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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Oue teenage daughter is having issues accepting newly diagnosed Celiacs . Help
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7 posts in this topic

Our daughter is 14. She was diagnosed right before the holidays. As great as it was to finally find out why she's had all these health issue ( two years following a four month recovery from a concussion) it hasn't been easily accepted. She avoids bread because they just aren't like the old ones. She sneaks junk she knows is bad. She won't go on the website for support. I suggested talking to someone, nope. She actually had a therapist during and after her recovery from the concussion because she was suffering from depression. We realize now it might have been partially from the concession and partially from Celiacs. I think she really still feels if she heals it will all go away. How do I help her. It's been hard for me as well. I feel sad for her. Then angry when she's not taking care of her body and taking supliments to be healthy. When we go somewhere she doesn't want me to say anything. She hates feeling different. And we fight when she does eat foods then complains how bad she feels. 

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You might want to continue with a therapist.  Maybe even one that deals in chronic illness or eating disorders.

this will probably get better with time.  It may get better when she realizes there are others out there with this illness.

 

 

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What are her favorite foods? We can give good tasting gluten free equivalents.

For example:

Bagels - Canyon Bakehouse makes a fantastic tasting gluten free plain bagel

Cereal - Gorilla Munch cereal tastes great and reminds me of corn pops

Chocolate cake mix - Betty Crocker has a gluten free chocolate cake mix that tastes no different to me than regular. Make cupcakes, frost them and freeze them. Then she can have one whenever she likes.

If she eats granola bars Kind bar - almond and coconut tastes great

Hershey bar 1.55oz I believe is gluten free.

Pizza - if she likes frozen pizza Freschetta makes gluten free pizza

Cookies - Glutino and Kinnikinnik make good tasting gluten free cookies

Snacks - Lays original potato chips, Glutino pretzels, Tostitos scoops were all gluten free last I checked.

 

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 I experienced the same thing as your teenage daughter... or something very similar. I'm still trying to figure out the depression and anxiety, but it has gotten better since I've been off gluten. It is so hard to be different as a teenager, even as an adult! It might take a while but time will heal all. It also helps to take a trip to Costco, they have so many gluten-free foods that are yummy, and you don't have to look very hard for them.  Also, it's helped for me to have people around me recognize that having celiac disease kind of sucks. Instead of trying to say that  gluten doesn't taste all that good anyways, it helped to have people support me. There was a time when I was very angry though. I can say that in the year that I've been diagnosed, and gluten-free I feel so much better... and it's definitely worth it. 

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Welcome! 

My heart goes out to you!  I have a soon-to-be 16 year old.  She does not have celiac disease, but I can relate to your daughter wanting to fit in and not calling attention to herself.  My daughter is in marching band and there is a 16 year with celiac disease.  Luckily, I have been able to inform the parent boosters and the director about celiac disease.  We make sure this girl always has some gluten-free snacks available to her at events (football games).  She has also come to our home for gluten-free baking during the holidays.  The other kids know she must be gluten free and are pretty supportive (band kids are a tight-knit group).  Every high school kid needs a group!  

Look for a local celiac group.  Consider a gluten-free camp.  (I wanna go!)  just think how much fun it would be to not have to worry about what you eat!  KarenG lists a few locations in one of her postings.    There is one in Northern CA (I am Southern) and I am seriously thinking of asking the group for a family gluten-free weekend camp.  It sounds so appealing!   

A therapist might be a good idea too.  

Has anyone else in your family been tested?  Maybe consider going gluten-free for the entire household so at least she will not feel different at home (get gluten fixes outside of the house).  Keep plenty of her gluten-free treats on hand.  I would not worry about supplements unless your doctor has tested for deficiencies and advised her to take them.  Encourage healthy food choices by modeling.  Eventually, she will improve.  Lots of setbacks, but you just move forward.  

Make sure she always has safe food on hand (purse, backpack, locker).  That will prevent poor food choices and risk-taking.  

You as a mother are doing your best!  Continue to keep supporting her.  And....let me tell you that by 16, you just might start hearing, "Thanks, Mom" instead of all that eye-rolling!  It is amazing how much maturing takes place.  

 

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On 2/11/2017 at 11:35 AM, cyclinglady said:

Welcome! 

My heart goes out to you!  I have a soon-to-be 16 year old.  She does not have celiac disease, but I can relate to your daughter wanting to fit in and not calling attention to herself.  My daughter is in marching band and there is a 16 year with celiac disease.  Luckily, I have been able to inform the parent boosters and the director about celiac disease.  We make sure this girl always has some gluten-free snacks available to her at events (football games).  She has also come to our home for gluten-free baking during the holidays.  The other kids know she must be gluten free and are pretty supportive (band kids are a tight-knit group).  Every high school kid needs a group!  

Look for a local celiac group.  Consider a gluten-free camp.  (I wanna go!)  just think how much fun it would be to not have to worry about what you eat!  KarenG lists a few locations in one of her postings.    There is one in Northern CA (I am Southern) and I am seriously thinking of asking the group for a family gluten-free weekend camp.  It sounds so appealing!   

A therapist might be a good idea too.  

Has anyone else in your family been tested?  Maybe consider going gluten-free for the entire household so at least she will not feel different at home (get gluten fixes outside of the house).  Keep plenty of her gluten-free treats on hand.  I would not worry about supplements unless your doctor has tested for deficiencies and advised her to take them.  Encourage healthy food choices by modeling.  Eventually, she will improve.  Lots of setbacks, but you just move forward.  

Make sure she always has safe food on hand (purse, backpack, locker).  That will prevent poor food choices and risk-taking.  

You as a mother are doing your best!  Continue to keep supporting her.  And....let me tell you that by 16, you just might start hearing, "Thanks, Mom" instead of all that eye-rolling!  It is amazing how much maturing takes place.  

 

" i was amazed how much my father learned between the time I was 14 and 21..."  Mark Twain

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