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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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In my relentless search to try to figure out my issue a few years ago, after trying a bunch of different exclusion diets in addition to gluten-free (soy, corn, dairy, nightshade vegetables, refined sugars, etc) I tried FODMAPs. It was more difficult than any of the other diets only in the sense that keeping all of the rules in your head is pretty hard. But it actually gives some flexibility to those accustomed to a gluten-free diet. I spent a long time looking at what was available from my local grocer and putting together a plan. I've included a shopping list and a menu for starting the FODMAP diet, below. I live in the USA and have seen these products in many stores in different states so I think this may be helpful. It is only worth noting that I made this a while ago so it may be worth checking in case ingredients in anything have changed. I hope maybe this will help someone. 

 

Here is the most complete list I could assemble from trusted sources.

 

The List 

("High goodbye, Low's good to go")

 

Vegetables:

 

High (excess fructose):

Sugar snap peas

Sweet Corn

 

High (excess fructan):

Artichoke
Asparagus
Beet

Brussel Sprout

Cabbage

Celery
Chicory
Dandelion leaf

Fennel

Garlic
Leek
Legumes/Pulses
Okra
Onion
Pea
Radicchio lettuce
Shallot
Spring onion (white part)

 

High (excess polyol):

Avocado
Cauliflower
Mushroom

Snow peas

Tamarillo

 

Low:

Alfalfa
Bamboo shoots
Bean sprout
Beans (green)

Bell pepper
Bok choy
Broccoli (+/-)
Carrot
Celery
Chives
Choy sum
Corn (+/-)
Cucumber
Endive
Eggplant (+/-)
Ginger
Lettuce (+/-)
Marrow
Olives
Parsnip

Parsley 
Potato
Pumpkin
Silverbeet
Spring onion (green section)
Spinach
Squash (+/-)
Swede
Sweet potato
Taro
Tomato 
Turnip
Yam
Zucchini (+/-)

 

Fruits:

 

High (excess fructose):

Apple
Mango
Nashi

Pear

Persimmon
Rambutan
Watermelon

 

High (excess fructan):

Persimmon
Rambutan
Watermelon

 

High (excess polyol):

Apple
Apricot
Avocado

Blackberry

Boysenberry
Cherry
Longonberry

Lychee

Nashi
Nectarine
Peach
Pear
Plum
Prune
Watermelon

 

Low:

Banana
Blueberry
Cantaloupe

Star fruit

Cranberry
Durian
Grapes 
Grapefruit
Honeydew melon
Kiwi
Lemon
Lime
Mandarin
Orange
Passion fruit
Paw paw
Pineapple

Raisens
Raspberry
Rhubarb

Strawberry

Tangelo

 

Dairy:

 

High:

Cream

Ice Cream

Milk

Milk Solids

Sour Cream

Yogurt (+/-)

 

Low:

Aged Cheese

Clarified Butter

Lactose-free milk

Lactose-free yogurt 

 

Proteins:

 

High:

Legumes/pulses

Soy beans

 

Low:

Meats

Soybean extract

 

Sweeteners:

 

High:

Agave Nectar

Corn Syrup

Fructose

Fruisana

Honey
Inulin

Oligofructose

• isomalt, maltitol, mannitol, sorbitol, xylitol

 

Low:

Golden syrup
Treacle
Molasses

Maple syrup

• White, brown, raw & castor sugar (sucrose)

• nutrasweet, sucralose, aspartame, stevia, saccharine, tic tacs, minties, regular gum

 

Other:

 

High:

Gluten (wheat, barley, rye)

Butternut Squash

Cashew

Chocolate

Chick peas

Fig

Lentil

Pistachios

 

Low:

Almonds (+/-)

Tea, coffee, & herbal teas
Nuts & seeds (+/-)
Psyllium.
Rice bran

Pumpkin seeds

 

My suggestion is to print it out, highlight the ones that are a part of your regular diet, and put it somewhere you'll see when you're considering food (like on the fridge).

 

Examples of Terms:

 

Fermentable: The process through which gut bacteria degrade undigested carbohydrate to produce gases (hydrogen, methane and carbon dioxide).

 

Oligo-saccharides: Fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) found in wheat, rye, onions and garlic, Galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) found in legumes/pulses.

 

Di-saccharides: Lactose found in; milk, soft cheese, yogurts.

 

Mono-saccharides: Fructose (in excess of glucose) found in honey, apples, high fructose corn syrups.

 

Polyols: Sugar polyols (eg. sorbitol, mannitol) found in some fruit and vegetables and used as artificial sweeteners.

 

The Grocery List

 

1-Lactose-free milk (Lactaid, skim)
4-Lactose-free yogurts
1-Bread (Udi's white sandwich)
2-Cheeses (hard cheeses aged 90+ days)
2-Deli Meats (Applegate Farms Organics, roasted turkey breast, uncured slow baked ham)
1-Lettuce, romaine
1-Mustard (Grey Poupon, dijon)
1-Tea, peppermint
2-Juices (Simply limeade, Simply lemonade with Raspberry)
1-Carbonated beverage (San Pellegrino, orange)
2-Oatmeals (Glutenfreeda, strawberry and cranberry flavors)
1-Cereal (General Mills gluten-free Corn Chex)
1-Noodles (KaMe vermicelli)
1-Pasta (Schar, Tinkyada, NottaPasta or Jovial)
2-Meat cuts (100% bison, 100% pork)
2-Popsicles (Natural Choice, coconut and raspberry)
5-Potatoes
Assorted veg (cucumber, carrots, spinach...)
Assorted fruit (bananas, frozen blueberries, strawberries, oranges...)
2-Rice
1-Frozen Bagels (Joan's Great Bakes)
1-Pancake Mix (King Arthur Flour)
1-Soy Sauce (SanJ Tamari, gluten-free)
1-Syrup (100% Maple)
1-Polenta (Food Merchants Organic, Traditional Italian, roll)
1-Ginger (fresh, uncut) and other seasonings
 
I checked the ingredients on every package, and followed the list above. (NOTE: This was in 2013(?) things may have changed, be sure to recheck ingredients.) I also determined that canola/rapeseed is okay, whereas honey and locust beans (as ingredients) are not. Almonds seem to be borderline. 
 
The Meal Options
 
Breakfast:
cereal,
toast w/jam,
pancakes w/syrup,
oatmeal,
yogurt,
fruit
 
Lunch
cereal,
sandwich,
noodles,
bagel
 
Dinner:
sandwich,
noodles/stir-fry,
pasta,
rice+meat,
meat+veg
 
Snacks
fruit,
bagel,
popsicle,
cereal,
oatmeal,
toast,
yogurt,
tea
 
 I hope this is helpful to someone. 

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