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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes

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Hello everyone. 

 

Ive been diagnosed with celiac for about 4 years now. It's been a rough road but I feel like I've gotten as good as I can get with eliminating gluten completely from my diet. 

 

I am an undergraduate student with a driven passion to become a nurse (I'm a guy, I know). I love the field and can't wait to help people every day.

 

As some of you may know, the nursing curriculum is extremely intense. I have an very strict routine and schedule where I can handle the rigor of my classes, work, and fitness (I am really into health and fitness, it's the best release from the stresses induced from school. I get 6 hours of sleep on the dot and manage to work, volunteer, study, and eat decently well. I love my life when it's on this routine and am so happy and social with people around me. I'm making progress, I'm moving forward, making something of my life. 

 

But lately I've been suffering. I've been getting sick a lot more often from what seems to be random uncontrollable cross contamination from various things. When I get sick, my routine gets all messed up, I fall off my schedule, and things start going downhill. I like to call it the "celiac rut" I get stuck in. When I'm sick I can't work out, without working out I get extremely stressed and can't sleep. Without sleep I can't focus on my school and you know, the slippery slope that pretty much leads to lots of depression and anxiety. 

 

This. Absolutely. Sucks. I fall behind in school and have trouble focusing on my priorities because I need more sleep to heal, and I can't go to class or the gym when I'm throwing up or spending hours on the toilet. Plus the mental symptoms turn me into an angry antisocial gluten monster. So that's always fun.

 

I really don't know how to manage this. I feel like at this rate I won't be able to keep up with my daily life. I physically can not handle the lifestyle I have when I get sick, and it piles up because when I get better I'm like weeks behind in material in my classes. 

 

I am am normally a super happy outgoing guy, I love being the person I truly am. But gluten is singlehandedly tearing my life apart and the depression is starting to take it's toll. 

 

I honestly dont know what to get out of posting this. I just hope that someone has some sort of trick or secret to get through this awful "celiac rut."

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So sorry you are going through this set back. You say you are getting glutened from random uncontrollable cross contamination.  What are the things that you think you are getting CC from? Are you consuming oats? If so you may want to drop those for a bit. Are you drinking distilled gluten grain alcohols (safe for most but some of us will react) or some of the gluten removed beers? Some of us are sensitive to those. Do you have a significant other who is a gluten eater? If you are then do be aware they need to brush teeth before you can kiss.

If you can tell us a bit more about what you think is getting you and what you are eating on a regular basis we may be able to help you find ways to avoid CC.

Have you had a repeat blood panel to see if your antibodies are down? If not it would be a good idea.

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Keep a food diary and record everything you eat, condiments, how it is fixed etc. You might have a CC cuplrit and find it this way. Also with this disease it is common to develop random intolerance issues and allergies to foods. If you get glutened depending on your symptoms you can do some things to get over them faster. They make a enzyme to break down gluten, will not stop the antibodies and not cure bit it helps with some of the gut issues to pass faster.  Teas, bone broth, plenty of liquids, and easy to digest foods, everyone is different on what these might be (for me nut flour/butter porridge as I have carb/grain issues). Pepto bismal, for most issues, Imodium for D, Magnesium Calm for C.

You might want to help your supplements a bit, as during a glutening your going ot have more issues with absorption. Doctors Best and or Natural vitality Calm magnesium. Calm is a citrate and can be a bit rough on your gut so you have to start off at 1/4 tsp and slowly up the dose. Under times of stress your magnesium levels can really drop so this works wonders. Look up Liquid Health Stress & Energy and Neurological Support try 1tbsp each 3 times a day....that and hte magnesium will really work wonders with making the old happy guy you normally are. Under extreme issues I also turn to CBD oil and eat plenty of hemp and pumpkin seeds from GERBS allergen Friendly foods.

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I'm sorry you're feeling poorly. As I read the good advice you already got and your message, I was wondering a couple of things.

1. You mention your very strict schedule that keeps you on track but it says eating decently well but it doesn't say cooking. If you are eating out a lot, that is clearly a place where you could be getting cross contaminated.

2. Do you have a roommate?  Maybe he/she is not aware of some of your issues (cooking with flour in the house etc)

3. How do you live on only 6 hours of sleep per night?  Maybe for a couple of nights that's enough, but generally speaking people need more sleep than that. Maybe long term sleep deprivation is playing into some of your illness?

Good luck!

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All good advice.  When was the last time you had your antibodies checked (Raven's sensible advice).   Maybe gluten is not really the culprit (but I suspect that it is).  

Ennis has great advice about keeping a journal.  

Texas Jen is right about the number of hours you are sleeping.  You probably need seven or eight hours.  As a nursing student, you probably already know this (studies support this).  You might think you are functioning well, but maybe you are not. We have had a few late nights with my 4-AP--classes-this-year high school student.  A lack of sleep causes a lot of errors.  A lesson my kid is learning first hand (as her Dad and I bite our tongues).  

I get the need to exercise, but if push comes to shove, sleep trumps exercise.  A lack of sleep can contribute to your anxiety and the gluten-monster behavior.   Besides, you need time to rebuild damage you can cause from a strenuous workout.  Don't stop, but I have learned to back off on "off" days.  Listen to your body.  You need sleep time as well to absorb/process all that you have learned that day too.  

Take care!  We need good nurses.  

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If I get cc -insomnia will manifest as one of the symptoms and knock me off sleep schedule. I also get fatigue. I have multiple symptoms.

If diet and personal care under control , environmental or new exposure event?

Are solely In school/classes or are you on rotation or observation in field? Are you handling or dispensing  any meds for patients that have gluten in it?. Even if gloved are you sensitive to airborne "dust " pharmaceutical med or Otc meds with gluten filler even when pouring can possibly effect you in my opinion. Maybe gloves/mask would help.

Just a thought.

Good luck.

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I'm only a year into this and was doing some research when I saw your post was at the bottom of the page. I've never posted here, but I felt compelled to reply. 

I feel what you are going through. I so get that. I'm so sorry you are stuck in your celiac rut. I understand the starting to fall into a depression. This does absolutely suck. Hugs to you and encouragement. You are not alone. 

College is hard enough to handle without the additional pressures of a chronic illness. You are studying nursing. This tells me you are a giver, and you likely put yourself last. Your body is telling you it's time to make it about you again. 

If you haven't already, please, let your professors know what is going on with your health. They should be able to give you some accommodations for when you have these fallouts to reduce some of the stress. 

For the time being, tighten up your diet. Go back to the simplest and cleanest whole foods until you can do a serious search of where the contamination is coming from, but try to get the healthiest foods in you. I know that is hard in college. If you don't eat a lot of grains, make sure you are getting vitamin Bs through supplements. I was not aware that I was B2 deficient, and that messed up my mind and my sleep. If you still struggle with your diet making you sick, try the AIP diet, Autoimmune Protocol diet. That made a huge difference for me. 

Mental health is an important as the physical. Even if you can't get your workout (my body needs a workout, too), go for a walk outside (if you are able) to get some sun and time with nature until you can. Study outside. Read outside. Just get outside. It might not seem like much, but I believe that saved me. When I was so depleted, just walking in the sun with music in my ears helped me start to get my mind turned around. It was the beginning of the change I needed to get it out of its depression. Walking turned into jogging, and now it's interval training and back to boot camp exercise.

I'm sorry this is what you are going through. Courage to you! You are going to make an exceptional nurse because you go through these things. Your understanding and compassion will be far superior than others who have not lived this life. Remember you are never alone with this. That helps me at times when nothing else does. Love to you, and keep posting your progress if you have time.

 

 

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Hey guys,

 

I appreciate the input, you are all very sweet and kind.

 

I do not eat out at all. Only eat food I cook. No alcohol. Only certified gluten-free oats, grains, rice, etc. I have 3 roommates in a little house. I have my own gluten-free section to cook and prepare food but it only does so much. They eat tons of bread and drink lots of beer so it's everywhere. I find myself washing my hands every 30 seconds just to lower my risk. I bite my nails, which I know doesn't help. 

 

And I will look into those magnesium and calming products, those sound nice.

 

i think yea, the biggest thing I'm looking for here is a way to minimize these symptoms that throw me off. I'm feeling a bit better today, but still extremely sluggish, with a crippling stomach ache. 

I guess I'll aim for 7 hours of sleep. That makes sense, I think I need to prioritize that.

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1 hour ago, Celiac4762 said:

 

 Only certified gluten-free oats, grains, rice, etc.

 

 

 

 

Try dropping the oats for while and see if that helps. Some of us, myself included, react to even the ones that are certified as gluten free.

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If you are super sensitive (or have become super sensitive) there is an oats purity protocol used by just a few companies. The fields do not grow gluten containing grains for 4-5 years before the oats are planted, the fields are walked several times a season for any plants not belonging to be pulled by hand, and all the equipment and facilities used to harvest are dedicated equipment. It's a bit pricey, but it produces the only oats that I don't react to (although I have not tried all certified gluten free oats). 

There are a couple variations of magnesium. Some cause loose stools so check the source of magnesium (and make sure it's gluten-free). Calm I've used with no problem. If you are stressed, you will burn through magnesium faster. 

Roommates create some complications. I had a shared kitchen for a vacation this past year, and I was constantly cleaning. I'm so used to my gluten-free kitchen I became very aware of sinks being used to pour pasta water in, bread crumbs left from a cut sandwich, and how much gluten a simple sponge can be exposed to. I kept my sponge to clean my area in a ziplock bag next to the sink. And if I was cleaning fruit or veggies, I filled a large bowl with water to use so I wouldn't have to always be cleaning the sink. If you have wooden utensils, make sure they aren't be accidentally used. A friend was getting cross-contaminated from shared condiments. 

My celiac reactions for cross contamination are not gastro but neurological so I can't offer much with that. A proper glutening is the only thing that gives me gastro symptoms, and it is the most painful experience! In either case, I drink lots of water. I will drink a gallon on those days. Throw some Calm in there, but force fluids. I also use Ultima Replinisher (which I typically use after exercise) if I'm forcing fluids, and I drink mugs of warm broth if my gut is really not doing well. 

Hang in there, C. Hope you feel better soon. 

 

 

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You've had great suggestions from everyone! Okay, some random thoughts from me. 3 roommates.....wow!.....almost a guarantee of something going wrong daily.

They can't be using loose gluten flour, not to make cakes or gravy or anything. Flour hangs in the air for hours to days. What you breathe goes down your throat & it's hello tummy after that.

I'm imagining kitchen cabinet knobs & drawer pulls & fridge handles loaded with gluten. Have your own exclusive cabinet in the kitchen? Your stuff on the top shelf of the freezer & top shelf of the fridge so gluten bits don't rain down on your stuff.

Can you have a sit down talk with your roomies & express what's going on. Think of it as a refresher course for them. Don't accuse, but handle the subject gently & just remind them of the rules & ask them to please be cognizant.

Faucet handles/knobs. This is something that has long been a pet peeve of mine, long before celiac entered the picture. Picture this.... dirty hands touch faucet handles to turn them on, one washes their hands and then takes those clean hands & touches that dirty faucet to turn the water off. How in the world does that make sense? So I'm going to say wash faucet handles before you touch them or use something like a paper towel to turn them off.

How about your toothbrush/toothpaste? Store yours in a separate place so no one mistakenly uses yours.

How about pots & pans? Do you wash them before using them? Some people only cursorily wash things & there could be gluten lurking in them so it wouldn't hurt to wash pans well prior to your using them.

Parchment paper is your best friend! Spread it on the countertops & prep your food on the parchment paper. Also either use parchment paper in a toaster oven for your toast or use toaster bags in toaster oven or toaster.

Microwave. Always cover what you put in it or else clean it every time prior to using it. Ever looked at the ceiling in a microwave? Stuff splatters & can end up falling into your food while it's in the nuker.

Edited by squirmingitch
I forgot to mention the microwave
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A few more thoughts.

I also join others in saying ditch anything with oats for at least a while, even if they are certified. For hot breakfasts, have quinoa or buckwheat instead. 

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Hi,

I feel your pain. Sorry you've been going through it. Interestingly, my sensitivity went up when I was massively sleep deprived looking after my baby. Anything that stresses your body, stresses your immune system.

Good work with the handwashing by the way - definitely a winner when sharing a kitchen with gluten-eaters.

Lots of good suggestions from people. I would also like to say that for me, I needed to not share an oven with people who ate gluten. Loose flour in the kitchen is a no. I know some people have recommended vitamins. I'm going to be controversial though and say that my recovery included (I can't say it was the cause of my recovery though...) stopping taking vitamins - the bulking agents are all starches and I couldn't handle them. I was reacting to oats and buckwheat and felt 100% better when I went grain-free.

A simple diet (nothing processed, no gluten free breads etc, with everything cooked from scratch, essentially Paleo or Specific Carbohydrate Diet - that was what sorted me out. It was hard initially (especially being a busy person like you with little time to cook) but my energy levels are amazing now so it really has given me time and it's quality of time too. I found my sensitivity to gluten came down a little once I made the changes.

Good luck!

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Hello, 

I certainly feel your pain. I have several immune conditions. it is whole body approach that is working better for me. I have chased diets, supplements, doctors, to no avail. You have to do many little things to get close to a balance in your body.

I started with a ketogenic diet, it eliminates all sugar an all starches, cross-contamination in manufacturing is rampant and hard to spot, So far i am no longer a diabetic and lost 55 lbs in less than 6 months. My brain is coming back to normal, i am loosing my fatty liver, my skin has cleared, sleep apnea is gone. etc.However the root problem is really in your gut and healing and balancing is is a delicate and lengthy proposition, DR tom o'Brian "TheDr.com explains it really well, check "The gluten Summit" for information from 29 of the most advanced and renown researchers on immunology, epigenetics, and the source of the 3 most common causes of  dead in the planet as well as the only protocol for healing the gut, with what you eat, how you should really eat, and tips and explanations for it by Dr Natasha Campbell McBryde. at "Gapsme.com", and her book, all fantastic to say the least and based in real sience with natural supplements and food!!

Investigate, dont just believe! You have to have an understanding in order to make a good decision.

Also faim.org  for list a of sources and dr's.

Wish you well in your quest, this will probably change medicine as we know it, and i vote for it!

AnaM

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While I agree that getting more sleep when ill or stressed is a must, many people can easily get by on 6 hours of sleep a night.  Not everyone needs 8 hours of sleep.  Sleep needs, like the gluten-free diet, is different for everyone. 

Nursing school can be very tough so it may be hard to get 8 hours every night.  I think the most important thing is to make sure no gluten is getting into your diet at all so you feel well and can manage your schedule better.  Good luck to you!

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I pretty much do all of that with the exception of parchment paper. I tried telling them about the loose flower and they look at me like I'm being some controlling a**hole. I'm too poor to afford extra paper towels and parchment paper. I can't seem to get them to understand how serious it is. I don't want to ruin everyone's day because of my disease. I can't use the ice machine because they put their hands in it, and when I tell them to be careful they forget. They've used my pans and silverware so I just end up giving them my pans and buying new ones. I am just going to accept that the next x-amount of years are just going to suck and there's nothing I can do. I just feel like I am being treated unfairly by the world. I  steal from grocery stores because I feel like they're robbing me with extremely expensive prices on food that I can eat. I have no shame whatsoever taking things when I can.

 It sucks and there's just about nothing I can do. I am going to accept it, work hard in school and finally have my own gluten free household. 

Im starting to get sick of free food being everywhere, and I can't have anything. My work always buys everyone lunch or dinner. And I can never eat anything because there's no safe local restaurants. I don't care about eating the food, I have no desire to eat gluten food at all, I just feel like everyone around me gets paid extra (in food because we're poor college students) and I'm left out, starving, eating canned tuna and canned beans. Can I at least get a raise since I can't eat the food?? And don't get me started on the socials. Last time, my work had Olive Garden, and everyone was running around with breadsticks trying to shake my hand. Probably washed my hands about a hundred times and still got sick that night.

 

PS I just kissed a girl the other night who definitely drank a beer so I'm dying from that as of now. (She lied about drinking beer). I know, I'm a mess. 

 

So like I said you are all very kind and helpful, I will take your advice and do my best to minimize my ingestion of gluten (I feel like I'm starting to become neurotic because of it). And I will continue to accept the suck, with the dream of one day being completely isolated from everyone where I can live in gluten free peace. I'm just physically not meant to be a normal human being.  

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A ketogenic diet is good if you are trying to lose weight, lower insulin levels, fight diabetes, lower blood sugar, etc. . But I'm 20 years old, 5'9 165lbs, that's not healthy for me. I am extremely active and need carbohydrates. In fact I definitely need more because I am lower than 12% body fat for sure. Also, if I remember, ketoacidocis is practically what the ketogenic diet induces, which isn't a normal body function. it's practically tricking your body to think it's starving, which for some, is a good thing. Not for all. It's like taking cold showers, they're good because they can boost and improve muscle recovery, but it does so by putting stress on your nervous system. Our bodies can handle being put into shock, they can bring out helpful chemicals in our bodies, yet they're not necessarily healthy. Yet, if you truly believe this is improving the way you live then who am I to tell you it's wrong. 

 

 

And yes, I am still playing the game of trying to find the golden number of hours on sleep. I read about sleep cycles and I'm going to try to make it either 6 or 7.5 on the dot. 

 

Nightsky,

what carbs would I eat? Am I allowed any type of rice if I'm grain free? I eat lots of potatoes but sometimes I feel it's too much. I cook all the time and eat about 90% whole foods  with the exception of peanut butter and ground beef. 

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4 hours ago, Celiac4762 said:

I  steal from grocery stores because I feel like they're robbing me with extremely expensive prices on food that I can eat. I have no shame whatsoever taking things when I can.

Yeah been there, done that, I have broken down to learning to how to cook acorns even, fall I steal pumpkins from the city decorations after halloween so I can eat the seeds and sell the meat in baked goods at the markets. I sometimes used to take produce from the grocery stores. Note you can sometimes talk with a manager and haggle on damaged produce they would toss.  I do not do steal them anymore, my family now offers to support me more now days, and the farmers market and bakery sales keep it where I can just afford food.

 

 

4 hours ago, Celiac4762 said:

what carbs would I eat? Am I allowed any type of rice if I'm grain free? I eat lots of potatoes but sometimes I feel it's too much. I cook all the time and eat about 90% whole foods  with the exception of peanut butter and ground beef. 

 It is  risky state, you have to MAKE sure you eating plenty of fat and protein. Otherwise your body eats itself, as the next best source for fats and protein is the stuff stored on your body as the fat and muscles your have. I live this way myself bit more mild since I can not eat meats. But I eat plenty of egg whites, nuts, seeds, and leafy greens. I literally eat every 4-5 hours at least a protein shake to prevent my body from turning on itself. You can actually body build in ketososis. You just need to really load on the fats and protein, it makes for a LEAN and slow building process....not as easy as carb bulking but my only choice due to my ulcerative colitis having carb, and sugar triggers.

 

 

4 hours ago, Celiac4762 said:

PS I just kissed a girl the other night who definitely drank a beer so I'm dying from that as of now. (She lied about drinking beer). I know, I'm a mess. 

I am allergic to corn and break out in a rash from it....my mother is hispanic and well you see where that goes, I recall about a year ago she hugged and kissed me on the cheek....well she had eaten something with corn or drank a soda cause I ended up with a red rash in a lip imprint on my cheek -_- bit amusing story for you.

 

I did a post earlier about where to bulk buy foil sheets, and freezer paper online from my supplier for my bakery I will update this later today with links for you. Buy in industrial rolls and they last you 4-6months
https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/118842-freezer-paper-for-safe-prep-surface/

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3 hours ago, Celiac4762 said:

 I  steal from grocery stores because I feel like they're robbing me with extremely expensive prices on food that I can eat. I have no shame whatsoever taking things when I can.

 

 

 

 

 

I have said since diagnosis that there are two places that I never want to be in for fear I would die from what they would feed me. One is a hospital and the other is jail. Fresh or frozen fruits, veggies, fresh meats, eggs, cheeses etc are also the same proce for us as for anyone who isn't celiac. The specialty gluten free baked goods and convience foods are more expensive but we should be eating minimal amounts of those to begin with anyway. I also have a very limited income so I go with eggs in many forms and Thai Kitchen rice noodles with various veggies and canned beans like Garbanzo (Chichi) for protein.

Some schools have food banks for students. Check and see if your school has one. There may not be a lot you can eat there but there will be something. Most cities have a food bank or Catholic Charities (you don't have to be Catholic to use their services) that can help.  My local one is good about letting me know when they have safe foods. They also get a lot of fresh produce this time of year. Have you checked into getting food stamps? You can just sign up for those but not the other services and the process is easier if you are not applying for cash help.

You mention having your roommates using your pans and silverware and then having to buy new. A good cleaning on the silverware is enough to remove any gluten residues and if the pans are in good condition they will be fine after washing also. You might want to keep your food preperation items in a bin in your room and just wash and put them away after use then you will know only you are using your plates, pans, etc.

I realize how important your education is and the need to finish but have you considered  temporarily suspending your studies until your health has improved? I had to do that with only 3 credit hours left in my degree programs. My grades were suffering and it was important to me to keep my high GPA. Talk to your advisor and see if this might be something you can arrange.  If you are in student housing with your roommates also talk to your advisor about the possibility of a move to better quarters. One of my children was put in senior housing as a freshmen to accomodate her need for her own cooking space. Wouldn't hurt to ask.

I hope things improve for you soon. Everything about dealing with celiac can be overwhelming for a bit but hopefully things will improve for you soon.

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I’m so sorry you feel you must steal, that must be awful. The only thing I might consider is that it can become a habit, especially the self-justification part.

Not that I'm recommending it right now for you , but with a ketogenic diet, the body goes into ketosis, not ketoacidosis, which is something that people with Type I diabetes can go into: in addition to their bodies burning fat, they also have insanely high levels of glucose in their blood. There’s no risk of ketoacidosis on a ketogenic diet, and in fact in the old days before insulin, one of the remedies was a ketogenic diet. It’s still often used for seizures as well.

Plumbago

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4 hours ago, plumbago said:

I’m so sorry you feel you must steal, that must be awful. The only thing I might consider is that it can become a habit, especially the self-justification part.

Not that I'm recommending it right now for you , but with a ketogenic diet, the body goes into ketosis, not ketoacidosis, which is something that people with Type I diabetes can go into: in addition to their bodies burning fat, they also have insanely high levels of glucose in their blood. There’s no risk of ketoacidosis on a ketogenic diet, and in fact in the old days before insulin, one of the remedies was a ketogenic diet. It’s still often used for seizures as well.

Plumbago

Okay good point. I did not know that about ketosis. Thanks for educating me.

 

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11 hours ago, Celiac4762 said:

Nightsky,

what carbs would I eat? Am I allowed any type of rice if I'm grain free? I eat lots of potatoes but sometimes I feel it's too much. I cook all the time and eat about 90% whole foods  with the exception of peanut butter and ground beef. 

Hi Celiac4762,

The carbs I eat are sweet potato, parsnip and squash plus loads of fruit. With rice I'm ok if it's from a reputable source. If I ever get glutened by something then I steer clear of it for a month to give myself an extra break and then go back to it in smallish quantities. I have carbs once a day rather than every meal to save time.

I can hear in your tone this tired, fed up tone that I recognise so well from when I get glutened. I know what it's like to dream of living in a far away gluten free bubble. I felt like that but after a couple of months (which were a hard adjustment) I got to a stage of knowing what I needed to do. Your medical background will help you methodically work out what you need to cut out and what is safe and you will get there. Stick with college. Don't let this crappy stage take that away.  

The thing that saved me though over everything was finding this article:

https://bmcgastroenterol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-230X-13-40

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1 hour ago, NightSky said:

Hi Celiac4762,

The carbs I eat are sweet potato, parsnip and squash plus loads of fruit. With rice I'm ok if it's from a reputable source. If I ever get glutened by something then I steer clear of it for a month to give myself an extra break and then go back to it in smallish quantities. I have carbs once a day rather than every meal to save time.

I can hear in your tone this tired, fed up tone that I recognise so well from when I get glutened. I know what it's like to dream of living in a far away gluten free bubble. I felt like that but after a couple of months (which were a hard adjustment) I got to a stage of knowing what I needed to do. Your medical background will help you methodically work out what you need to cut out and what is safe and you will get there. Stick with college. Don't let this crappy stage take that away.  

The thing that saved me though over everything was finding this article:

https://bmcgastroenterol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-230X-13-40

I appreciate you.

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I'm so sorry. Nursing school is rigorous enough on top of all this stress.  And, kudos to you for cooking regularly even in school.  I've been through a lot of school and I never managed that.  I can see how it feels hopeless to try and change your roommate's behavior - almost like an insurmountable hurdle!

After reading all of these followup posts, I was doing some more thinking. One idea  is posting an add for a gluten free roommate next semester. The more I talk to people the more people I meet that are gluten free. Maybe there is someone out there like you. And one thing I know about medical people is that they are not embarrassed to discuss medical problems (even the ones they should be embarrassed to discuss :) )  Put the word out there in your class - find out if there are people doing something similar - maybe they are gluten-free for health or mood or diabetes. And look for people that are low carb, Whole 30, Ketogenic or similar - those folks don't eat gluten either - they just don't call themselves "gluten free".  Maybe you don't have to be trapped in your current situation. 

I eat a lot of eggs and beans which are cheap ways to get protein without meat.

Also, (and I know this might be controversial) but there is a study out there, that says that celiac patients that get neurotic about avoiding gluten and focus on only eating certified etc  have a worse quality of life (and no improvement in control of their celiac) compared to people who are not as neurotic and eat gluten free foods (but don't only eat certified). That may be a whole separate post - but it's worth considering. I'm one of the neurotic types but I'm thinking about how to be not so crazy! :) 

I wish you the best!

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