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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes

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I have a few things I would like to talk about.  The following are excellent.  AL-90 Digestive Enzymes by  Allegany Nutrition.  Gut-pro by Corganic.

Both are Gluten and Corn Free, no fillers, very pure. If you have stopped eating gluten and are still feeling sick etc, corn might be the problem. 

Many gluten free products use corn as an assumed safe grain substitute.  Are you buying into this myth?

A Study published in the journal Gut identified that corn gluten caused an inflammatory reaction in patients with celiac disease.

“The observation that corn gluten challenge induced an abnormal NO reaction in some of our patients with celiac disease is intriguing as maize is considered safe and is recommended as the substitute cereal in a gluten free diet.”

Source:

Gut. 2005; 54:769-774.

Gluten Free Society’s Stance

Corn is a grain.  Corn has gluten.  Many believe that corn gluten does not induce damage the same way that wheat, barley, and rye do.  The fact of the matter is, gluten has not been studied adequately.  Most of what we know about celiac disease and gluten have to do with gliadin (the gluten found in wheat only).  As a nutritionist with over 10 years of experience guiding those with gluten sensitivity, I have seen corn be a severe problem for the majority of gluten intolerant patients.  Many claim that they don’t react to corn and feel fine after eating it.  The same can be said of those with silent celiac disease.  Remember that a lack of symptoms does not mean that internal damage is not occurring.   All of that being said, we should not make assumptions.  Common sense and intelligent thought should be used as a basis for our dietary decisions.  Gluten aside, consider the following about corn:

  1. It is the second most commonly genetically modified food on the planet (soy is #1)
  2. Genetic modification of foods continues to kill animals in scientific studies.
  3. It is an incomplete protein.
  4. It is difficult for humans to digest (ever see corn in your stool?)
  5. It is high in calories and low in nutrient value
  6. It is a new food to the human genome.
  7. It is being used as a staple food for our cattle, fish, chicken, and cars.
  8. Cows and fish are not designed to eat grain.  (Have you ever seen a fish jump out of a lake into a corn field for supper?)
  9. When animals eat corn as a staple they have shorter life spans.
  10. Corn fed beef is linked to heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and obesity.  Grass fed beef is not.
  11. Fructose derived from corn is toxic to the liver and contributes to severe health issues.
  12. Corn syrup has mercury in it.
  13. The list can go on and on and on…

Many consumers bow to the alter of “Gluten Free”  packaged foods as if the label is a safety net.  “Gluten Free”  on the package does not mean that the food is healthy.  Do not deny yourself the God given right to be healthy.

Remember, corn has gluten.  The gluten in corn has not been adequately studied.  Many studies to date have shown that corn induces inflammatory damage in those with gluten sensitivity.  Almost half of all celiac patients don’t get better on a wheat, rye, and barley free diet.  Is their a link between corn and refractory celiac disease?  At this point in time we do not know for sure, but 10 years of clinical experience with gluten intolerant patients reacting to corn is enough data for me.


Read more at https://www.glutenfreesociety.org/corn-gluten-damages-celiac-patients/#k6zhsrdZMK82e0Vi.99

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Intriguing, unsure if fear mongering....but I do know I developed a allergy to corn after my celiac diagnosis. There are a few other members that have a intolerance to it and some it even triggers psychological symptoms when consumed.  In the end I dropped all grains due to celiac complications leading to other AI issues.

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7 hours ago, starcaster2358 said:

As a nutritionist with over 10 years of experience guiding those with gluten sensitivity, I have seen corn be a severe problem for the majority of gluten intolerant patients.

Do you work exclusively with celiac patients?

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1 hour ago, Victoria1234 said:

Do you work exclusively with celiac patients?

If you read a bit more carefully, what was stated is a quote from another source, not the original posters words. 

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3 hours ago, Ennis_TX said:

If you read a bit more carefully, what was stated is a quote from another source, not the original posters words. 

thanks. I was all excited thinking we had a nutritionist on the boards.

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1 hour ago, Victoria1234 said:

thanks. I was all excited thinking we had a nutritionist on the boards.

Well many of us are self taught nutritionist, I know we also have at least one lab tech worker, 2 nurses, 1 baker, 2 health bloggers/book authors and I suspect we have more. Do not recall names of said members to link directly but has been brought up over the years. I am sure there are more, I myself studied quite a bit about interactions and nutritional related symptoms and disorders. I think we do have one person who recently joined who sounds like they are a nutritionist, I have not talked directly to them but I am envious of their knowledge and ability to communicate and recall issues better then me (blasted be this damaged memory and brain of mine).

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Gluten is an umbrella term for the storage proteins that are found in grains. They are all slightly different in structure, and an autoimmune response occurs when celiacs are exposed to those found in wheat, barley, rye and oats (in some people). Some people may also have an intolerance to corn or an allergy, but that is likely separate from celiac disease unless the corn is contaminated with gluten (which it can be, depending on the source). I for example, am allergic to soy. It makes my throat and mouth itchy immediately. This is separate from celiac disease, and many celiacs enjoy soy-based foods without problems.

I don't know enough about the validity of the methods described in the study you linked to be sure, but it doesn't seem to be that conclusive - no significant differences between controls and celiacs were found for corn. Essentially they took syringes filled with corn or wheat gluten and emptied them into people's rectums (no eating involved) and measured gases emitted (farted out) that are correlated with inflammation for some time afterwards. I am not a scientist in this field, but this doesn't seem a great proxy to me as most of the celiac response is in the small intestine. They do talk about "some" celiacs having a "small" increased gas output in response to corn, but that was less than the response to wheat gluten. Maybe those people are allergic to corn or have another inflammatory bowel disease? So essentially, I'm not really sure that they've found much here.

I would also avoid Gluten Free Society's website. A lot/most of their information is not factual or presents facts misleadingly/without context. 

That said, corn may genuinely be something your system does not appreciate. If that's the case, don't eat it.

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Real scientific study 

"Maize prolamins could induce a gluten-like cellular immune response in some celiacdisease patients."

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24152750

And another real study discusses grains and their effects on the mind and body.

"Bread and Other Edible Agents of Mental Disease."

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4809873/

 

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The first study linked above by knitty kitty is indeed legit!  Mexican Conacyt is like our National Science Foundation - a prestigious and heavily peer-reviewed federal funding source.  I react to corn and corn flour but not to tortillas and chips.  I wonder if the processing (which I think includes lyming) de-activates the protein?  I have used corn occasionally in cooking, and tend to treat it like a condiment, not a side, but this has me re-evaluating.  

 

Edited comments:  Second study is in a questionable journal, one that has been widely noted recently to be a "pay to publish" Journal.  However there are still legitimate scientists who publish there. Regarding corn in the US: last summer we drove through Kansas and Iowa on a trip.  Wheat was everywhere!  Towns that were too small to have a gas station had a grain elevator.  Guess what was growing right next to wheat fields, grain processing plants, etc?  That's right - young corn plants.  I'm thinking all those grain storage places, farm equipment, even the soil, is completely saturated with wheat!  I don't know if it's a problem, I just know that my son said "oh my gosh mom you could never live here, there is what everywhere"

Edited by mcbphd1

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