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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

GliadinX
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Hi all,

I just ordered a bottle of GliadinX capsules, has anyone else tried them?  I am both excited at the thought of being able to order French fries etc. without concern of CC and terrified to try!

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We had a major discussion on this product a few weeks ago. It will not help you much if you have actual celiac. As it is a autoimmune disease, your body is reacting with antibodies to the gluten proteins. This starts before it even gets to the gut, as soon as you body detects teh gluten in the mouth and stomach it starts producing the antibodies that will attack your body. Now the GliadinX might help with the prolonged abdominal discomfort, but it will not stop the damage to your villi. DO NOT think of it as some miracle pill. You should still avoid gluten, hell your better off buying test kits to test your food eating out then the gliadin pills.

Do this at your own risk but please try not to confuse new comers with this product.  

YES i have a personal vendetta against such products using enzymes to make gluten "Safer" for celiacs  I fell for the same BS years ago.

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Posted (edited)

44 minutes ago, Ennis_TX said:

We had a major discussion on this product a few weeks ago. It will not help you much if you have actual celiac. As it is a autoimmune disease, your body is reacting with antibodies to the gluten proteins. This starts before it even gets to the gut, as soon as you body detects teh gluten in the mouth and stomach it starts producing the antibodies that will attack your body. Now the GliadinX might help with the prolonged abdominal discomfort, but it will not stop the damage to your villi. DO NOT think of it as some miracle pill. You should still avoid gluten, hell your better off buying test kits to test your food eating out then the gliadin pills.

Do this at your own risk but please try not to confuse new comers with this product.  

YES i have a personal vendetta against such products using enzymes to make gluten "Safer" for celiacs  I fell for the same BS years ago.

I agree that's this isn't a way To cheat and eat Gluten if you have Celiac.  These are supplements - not medication, so who knows what they do or don't do.  There are currently medicines in actual FDA medical trials that look like they may degrade gluten in the stomach, before it reaches   the small  Intestine.  

The gluten antibody reaction does not happen in your mouth, or your nose, or your stomach - it happens in the small intestine.  So, if we can destroy/ degrade/zap gluten in the short time it is in the stomach, that would be helpful.  

 

 

 

 

Edited by kareng
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6 minutes ago, kareng said:

The gluten antibody reaction does not happen in your mouth, or your nose, or your stomach - it happens in the small intestine.

Are you sure it does not start at least some kind of production in other areas? I can get sores in my mouth, lymph nodes normally have a reaction within 30mins of consuming something with a flour or breading. I also notice issues with the fog, anxiety etc. with inhaled flours sometimes if I go by the bakery some times at stores.  Now the gut issues and other issues take a hour or so after consuming before it gets real bad for me. Those are the truly evil ones that lay me out for hours, with vomiting, motion control issues, and D or C.

I can see the anxiety part perhaps being a psychological manifestation. But the rest are obviously some kind of triggered reaction to it. Perhaps it depends on ones sensitivity to gluten or mine for all I know might be a combination with a allergy to it. (Testing is out of date for my allergies by 4 years)

Sorry for any misinformation due to my incompetence in the matter and assumptions based on my personal reactions.

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2 hours ago, Ennis_TX said:

Are you sure it does not start at least some kind of production in other areas? I can get sores in my mouth, lymph nodes normally have a reaction within 30mins of consuming something with a flour or breading. I also notice issues with the fog, anxiety etc. with inhaled flours sometimes if I go by the bakery some times at stores.  Now the gut issues and other issues take a hour or so after consuming before it gets real bad for me. Those are the truly evil ones that lay me out for hours, with vomiting, motion control issues, and D or C.

I can see the anxiety part perhaps being a psychological manifestation. But the rest are obviously some kind of triggered reaction to it. Perhaps it depends on ones sensitivity to gluten or mine for all I know might be a combination with a allergy to it. (Testing is out of date for my allergies by 4 years)

Sorry for any misinformation due to my incompetence in the matter and assumptions based on my personal reactions.

I think,  if you could read  real Medical info about Celiac, it would say it's a reaction in the small intestine. When I went to the International Celiac symposium, the lectures about the drugs to break down gluten weren't to break it down on your plate! Lol  they were talking about keeping it from your small intestine.  

You may be having allergic reactions, maybe the gluten is passing thru your stomach quickly, maybe it's something else?  Our own experiences and assumptions about them do not make a " scientific fact".  I think you have recently found that you have some other medical diagnoses that may be coming into play?

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I agree with Ennis.  Digestion starts in the mouth. Enzymes in saliva get right to work breaking down gluten in the mouth.  Some of these enzymes are produced by the bacteria living in one's mouth.  

Here's a really cool article:   

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28087531

This article describes a study of the oral bacteria in people with Celiac Disease as compared to non-celiac people.  Celiacs have more bacteria that secrete gluten digesting enzymes.  

Here's a quote:

"While the pathophysiological link between the oral and gut microbiomes in celiac disease needs further exploration, the presented data suggest that oral microbe-derived enzyme activities are elevated in subjects with celiac disease, which may impact gluten processing and the presentation of immunogenic gluten epitopes to the immune system in the small intestine. IMPORTANCE Ingested gluten proteins are the triggers of intestinal inflammation in celiac disease (celiac disease). Certain immunogenic gluten domains are resistant to intestinal proteases but can be hydrolyzed by oral microbial enzymes. Very little is known about the endogenous proteolytic processing of gluten proteins in the oral cavity. Given that this occurs prior to gluten reaching the small intestine, such enzymes are likely to contribute to the composition of the gluten digest that ultimately reaches the small intestine and causes celiac disease. "

Wow!  Are the bacterial enzymes producing weird half digested gluten molecules that trigger celiac disease, or are they helping?  Can't wait for follow up studies on this subject!   So exciting in an "Amy Farrah Fowler/Sheldon Cooper" sorta way... but I digress...

Airborne flour bothers me, too.  The sinus passages, eyes, lungs, mouth and throat all can absorb airborne antigens directly from the environment into the bloodstream. Once there, the antibodies attack, just the same as if the antigen was eaten and absorbed into the bloodstream from the digestive tract. 

And, no, the GliadinX pills won't work.  

 

 

 

 

 

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10 hours ago, Ennis_TX said:

 This starts before it even gets to the gut, as soon as you body detects teh gluten in the mouth and stomach it starts producing the antibodies that will attack your body.

Celiac is an autoimmune disease not just a gut disorder.  If one doubts that they have only to look at folks with DH or Ataxia that don't (yet) have GI presentations. The antibodies start to be formed when gluten comes into contact with mucous membranes. There was research being done trying to find a way to diagnose us without having to do a gluten challenge. They used a swab either in the cheek or rectum (buccal and rectal challenge) and then biopsied the area a few hours later and were able to detect the antibodies. I don't have time to look for those research studies but they are there and were peer reviewed.  If I can find a copy of the paper I wrote in college about this I will post the references I used. I know one was the NIH but not sure of the others. Maybe some of you folks that enjoy and have time for the research might be able to find info on the studies. I might have even posted about this and provided links years ago.  At he time I thought it was great they were looking for ways that were less barbaric to diagnose folks that had already gone gluten free.

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On 3/18/2017 at 4:50 PM, Charli61 said:

Hi all,

I just ordered a bottle of GliadinX capsules, has anyone else tried them?  I am both excited at the thought of being able to order French fries etc. without concern of CC and terrified to try!

Charli61,

I think for most Celiac's we are afraid that it would do more harm than good.

See this thread by Jefferson Adams that asked the same question about Celiac "drugs" in the pipeline.

https://www.celiac.com/articles/24099/1/Why-All-the-Hate-for-Celiac-Disease-Drug-Treatments/Page1.html

Unless we can be 100% sure we are not doing damage to our Small Intestine it isn't worth the effort/risk for most Celiac's.

If you are a NCGS then knock yourself out.

If I was traveling and knew it might lessen might  a reaction from being "glutened" by the waiter then I might be glad to try it as a  fall back but not as a first line of dense and press my luck and end up hurting my GI tract again.

When full gut recovery can take up to two year's is it really worth the effort to cheat with french fries when you can go to Five Guys and get gluten free fries! instead.

see this link https://www.celiac.com/articles/24693/1/Full-Gut-Recovery-from-Celiac-Disease-Can-Take-Up-to-Two-Years/Page1.html

If we are lucky we have only messed up our insides for 6 months.

just my two cents worth.

posterboy,

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Hi, I only got them for the odd time I  want to eat out, maybe have french fries even without a dedicated fryer.  I live in a small city in BC Canada and there aren't a lot of choices.  I don't intend to take them and intentionally eat gluten.  I am far too sensitive for that.  I just thought that if I could take one or two and maybe just maybe not get CC on my gluten-free food it would be worth it. 

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On 3/18/2017 at 3:45 PM, Ennis_TX said:

We had a major discussion on this product a few weeks ago. It will not help you much if you have actual celiac. As it is a autoimmune disease, your body is reacting with antibodies to the gluten proteins. This starts before it even gets to the gut, as soon as you body detects teh gluten in the mouth and stomach it starts producing the antibodies that will attack your body. Now the GliadinX might help with the prolonged abdominal discomfort, but it will not stop the damage to your villi. DO NOT think of it as some miracle pill. You should still avoid gluten, hell your better off buying test kits to test your food eating out then the gliadin pills.

Do this at your own risk but please try not to confuse new comers with this product.  

YES i have a personal vendetta against such products using enzymes to make gluten "Safer" for celiacs  I fell for the same BS years ago.

Thank you, I wish I had asked BEFORE I spent $100 on the bottle.  I just thought for the odd time  I am out and the only choice is french fries and no dedicated fryer I would maybe cut down the risk of CC.

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