North America says:

 

"While investigating the possible absorption of gluten through the skin, I have talked with many regulatory organizations, and research and development people in the cosmetic industry. They all agree that gluten and all proteins are too large to be absorbed through the skin. Therefore, topical care products that contain gluten do not need to be avoided by persons with
celiac disease
and DH."

Source:

According to Dr. Alessio Fasano, Medical Director of the Center for Celiac Research, University of Maryland, 

 

“If you have celiac disease, then the application of gluten containing products to the skin should not be a problem, unless you have skin lesions that allow gluten to be absorbed systemically in great quantities.

Source: 

Tricia Thompson, RD – The Gluten-Free Dietitian says:

 

"The bottom line: There is no scientific evidence that the use of gluten-containing products that are not ingested is harmful to persons with celiac disease. This includes individuals with dermatitis herpetiformis. 

Source:

Doug Schoon, President of Schoon Scientific (scientific consulting for the cosmetics industry) - 

 

"There is no scientific evidence to support claims that gluten can absorb through the skin. The burden of proof should be on those who make these statements. They should provide credible scientific evidence to back this unlikely claim. 

What makes gluten unlikely to absorb? Substances with molecular weights (sizes) approaching 500 daltons are considered very poor skin penetrators because they are so large. Any bigger, they can’t possibly absorb into the skin, so they just sit on the surface. Gluten is huge — about 600 daltons — which is pretty monstrous; 15% larger than the theoretical maximum size. 

Also, gluten is a protein and so is skin. Protein is attracted to proteins, so gluten is likely to bond tightly to skin making it more difficult to penetrate. So it has two things going against it. This is just another example of an unfounded cosmetic myth used to frighten people. The same holds true for lipstick. There is little scientific study that supports the notion that gluten in lipstick is a problem for people with Celiac disease."

Source:

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IrishHeart is absolutely right and has furnished a lot of great links to make her point.  It's true that Celiacs specifically don't react topically to products containing wheat.  For a Celiac, products containing gluten are fine as long as they're never going in or near your mouth.  This is not to say, however, that someone may not have a wheat allergy apart from or in addition to Celiac or NCGS.  A true allergy to wheat (not oral consumption of gluten that fuels an autoimmune disease) can create a topical reaction, even on unbroken skin.  This could be part of the reason she considers herself "super sensitive", because the majority of even severe Celiacs on this forum aren't going to care whether or not the hair dye that they use maybe once a month has wheat in it.  That being said, if you don't have a wheat allergy and you have Celiac or NCGS, you may find that a dye with wheat derivatives will work just fine for you.  I can only tell you from personal experience that not everyone will tolerate it as well as the majority does.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is why I always say...do what's best for you. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What does this mean?

Copied from Irishheart's post:

 

"Source:
http://www.glutenfre...y-about-gluten/

According to Dr. Alessio Fasano, Medical Director of the Center for Celiac Research, University of Maryland, 
 

“If you have celiac disease, then the application of gluten containing products to the skin should not be a problem, unless you have skin lesions that allow gluten to be absorbed systemically in great quantities.""

 

Does that mean that there is scientific evidence for absorbtion of gluten with skin lesions?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What does this mean?

Copied from Irishheart's post:

 

"Source:

http://www.glutenfre...y-about-gluten/

According to Dr. Alessio Fasano, Medical Director of the Center for Celiac Research, University of Maryland, 

 

“If you have celiac disease, then the application of gluten containing products to the skin should not be a problem, unless you have skin lesions that allow gluten to be absorbed systemically in great quantities.""

 

Does that mean that there is scientific evidence for absorbtion of gluten with skin lesions?

I have never seen any myself but I think this is significant....he says 

 

"systemically in great quantities "...I don't know what that means really...how would that even happen?

 

 That's a question for Dr, Fasano, I think. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Systemically would be into your body.  For example, lets say you have a skin condition like psoriasis or another condition that can give you open sores all over the body.  Those open sores are now a gateway through your skin that is not normally there.  At that point you really shouldn't put anything on those sore that wasn't designed to be put on them, because topical products are not meant to be introduced to your internal body system.  

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Systemically would be into your body.  For example, lets say you have a skin condition like psoriasis or another condition that can give you open sores all over the body.  Those open sores are now a gateway through your skin that is not normally there.  At that point you really shouldn't put anything on those sore that wasn't designed to be put on them, because topical products are not meant to be introduced to your internal body system.  

 

 

lol

No, I know what the words "systematically" and "in great quantities" means ^_^  what I am not sure of is how gluten could possibly be

administered "in great quantities" via the skin into open lesions. seems strange...Someone is going to roll around in wheat flour?

 

How is that possible since the gluten molecule is too large to pass through skin?

I have tried to figure this out...... Say you have open lesions galore...in what FORM

would gluten be administered to create a gut response? It just does not make sense and I have always been perplexed by this statement from Dr. Fasano.

 

Again, maybe we should write to Dr. F and ask him to clarify. Seriously, because there is NO evidence that gluten can pass through the skin

and somehow end up in  the bloodstream.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

lol

No, I know what the words "systematically" and "in great quantities" means ^_^  what I am not sure of is how gluten could possibly be

administered "in great quantities" via the skin into open lesions. seems strange...Someone is going to roll around in wheat flour?

 

How is that possible since the gluten molecule is too large to pass through skin?

I have tried to figure this out...... Say you have open lesions galore...in what FORM

would gluten be administered to create a gut response? It just does not make sense and I have always been perplexed by this statement from Dr. Fasano.

 

Again, maybe we should write to Dr. F and ask him to clarify. Seriously, because there is NO evidence that gluten can pass through the skin

and somehow end up in  the bloodstream.

 

 

Yep, what would you have to do, torture someone with a cutting device and then roll them in flour?  Okay, I need to stop this wild imagination!  LOL

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, what would you have to do, torture someone with a cutting device and then roll them in flour?  Okay, I need to stop this wild imagination!  LOL

 

too late.... Now I have an image of us all .. like a pounded piece of veal being coated in flour, dipped in egg and made into veal piccata.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HAHAHA!  That is exactly what vision I had in my head!   

 

<.<

 

 

>.>

 

<.<

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

too late.... Now I have an image of us all .. like a pounded piece of veal being coated in flour, dipped in egg and made into veal piccata.

 

talk about late...I walked into this thread and started with the last post

 

doh...I use whatever is on special at Target -- no problems to date -- and I might add I am not in need of dye nearly as often as prior to dx :D

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      106,417
    • Total Posts
      930,443
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      63,841
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    KerryAH
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • So, here goes...my visit with the GI specialist  is on Monday.  I had tested positive for the IGG antibody and all other bloodwork was negative.  I had numerous trips to emerg with stomach pain, lower back pain, tingly tummy, and diarrhea with alternating "c" (I had the word constipation).    One diagnosis of diverticulitis, another of IBS, and symptoms continued to get worse....Low B12 for 7 years and abnormal liver (something like hepatocellular disease with cirrhosis).  I only have a glass of wine on the weekends...I had been diagnosed in my early 30s with IBS and imodium helped.  I also had a rash on my elbows and back and that is when my new GP said maybe it is celiac and she sent me for bloodwork and 3 months later finally get to see the GI specialist.  I went gluten free and at first it was hard.  It is much easier now...I think at time I give myself contamination because I get some bouts of pain on occasion and I take buscopan and immodium and then I am fine....I am 100% convinced I have celiac but I guess I really do not understand how the rest of the panel would be negative... The rash, the GI symptoms, the B12, and the liver issue all paint a compelling picture...I never thought I would say this but I hope it is truly diagnosed because then I can move forward with a plan.  I am down 22 pounds and back at the gym very hard and feeling almost normal for the first time in many years....I also find is so strange that my "gluten" attack usuallys starts with a pins and needs tingly sensation in my back and tummy...I have written a full history and have copies of all my test results so the GI specialist takes me seriously...I read his reviews and they are not good....I understand I will have to do gluten before the endoscopy but that fine...just looking forward to this being partly over...Have a great day!  
    • http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/faqs/ You can also find lots of information on celiac at the University of Chicago celiac site.  One test they suggest is the anti EMA antibodies.  I don't see that one listed in her results.  Probably because it is more expensive to do.  So they may have skipped it.  The other test they usually do is the total serum IGA levels, which is used to prove that the person's immune system actually makes IgA antibodies.  Some people don't make IgA antibodies, so the IgA tests are useless in them. It looks to me like she makes IgA though, if this is the serum IgA result. IgA 133 mg/dl Reference range 33-200 There are also gene tests they can do.  The genes indicate the possibility of developing celiac disease, not the automatic presence of celiac disease.  About 30% of people in the USA have one of the genes for celiac disease, but only about 1% develop celiac disease. Some of the celiac genes are associated with other autoimmune conditions besides celiac disease.  So there are lists of AI associated conditions with celiac disease.  Sometimes called related conditions. http://www.drschaer-institute.com/us/celiac-disease/associated-conditions-1051.html
    • Blood was drawn this afternoon... they said I could get results tomorrow or even the next day! I also have a GI appt scheduled for June 9th. I am so glad I will have at least some kind of answer pretty soon. I'll let you all know. Thanks again for being so helpful!
    • Thank you so much for those links, I will check into it. Her pediatrician told me this afternoon she is wanting to repeat the bloodwork since that one test was elevated. I'm relieved that her pediatrician didn't dismiss it like the other dr in the practice did.
    • http://www.houstonceliacs.org/ https://www.csaceliacs.org/csa_chapter_25.jsp You can check with these groups to see if they recommend any doctors in Houston.
  • Upcoming Events