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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Front Page Of Wall Street Journal
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44 posts in this topic

Wow--yes--very cool! :)

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wow Deb--that's cool! how did he get connected with the article?

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great picture! you are FAMOUS! :)

I just printed it out for my archives!

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Deb, many thanks to your husband for participating in the WSJ celiac story. What a great opportunity to help spread celiac awareness.

Speaking of celiac in the media, in attempts to get more celiac coverage in the media to increase awareness keep in mind that one of the media's primary criteria for selecting topics is business based: how many customers would read, listen, view, etc. When there is an article such as this in a rather prestigious publication and it gets such high visibility (see my earlier post regarding how high it has rated in "Most Emailed" on WSJOnline) it can provide a good "attention getter" when you try to promote coverage in other media. (e.g. I have emailed the article to NPR's "Talk of the Nation Science Friday", one of my favorite radio programs, highlighting it's popularity at WSJ and suggested celiac as a Science Friday segment topic.) We need to keep up the momentum in spreading celiac awareness.

George

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Deb -- Sorry about hubby. Many thanx! And God bless you.

You both have helped change and bring about awareness for celiac's, people and doctors.

We need to keep up the momentum in spreading celiac awareness.

I agree!

Any ideas?

Don't laugh. Call me silly.

I think I'm going to send the article in my Xmas cards this year.

So people will get 'it'?!

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Folks: I'm the author of the WSJ article. I just wanted to thank everyone who has written or posted about the story, and to apologize in advance if I'm not able to send personal replies to everyone who's written in. The response has been overwhelming; I've received something close to 150 e-mails since Friday, nearly all of them from celiacs or their family members. I've shared excerpts from a few messages with my editors in NY on a not-for-publication basis, just so they know what kind of effect the story has had.

I also wanted to thank several posters to these boards who replied to my inquiry and were kind enough to spend some time telling me their personal stories. We weren't able to include everyone in the story, unfortunately, nor to give each individual's story the time and attention it deserved, but we did our best given the natural constraints of newspaper publishing. I do hope to do some followup stories, and with luck I'll be able to include some of the material that didn't make the page-one story and to address some of the many suggestions I've received from readers.

I treat e-mail as personal correspondence, so we won't publish any of the notes I've received directly. If anyone would like to submit a letter for possible publication, please direct it to wsj.ltrs@wsj.com.

Many thanks again, and best of luck to all of you.

Best, David Hamilton

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Mr. Hamilton:

Thank you for taking the time to come to our forum to communicate with us directly to let us know the overwhelming response you have had to your article. We really appreciate what you have done to raise awareness for this disease (as I mentioned in my e-mail to you today), and wanted to reiterate to you just how wonderfully informative your article was. Instead of just doing the "technical, scientific" aspect of this disease, you captured the human aspect of this disease. You truly have a gift.

Kudos to you!

Many thanks,

Karen

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David-

Again--Thanks so much for your interest in Celiac. Articles like yours share responsibility for the raising of awareness, which leads to more individuals being diagnosed. Thank you! -Jen

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Hi All :) My husband is "Mr. Martin" and I am sure the WSJ editors in NYC cut some addtional info about him out as his interview with the author was about 40 minutes long. As many of you know, Mike has been plagued with other health problems over the years that stem from his misdiagnosed celiac.

We were very excited to be included in this story and we were caught off guard that it was finally published on 12/9 (the interview happened over a month ago). The photo is from our 2004 25th Wedding Anniversary. Deb :D

Thanks, Deb!

We're ALL appreciative of your, and Mike's, efforts - as well as everyone else that was involved in bringing this story in the Journal (as those of us here call it on the "Street", lol) to fruition.

I know that you've written about Mike's "other" celiac-related problems, but would you mind giving us another short rundown of them?

Bill

Edited by celiachap
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I'm one of the people that David interviewed while he was working on his article. That was in early October. He has done a great job in telling our story, and it is just fantastic that it was a page-one story.

Thank you so much, David. It is a terrific article.

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I was interviewd, too - and am also pleased with the resulting article.

Kudos, David.

Gina

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The article said celiac disease can lead to Type 1 diabetes....that's wrong, isn't it....shouldn't it be Type 2 diabetes??

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Type 1 diabetes is correct. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease wherein antibodies are produced which attack the Islets of Langerhans in the pancreas leaving the body unable to produce insulin. The proportion of celiacs among type 1 diabetics is higher that the population as a whole, and the reverse is also true. Recent research is now suggesting that untreated celiac can trigger other autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes.

I was finally diagnosed with celiac at age 46. I developed type 1 diabetes at age 31, but had been having celiac symptoms for years before that. Perhaps if the celiac had been recognized when I was in my twenties, and I had gone gluten free then, maybe I would not have developed the type 1 diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes is not an autoimmune disease. The Islets are still there, but they may produce insufficient insulin, or the other cells may resist it. The result in both cases is high blood sugar, which causes all of the complications associated with diabetes.

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Peter--Thanks for that explanation. I had read many times about the link, but never really understood the "how's and why's".

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Where can I get a copy of this article? I would love to read it. Thank you

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Where can I get a copy of this article? I would love to read it. Thank you

The article is posted on the 1st page of this thread. :)

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Update -- I brought the WSJ article with me and asked my new GASTRO DOC (treats celiac disease) if he had read it. He said NO I DON'T READ THE WSJ. So, I gave him a print out.

I just got off the phone with my cousin that works as an art director in NYC in advertising for the medical industry (RX companies)... She said DOCs don't read the WSJ (unless they have a business brain), but the EXECUTIVES from all the RX companies DO. She said when they read it and see there is a huge need to find the magic pill and all the $$$$$ in it for them to cure us, it will get their attention.

Just a thought...

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I think I'm going to send the article in my Xmas cards this year.

So people will get 'it'?!

This is a really neat idea. Maybe I'm silly, too :lol: .

But, oh, wow, this was an awesome article. Thanks so much, George and David, this is so cool. I will print this out and copy it for everyone I know...

Hugs, Stef

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I am so happy that this made the front page! I haven't been able to look at the second article if anyone can share it...

I was interviewed as well - he did a great job on the story. My mom has diabetes type 1, and my doctor thinks I got celiac from her because of the autoimmune relation, even though she does not have celiac. I am a little nervous that I may develop DT1 because of that - she did not start to see pancreas trouble until she got pregnant, and I have not had kids yet. You never know what will happen when your immune system is overactive!

And I hope Mr. Hamilton will forgive me, but I thought it was interesting that he himself had been diagnosed with celiac and therfore has been through what we have with the diet. However, he was found not have it later when he had a biospy and went back on gluten without problems. So he has been there and back!

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