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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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cristiana

A good diet for avoiding type 2 diabetes

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Hi everyone.  There is a lot in the press here in the UK about prediabetes and diabetes.  I am an apple shape, as opposed to a pear, which I gather puts me more at risk.  I have a lot of relatives with types 1 and 2 diabetes.  I was diagnosed with celiac disease three years ago and the diet has been going so well that I am now putting on weight - I realise I have been eating far too many nice goodies from the Gluten Free Cake Aisle at Marks & Spencers, etc.  

I had a bit of a shock this week as I have been very thirsty and as per usual started panicking so instead of doing that my neighbour encouraged me to see my doctor.  Good plan. The preliminary tests show no sugar in my urine; my blood glucose was high normal but I had just eaten.  She is sending me off for one of those HbaIC tests I think it is called just to be sure but she says she thinks I will be fine.  But to cut a long story short, I realise I have got to sort out this sweet tooth of mine. Wake up time!

But I am confused. I have been searching a lot on line and there seems to be such contradictory information.  Only this week there was a news item on the BBC about the argument for fewer carbs/full fat - and then Public Health England disputing it.  Then, to go back to the original argument, the BBC filmed a chap at the doctors who had cut his carbs and ate full fat (as well as healthy fruit & veg) and he had lost weight and come off his diabetes meds.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-36345768

I'm thinking prevention is better than cure so I wanted to know, can anyone recommend a website or book that sets out a sensible eating plan, tried and tested, that they have discovered.    Or just any tips?  And I should say - I do get hungry between meals and for many years have suffered from the shakes when I don't eat enough - what is good food to eat for snacking?

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Hi cristiana,

The paleo diet and the ketogenic diet would probably be helpful to read up on.  Snack on protein, not sugar and carbs.  You should have protein with every meal.  Protein reduces the meal total glycemic index and lengthens the time before you feel hungry again.   Sugar and carbs shorten the time to feeling hungry again.

Or you could just ignore the whole thing and eat lots of sugary foods and carbs like my brother does.  And go half blind and have joint pain and nerve pain.  Those sugary snacks are a poor trade for your health.

 

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Fat.  Seriously.  It is what keeps you satiated and does NOT raise blood sugar.  I have been on a Low Carb, High Fat diet for 2-1/2 years.  I eat to my "meter".  I did a lot of testing the first month to see which foods raise my blood glucose levels (no surprise, everyone is different).  Buy a cheap meter and strips at Walmart and test it yourself.  

I eat protein in normal amounts (too much and the blood can convert it to glucose), veggies, nuts, dairy, and some fruit.  I do cheat on this diet, but NEVER on the gluten-free diet.  My blood sugar has been close to normal ever since.  

Butter melted on my veggies.  Heavy cream.  Avocados, olive oil, meat drippings, bacon.    Yum!  

Finally, the American Diabetic Association is recommending this diet for some people.  Why not for all?  They thinks it is too hard to maintain it (they should try maintaining a gluten-free diet!) and to be honest, there is not a one size fits all for diabetics just like celiac disease (we all have our various tolerances beside the need to be gluten-free).   My GP disapproved at first.  Now, he says to keep doing what I am doing.  My cholesterol levels are terrific!  (Normal compared to being super low before I was diagnosed).  

I started this LCHF diet because I know that I want to avoid medications for diabetes (insulin excluded).    My gut just can not take it.  

I have been weaning my family off all the excess sugar that is so prominent in the Standard American..British..you name it .... diet.  I felt best when I went on this diet after being gluten-free for a year.  

So, do your research.  Do what is best for you -- not for the herd!  

 

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Thank you both so much for your replies.  I like the sound of what's on the menu, cyclinglady!

I think I have definitely been straying down the cake aisle too often so will look out for more protein, GFinDC.  Readjusting to fewer carbs is making me feel a bit weird - and from what I read this might be causing the thirst which thankfully is much better today.

It is good to know there is a lot I can do about this.

My doctor will be doing a cholesterol test too so I may be coming back for more advice!

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There are dozens of paleo sites you can check out for recipes and ideas. You may also want to take a look at the GI:

http://www.the-gi-diet.org/

It's based on foods which take longer to digest and don't spike your blood sugar and set off a vicious circle of sugar, insulin and fat. 

If you get it right your grazing drops dramatically. You stay full for longer and sugar cravings go down. :)

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Thanks!  When I get a mo. I shall do some reading.  Anything to get rid of these highs and lows.  I must say a friend of mine who has done paleo is positively glowing now.

 

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Hi Cristiana,

Good for you to get it checked out!  That was smart.

2 paleo websites that I like and have cooked from are ElanasPantry and AgainstAll Grain.  Both have some yummy recipes.  Just made one for dinner last night.  I won't add any other info as it sounds like you've got lots to read already!  I hope you get something figured out that helps!  My sweet tooth is also dreadful.

Hugs

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I hope you do well on your new diet cristiana, whatever it turns out to be.  Another site with lots of paleo diet info is Marks Daily Apple.  He also lists cooking oils that are good for you vs bad for you to eat.  Try searching his site for topics of interest.  I am not too interested in the paleo diet backstory as such.  But it seems like a good diet for many people to try at least.

The diabetes forum has good info also, from people with diabetes vs doctors.  They used to have a chat for people to ask questions, but I don't know i that is still active.  From memory, some of the people there limited themselves to 1 cracker a day's worth of carbs.  And they were off their medication completely.   Mostly against doctors advice about diet, but some doctors give bad advice about diabetes to people.  Like telling people they have to eat carbs to be healthy, which is not true.

http://www.diabetesforum.com/forum.php

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Thanks so much, gluten-free,  in my hypchondriacal panic I saw that website!  It is good to have an endorsement from a celiac.   I remember seeing quite a few reassuring stories in it along the lines that you describe.

Funny isn't as because I now feel far less inclined to eat large amounts of carbohydrate now I have cut back a bit.   It seems the more sugar I ate, the more I wanted to eat.  

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18 hours ago, GFinDC said:

I hope you do well on your new diet cristiana, whatever it turns out to be.  Another site with lots of paleo diet info is Marks Daily Apple.  He also lists cooking oils that are good for you vs bad for you to eat.  Try searching his site for topics of interest.  I am not too interested in the paleo diet backstory as such.  But it seems like a good diet for many people to try at least.

The diabetes forum has good info also, from people with diabetes vs doctors.  They used to have a chat for people to ask questions, but I don't know i that is still active.  From memory, some of the people there limited themselves to 1 cracker a day's worth of carbs.  And they were off their medication completely.   Mostly against doctors advice about diet, but some doctors give bad advice about diabetes to people.  Like telling people they have to eat carbs to be healthy, which is not true.

http://www.diabetesforum.com/forum.php

Hey, I am a member of that forum (not very active though).  But that's exactly how I eat.  They base their diet on this site:

http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/

A year after my celiac disease diagnosis, my GP tells me that I am prediabetic via an email.  Instructs me to improve my diet and exercise more.  What?  I exercise more that most my age.  I run, swim, bike and teach a few exercise classes.  Change my diet?  I am gluten free.  I can not give up my gluten-free goodies!  It was asking for too much.  But I did know about celiac disease and the connection to Type 1 diabetes and Type 2 runs in my family.  So I found Jenny's site.  It made sense and I continued to research more.  Bought a Walmart meter, started testing my foods and found that "snap" I had huge spikes!  Kept meticulous data for a month and went back to my doctor.  He agreed.  I am insulin resistant and the writing's on the wall.  How to stop or slow the progression?  A low carb high fat diet.  Within three days, my blood sugar readings were normal.  Keep tracking and went back to my doctor who was amazed.  He told me to keep doing what I had been doing -- and it's been 2-1/2 years!

Here's a recent study from the University of Alabama:

https://www.uab.edu/news/innovation/item/4997-low-carb-diet-recommended-for-diabetics

Sometimes you just have to take things into your own hands.  If I had just cut down on sugar, I 'd be on drugs and insulin and struggling to keep my feet from being amputated.  That's an exaggeration (not really), but really who cares if my foot gets chopped off?  My doctor?  He's nice, but pretty busy.  No, it's all on me!  

Guess what?  I am happy on my diet.  I was addicted to sugar.  What's the biggest thing to change in our diet over the last 100 years?  Sugar.  It's in everything!  California just released a study stating over 50% of all Californians are prediabetic or have diabetes and most don't even know they have it (hummm....sounds like celiac disease).  

http://newsroom.ucla.edu/releases/majority-of-california-adults-have-prediabetes-or-diabetes

Enough of my soapbox talk......I've got to get some stuff done!

 

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I'd love to go low carb and higher fat, the problem is that my triglycerides are too high, LDL too high and so want to go vegan, I am on a low carb type diet at the moment but high cholesterol/Triglyceride markers AND high Glucose markers too!!! Stopped all those Gluten free cakes and products, too high in sugar and bad carbs I think

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cristina,

Eat to your meter is great advice from cyclinglady.

I have controlled my prediabetes for 5 years that way.  It has not been over 6.5 A1c in over 5 years and most times it is in the low 6's or or even under (5.9 is considered normal).

Before then it was over 8.5 at one point and the doctor's just wanted to give me more medicine.

Now I am one of his success stories. 

What helped more than anything was to take Chromium Poly.  It helps insulin work better by a factor of 100x.

Doctor's always treat the symptom's (at least at first and not the cause.

My a1c came down in two months over 2 whole points and has never been more than prediabetic since.

Do these three or four things and I can almost promise you will notice a difference in 6 months time.

1) I found if I wasn't absorbing my foods/nutrients/vitamins/minerals then they were not doing me any good.

Take Niacinamide 3/day for 3 to 4 months then you will be burping regulary and your stool will sink where now it probably floats.

2) take supplement with your missing nutrients.

The things that helped me greatly taking

a) Magnesium Citrate 200mg 3/day for energy, cramps, fatigue etc.

b )  vitamin D for my moods and mind it also is important for insulin.

c)  Manganese like Chromium can help your insulin

d) Vitamin K is prominent in fat and we eat low fat often limiting fat soluble vitamins.

Here a summary of the benefits of Vitamin K.

http://www.lifeextension.com/magazine/2014/9/The-Surprising-Longevity-Benefits-of-Vitamin-K/Page-01

After taking all of these supplements my blood sugar control improved by a step increase for each vitamin/mineral I took.

The doctor's are/were content to see me get gradually worse until my body was dependent on their drugs.

The attach rate for Metaformin is 90+ percent which means most people who begin it never get off of it.

I have been drug free for over 5+ years not needing medicine to control my prediabetes.

My doctor checks in on my once a year and brags about how good I am doing and all I have done is be modest in my food choices and supplemented with missing nutrients.

This will take about 6 months to complete.  Take the Magnesium Citrate or Glycinate right away.  I helps a lot of things. Then begin the Niacianmide 2 or 3/day at the same time and in 3 months begin taking each supplement Chromium, Vitamin D, Vitamin K etc in turn always using your glucose meter to tell you when your body is responding to the missing nutrient.

I would use a basic meal say potato chips etc over and over again every Friday for example as a treat.  Walking if necessary after the meal to lower my blood counts and then watch them drop after taking Chromium for a month.  The same with Vitamin K, and Manganese etc.

Vitamin K during that time lowered my Cholesterol so that I no longer need a statin.

If you are taking a statin consider stop taking it or talk your doctor about it.  Woman go on to develop diabetes while taking statin's at a 50 percent increased rate.

I became prediabetic while on statins and have not taking them since.

They can cause muscle soreness and even temporary memory loss.

good luck on your journey and I hope this is helpful.

*****  this is not medical advice only my experience and results from research.

going low carb will help.  Eating soluble fibers can help too think beans.

If I eat potato chips or other high carb meal and eat soluble fiber as my last side my blood counts are 40 or 50 points lower or more.  It makes a difference if you are struggling with your numbers.

again good luck.  I hope this helps you the way it did me.

posterboy,

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Thanks so much, posterboy.   My nutritionalist has also advised me to try to keep levels stable to stop neuropathy from getting worse.  It was good to read your advice.  Much appreciated.

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as far as my knowledge concern about  The best diabetes eating routine is one that is all around adjusted and incorporates an assortment of solid sugars, fats, and proteins. The secret to this exercise in careful control is picking the correct mix of sustenances that will help keep glucose level in your objective range and maintain a strategic distance from enormous swings that can bring about diabetes manifestations — from the continuous pee and thirst of high glucose to the weariness, dazedness, cerebral pains, and mind-set changes of low glucose . it will aslo best who want diet ...thank you 

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Hello Christina,

 

I know that this may be a year late, but I do feel compelled to let people who are proactive know the results of my last 40 years as a Type I Diabetic, and 7 years (knowing) that I have Celiac Disease.  If you, "do research" you will get mixed results, just like my blood glucose numbers when I went to Disney world, and ate all their sugary gluten-free foods.  What I would suggest is to get a book, like Corinne T Netzer's Carbohydrate counter, so you may understand what a large carbohydrate count looks like.  This is commonly known as, "High Glycemic Index."  Then, understand that research in the last year has proven that eating "good" (meaning less-refined, and without such high glycemic foods, like white potatoes) carbohydrates are not "bad" for you.  As a matter of fact, clinical trials on American women showed that [animal] fat, from the typical American diet increase insulin resistance.

https://foodandhealth.com/cpecourses/insulinresistance.pdf

I would recommend what some food and health organizations are saying about "good" (unrefined, fresh vegetable oils) are in terms of being up to 35% of a "balanced" diet (you won't be as hungry later).  Examples are: Avocadoes, coconut oil, flax and hemp seed oils (for Omega3 fatty acids), and less fruit (it has fruit sugar, to be eaten in small quantities).  I personally like Japanese foods, like Miso soup and use Kale, as it has all the iron, and vitamin C you probably need, without all the additional carbohydrates.

Weight my personal advice against the diets you are willing to try, in that you have to eat them, and at least pretend to like them, so that the changes you wish will begin to happen.

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