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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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kareng

Gluten found in gluten reduced beers

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https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29047268

 

"...standard, a competitive ELISA, may indicate gluten values <20 mg/kg, which is deemed safe for people with celiac disease. However, in this study, LC-MS analyses revealed gluten peptides derived from hydrolysed fragments, many >30 kDa in size. Barley gluten (hordeins) were detected in all beers analysed with peptides representing all hordein classes detected in conventional beers, but also alarmingly in many gluten-reduced beers...."

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Thanks for posting this Karen. I haven't dared try any 'gluten removed' beers and don't think I ever will. I'll stick to Green's or Redbridge for my after mowing refreshment.

 

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Thanks very much. A gluten removed anything just sounds wrong.

sadly haven't found any gluten-free beer I like so I just stick with water, lol. 

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Used some nice hard cider for a sub in beer can chicken last month for a cookout I was doing. I have been debating using it in place of beer in some marinades, baked goods, or roast that are cooked in a beer. I hear good reviews on them and I keep thinking the ciders might work I know I hear of people using AceCiders but I have not seen them. I used the following ones so far and only the apple. https://austineastciders.com/

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24 minutes ago, Ennis_TX said:

Used some nice hard cider for a sub in beer can chicken last month for a cookout I was doing. I have been debating using it in place of beer in some marinades, baked goods, or roast that are cooked in a beer. I hear good reviews on them and I keep thinking the ciders might work I know I hear of people using AceCiders but I have not seen them. I used the following ones so far and only the apple. https://austineastciders.com/

Austin's  are good ciders!  

I have good luck using regular ( non- alcoholic) cider, especially for pork  roasts and pork chops!

 

but they do leave a bit of an Apple taste.  I think Austins has a dry cider?  That is less sweet, more beer- like.   They also have an interesting orange flavored one.  Might be good for chicken dishes.  The pineapple didn't taste very pineapples to me.

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2 hours ago, kareng said:

Austin's  are good ciders!  

I have good luck using regular ( non- alcoholic) cider, especially for pork  roasts and pork chops!

 

but they do leave a bit of an Apple taste.  I think Austins has a dry cider?  That is less sweet, more beer- like.   They also have an interesting orange flavored one.  Might be good for chicken dishes.  The pineapple didn't taste very pineapples to me.

Yeah I can not drink but as a chef the culinary uses for liquors, wines, and beer/ciders is amazing. Yeah I was thinking the same thing with the orange one using it in wither crock pot a bunch of chicken breast in, marinade them in prior to cooking is another thought. The apple one, I was thinking of doing a roast in it. you know how some people crock pot a roast in dr. pepper, root beer, or actual beer? I was thinking of doing a shoulder roast, or a boston butt in austin apple cider with some bacon and a bit of maplehoney in the pot along with half a sweet onion in there. Cook it say 8 hours, then drain it out and shred it then serve up with some sauce or plain depending on finished flavor. Thinking this would be nice to serve up with my bread for sandwiches, by itself, or perhaps over some chips.

I also have this idea of using it to make a turkey or ham gravy, 8oz, simmer it down with trimmings and drippings from the holiday turkey/ham, the onion we cook in the pan with it chopped, 3 chopped roma tomatoes,  bay leaf, stir it with a rosemary twig, crush it all up with the back of the ladle,  then strain it out and pour in a gravy bowl with some chopped toasted walnuts in the bottom to be served with the dressing, and potatoes at new years for the family....Basing this on what I did last year with a dry sherry, but replacing it with the cider.

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5 hours ago, kareng said:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29047268

 

"...standard, a competitive ELISA, may indicate gluten values <20 mg/kg, which is deemed safe for people with celiac disease. However, in this study, LC-MS analyses revealed gluten peptides derived from hydrolysed fragments, many >30 kDa in size. Barley gluten (hordeins) were detected in all beers analysed with peptides representing all hordein classes detected in conventional beers, but also alarmingly in many gluten-reduced beers...."

It's funny you post this as the other day I was looking at the supermarket shelves in the gluten free section. There was a very impressive choice of beers.  A couple of years ago there would be one or two, but I think I counted 8 including a very tempting IPA and another real ale type alongside the more established commercial beers.

I don't drink any more, I gave up in an attempt to help my healing process and didn't start again. I do sometimes think about it however and occasionally I'll miss that beer taste and fancy one. I'm suspicious of the gluten remove process however and this study suggests at least some of the gluten-free beers may not be gluten-free after all. So thanks for posting, this will give me pause for thought should I ever choose to rejoin the drinkers of the world...

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31 minutes ago, Jmg said:

It's funny you post this as the other day I was looking at the supermarket shelves in the gluten free section. There was a very impressive choice of beers.  A couple of years ago there would be one or two, but I think I counted 8 including a very tempting IPA and another real ale type alongside the more established commercial beers.

I don't drink any more, I gave up in an attempt to help my healing process and didn't start again. I do sometimes think about it however and occasionally I'll miss that beer taste and fancy one. I'm suspicious of the gluten remove process however and this study suggests at least some of the gluten-free beers may not be gluten-free after all. So thanks for posting, this will give me pause for thought should I ever choose to rejoin the drinkers of the world...

this article made no mention of "gluten free beer".  There is no reason to think that they are not actually gluten free as they are made with only gluten-free ingredients.

This article is about beer made with barley.  These are not gluten-free beers but often called "gluten reduced" or "gluten removed" in the marketplace.   They are not legally allowed to call the beer gluten-free in the US.  

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4 hours ago, kareng said:

This article is about beer made with barley.

Yes, the beers which I'm referring to had barley listed in the ingredients panel. For example, this was one I was looking at made from malted barley.

4 hours ago, kareng said:

This article is about beer made with barley.  These are not gluten-free beers but often called "gluten reduced" or "gluten removed" in the marketplace.   They are not legally allowed to call the beer gluten-free in the US.  

Here in Europe things are slightly different. As long as the 20ppm test is passed beers can call themselves gluten free, including ones which you would see called gluten removed. So they share the shelves in the Free From section with the naturally gluten free beers you refer to. 

To clarify, I'd be relaxed drinking a beer which never had gluten in it, such as the sorghum based beers which share the shelves with the gluten removed ones over here. I'm nervous about those where the gluten has been removed during the brewing process. This is in part due to a strange reaction I had to another gluten removed beer marketed as gluten free  back when I still drank. :)

 

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I was suspect of this. I did try a sip of my husbands gluten removed Daura Damm during my gluten challenge, since well if there was barley in it I was adding to my challenge. 

It tasted too good ha ha like gluten beer 🍻. So I determined I would not drink it concerned about undetectable levels. I was grateful the company made it for my husband to consume since my trigger sensitive issues have us remove all gluten including his beer from the house.

Edited by Awol cast iron stomach
Forgot word

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