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rarchy

Does celiac cause regular ridges on nails (Beau's lines?)

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I was wondering if any of you guys have or had ridges on your nails which you think are related to celiac/gluten?

For about the last year and a half I have had these horizontal ridges, they are most prominent on my thumbs but also on my other fingernails (and I think my toenails). I believe they are something called Beau's Lines, which occur due to an underlying condition. If it is due to celiac then this is fine as I was only diagnosed 6 months ago, however what is strange is when they first appeared. I believe I had celiac for at least 5 years prior to getting diagnosed as I had been experiencing regular mild digestive issues (constipation, bloat, wind etc), and these have more or less cleared up. However my nails only started to look funny a year and a half ago, and have gotten worse. At first the ridges were at least 2 or 3 millimeters apart, but in the last few months they have become 1 mm apart which indicated something happening every 1-2 weeks. In 6 months I may have eaten gluten once or twice by mistake, but generally I am very careful and so I can't believe it can be specifically due to gluten intake, especially as my digestion is now usually fine.

I mentioned them to the doctors once (before I was diagnosed), they were completely unconcerned and said nails sometimes do funny things (I was surprised as I thought nails were a good indicator of health). I am sure if I went again they would say its just the celiac and I need to give it time, so really I wanted to check with the celiac/gluten intolerant community if this is common, and if anyone else had to wait a while before they went? I don't want to be ignoring potentially another underlying condition.

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Beau's lines can be caused by malnutrition and malnutrition can be caused by Celiac.     Nails grow very slowly so it could take some time for them to go away if they do.    Maybe see a dermatologist if you haven't already  Also do a search on this site, or on Google and it will bring you back here.  There are a lot of old topics about this  :)  

From https://glutenfreeworks.com/health/horizontal-and-vertical-ridges-fragile-nails-2/

Beau’s lines occur due to temporary cessation of growth of proximal nail matrix at the nail base. As the finger nail grows at the rate of 0.1 mm/day, the time course of the illness can be estimated from the position of the Beau’s line from proximal nail fold.1 Beau’s lines are frequently seen in nutritional deficiency states, bacterial illness, acute stress, and systemic disease. The conditions where Beau’s lines have been described include severe systemic illness, chemotherapy, malnutrition, zinc deficiency, trauma, paronychia, pemphigus, and Kawasaki disease.2 Beau’s lines are commonly seen in patients undergoing chemotherapy.3

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I agree with Judy3 - malnutrition, vitamin / mineral deficiency.

You can read the following article: 'Nutrition and nail disease':

http://www.sbne.org.br/pdf/AC-Nutrition-and-nail-disease.pdf

Beau's lines are discussed on page 423:

- protein deficiency

- pellagra = B3 deficiency

- dysregulated blood mineral levels - such as low calcium

- arsenic toxicity

Abstract:

The nail is a specialized keratinous skin appendage that grows approximately 2 to 3 mm per month, with complete replacement achieved in 6 to 9 months. Although this structure can be easily overlooked, nail disorders comprise approximately 10% of all dermatologic conditions. This contribution first provides an overview on the basic anatomy of the nail that will delineate between the nail unit (eg, hyponychium, nail bed, proximal nail fold, and matrix) and anatomic components not part of the nail unit (eg, lateral nail folds, nail plate, and eponychium). The function of each nail structure will also be presented. The chemical profile of the normal nail plate is reviewed with a discussion of its keratin content (hair type keratin vs epithelial type keratin), sulfur content, and mineral composition, including magnesium, calcium, iron, zinc, sodium, and copper. The remainder will focus on nail manifestations seen in states of malnutrition. Virtually every nutritional deficiency can affect the growth of the nail in some manner. Finally, the discussion will include anecdotal use of nutritional and dietary supplements in the setting of brittle nail syndrome as well as a brief overview of biotin and its promising utility in the treatment of nail disorders.

 

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If memory serves, I think psoriasis can cause those ridges, and psoriasis can be a symptom or offshoot of Celiac. I've had psoriasis for years! and some ridges, but discovered by accident/divine intervention, that carpets caused my psoriasis.

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Hi all,

Thanks for your replies, some really helpful information. I had googled it all before but just got very confused! The malnutrition does sound the most likely cause, so I am trying to get to the bottom of what is specifically causing my nails to grow like this.

Looking at those links and others it seems zinc and vitamin b3 are both possible causes. Apparently Vit B3 deficiency is very rare, although I assume being celiac it is possible. 

I also have been getting eczema flare ups on my knuckles and fingers for the last year or so, and I also have acne flare ups (although I have always been prone to acne), so I wonder if any of this is all related. I wanted to see a dermatologist but the doctor wouldnt refer me (said that they can do the tests themselves and anyway there is a years wait to see one on the NHS). So I am going to have some tests and will see what the results are. Apparently though they cannot test for Vit B3 deficiency so not sure how I will find that out ...

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On 17/10/2017 at 4:03 PM, Courtney33 said:

If memory serves, I think psoriasis can cause those ridges, and psoriasis can be a symptom or offshoot of Celiac. I've had psoriasis for years! and some ridges, but discovered by accident/divine intervention, that carpets caused my psoriasis.

Interesting, although looking at photos of nails affected by psoriasis mine look different so not sure if it is that

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On 11/2/2017 at 9:25 AM, rarchy said:

Hi all,

Thanks for your replies, some really helpful information. I had googled it all before but just got very confused! The malnutrition does sound the most likely cause, so I am trying to get to the bottom of what is specifically causing my nails to grow like this.

Looking at those links and others it seems zinc and vitamin b3 are both possible causes. Apparently Vit B3 deficiency is very rare, although I assume being celiac it is possible. 

I also have been getting eczema flare ups on my knuckles and fingers for the last year or so, and I also have acne flare ups (although I have always been prone to acne), so I wonder if any of this is all related. I wanted to see a dermatologist but the doctor wouldnt refer me (said that they can do the tests themselves and anyway there is a years wait to see one on the NHS). So I am going to have some tests and will see what the results are. Apparently though they cannot test for Vit B3 deficiency so not sure how I will find that out ...

Hi.  I'm glad you found the link helpful.  I have some more for you.  

Celiac Disease causes malabsorption which results in malnutrition.  I had developed pellagra and my doctors didn't recognize it because they had never seen it.  That's a third world disease, right?  No!  It's a malnutrition disease that can happen to anyone with malabsorption. 

https://www.celiac.com/articles/24658/1/A-Differential-Diagnosis-How-Pellagra-Can-be-Confused-with-Celiac-Disease/Page1.html

Newly diagnosed Celiacs often have poor vitamin and mineral levels.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3820055/#!po=11.8056

And even long time gluten free Celiacs can have nutritional deficiencies.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12144584

There are only a few vitamins and minerals that can be measured accurately by blood tests.  Other testing methods require testing for vitamin byproducts in the urine.  Vitamins and minerals are used within the cells, in the tissues of the body, so getting an accurate measurement might be difficult. However, I'd encourage you to let your doctor do what tests he can to determine your nutritional status.

The eight B vitamins all work together, so supplementing all of them is more beneficial than just supplementing just one.  

Correcting nutritional deficiencies can take several months.  But once your body starts getting the proper nutrients it needs, you'll notice improvements.  

Hope this helps!

 

 

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